Andrew Davies

Andrew Davies

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BBC 'War & Peace' TV Series Photocall

Andrew Davies - BBC 'War & Peace' TV series photocall at the May Fair Hotel - Departures - London, United Kingdom - Monday 14th December 2015

Andrew Davies

Broadcasting Press Guild Awards

Andrew Davies - Broadcasting Press Guild Awards held at the Theatre Royal - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Friday 28th March 2014

Andrew Davies
Andrew Davies

The Three Musketeers Review


OK
Using the basic plot from the Alexandre Dumas novel, this film diverges wildly by adding anachronistic gadgetry and playing events more like pantomime farce than a 17th century swashbuckler. But the cast is likeable, and the duels are fun despite the ludicrous action set pieces.

D'Artagnan (Lerman) is a country teen who heads to Paris to join the musketeers, special officers loyal to King Louis (Fox) but not the manipulative Cardinal Richelieu (Waltz), who has a guard of his own headed by Rochefort (Mikkelsen). D'Artangan immediately falls foul of the three musketeers Athos, Porthos and Aramis (Macfadyen, Stevenson and Evans), then teams up with them to fight off Richelieu's goons. And soon they're involved in a devious plot by Richelieu and Milady (Jovovich) to spark a war between Louis and England's Duke of Buckingham (Bloom).

Continue reading: The Three Musketeers Review

Brideshead Revisited Review


Excellent
The palatial estate sits languid against the landscape, the massive family home looking as much like a museum as a manor. Within its walls are secrets kept silent for far too many years, a lineage forged in lies, deception, and an unflappable faith in God. For the Flytes, Brideshead reflects their own insular existence -- self contained, complete with its own ornate chapel and religious iconography. But for anyone outside the clan, such opulence shields wealth of a different, disturbing kind. And should one revisit the famed locale, they too will find themselves lost in its amoral allure.

When we first meet middle class student Charles Ryder (Matthew Goode), he is leaving his distant father for Oxford. Instantly, he is thrust into a world of privilege, and the seedy sphere of influence surrounding fey fop Sebastian Flyte (Ben Whishaw). Over the course of the school year, they become inseparable in ways that suggest something other than simple companionship. Fate finds the pair spending the summer at Sebastian's family home, known as Brideshead. There, Charles meets two women who will figure prominently in his future -- the staunchly Catholic matriarch Lady Marchmain (Emma Thompson) and Sebastian's glamorous sister Julia (Hayley Atwell). Over the next few years, everything about Brideshead, from the people to the place itself, will haunt Charles' attempt to forge an identity for himself, as well as guide what he really wants out of life.

Continue reading: Brideshead Revisited Review

Pride And Prejudice (1995) Review


Excellent
Most film adaptations of classic books are inferior to the books they are based on. This is partly because the written word allows more nuance than the camera, but also because great books don't always have enough plotting or action to make great movies, and film adaptations often overcompensate by rewriting the book in a quest to make it more cinematic. The most obvious recent example (speaking of quests) is The Lord of the Rings: Peter Jackson omitted key scenes, changed others, and generally jacked up Tolkien's fanatically-loved bestseller for no good reason.

So it's an achievement when a famous book makes it to the big screen, or the small screen, intact -- and kudos must go to the A&E/BBC miniseries Pride and Prejudice for flawlessly recreating the classic Jane Austen novel. This production is as faithful to the book as Cliff notes (though at five hours long, it's not much of a time-saver -- you might as well read the book). The filmmakers fill in the off-camera scenes of the book so seamlessly that Austen might have written them herself.

Continue reading: Pride And Prejudice (1995) Review

The Tailor Of Panama Review


OK
Somebody told Pierce Brosnan to change his image.

In The Tailor of Panama -- based on John Le Carré's novel and directed by John Boorman (Beyond Rangoon, Zardoz) -- Brosnan trades in the sophistication of James Bond for the identity of crude, disgraced spy Andy Osnard, an MI-6 operative that has to be shipped off to Panama on account of his loathsome behavior. Once he arrives in Panama City, the bad behavior doesn't stop: Osnard immediately sets upon the task of uncovering "what's going on" with the Panama Canal. Rumors swirl that it will be sold to another country now that Panama has it back from the U.S. Or perhaps there will be a coup from a populist underground?

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Bridget Jones's Diary Review


Good
I'm used to the e-mail: You're not a cheerleader so you shouldn't review Bring It On! Or If you don't like boring movies about Iraqi Kurds you shouldn't review A Time for Drunken Horses! Or If you've never heard of Reinaldo Arenas you shouldn't review a movie about his life (Before Night Falls)!

Sorry, folks, I don't buy it. Do I need to be shot into space to review Apollo 13? A movie should stand on its own whether you're familiar with the subject, whether you're fond of the topic in question, or whether you're a member of the demographic that the film is about or is targeted at. If it especially appeals to a certain group (and what film doesn't?), well, good for you. But I'm going to review whatever I want -- and if you don't want to hear what a white guy in his late 20s has to say about cinema, well, that's just to bad.

Continue reading: Bridget Jones's Diary Review

Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason Review


Weak
In the last three years, Renée Zellweger has lost all 25 pounds of her Bridget Jones weight, vamped her way through Chicago, chunked up again for Cold Mountain, waifed away for Down with Love, and -- finally -- put all that weight back on for her long-awaited return to the role of an insecure Brit -- one which she swore she'd never perform again.

Well, throw enough money at something and it's bound to change people's minds. In fact, that seems to be the operating assumption for the entirety of this sequel, Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason, a lackluster follow-up to the mildly enchanting original.

Continue reading: Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason Review

Circle Of Friends Review


Good
Circle of Friends is the story of three Irish teenage girls, Eve, Nan, and Benny, and their respective quests for love. In 1957 Dublin and nearby Knockglen, we return to a time before the world lost its innocence, before our uncontrollable obsession with physical beauty took hold, and before we had any idea about how a relationship was supposed to work.

As the story opens, the three characters are entering their freshmen year at a Dublin college. Eve (Geraldine O'Rawe) is an orphan, living with the nuns in a convent. Nan (Saffron Burrows) is a gorgeous and wicked socialite with ulterior motives. And Benny (Minnie Driver) is a Plain Jane heroine, plagued by overbearing parents and a trollish suitor (Cumming), and is still trying to overcome her adolescent awkwardness. Chris O'Donnell plays Jack, "the cutest boy in school" who becomes the eventual point of contention in the story, developing a deep love for Benny, but perpetually confused and torn between those competing for his affections and attempts to control his future.

Continue reading: Circle Of Friends Review

Andrew Davies

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