Amy Madigan

Amy Madigan

Amy Madigan Quick Links

News Pictures Film Quotes RSS

The ceremony honoring Ed Harris with a Star on The Hollywood Walk of Fame

Lily Dolores Harris and Amy Madigan - The ceremony honoring Ed Harris with a Star on The Hollywood Walk of Fame at HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 13th March 2015

Lily Dolores Harris and Amy Madigan
Amy Madigan, Ed Harris and Lily Dolores Harris
Marcia Gay Harden, Ed Harris, Amy Madigan, Holly Hunter and Glenne Headl
Marcia Gay Harden, Ed Harris, Amy Madigan, Holly Hunter and Glenne Headl
Marcia Gay Harden, Ed Harris, Amy Madigan, Holly Hunter and Glenne Headl

Ed Harris honored on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Marcia Gay Harden, Ed Harris, Amy Madigan, Holly Hunter and Guest - Ed Harris is honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 13th March 2015

Marcia Gay Harden, Ed Harris, Amy Madigan, Holly Hunter and Guest
Marcia Gay Harden, Ed Harris, Amy Madigan, Holly Hunter and Guest
Marcia Gay Harden, Ed Harris and Andy Garcia
Marcia Gay Harden, Ed Harris and Andy Garcia
Mitch O'Farrell, Marcia Gay Harden, Andy Garcia, Ed Harris and Leron Gubler

New York premiere of 'Run All Night'

Amy Madigan and Ed Harris - New York premiere of 'Run All Night' at AMC Lincoln Square - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 10th March 2015

World premiere of 'Run All Night'

Ed Harris and Amy Madigan - Shots from the World premiere of 'Run All Night' as a variety of stars took to the red carpet at the AMC theater in Lincoln Square, New York City, New York, United States - Monday 9th March 2015

Joel Kinnaman, Liam Neeson, Ed Harris, Genesis Rodriguez and Common
Liam Neeson and Ed Harris
Joel Kinnaman, Liam Neeson, Ed Harris, Genesis Rodriguez and Common
Ed Harris

Los Angeles premiere of 'Frontera'

Amy Madigan and Ed Harris - Los Angeles premiere of 'Frontera' - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 21st August 2014

Amy Madigan and Ed Harris
Amy Madigan, Eva Longoria, Ed Harris and Michael Berry
Amy Madigan and Ed Harris

Winter Passing Review


Weak
It's been said that it's easier for a playwright to write a screenplay than vice versa. This has to do with the idea that playwriting is, at its core, a study in character and story above all other things. Most of the time, I agree with this statement: Tony Kushner wrote the scripts for Munich and the magnificent screen adaptation of his Angels in America and Tom Stoppard was a playwright and drama critic long before he wrote Brazil, Empire of the Sun, or Enigma. There are a few dozen more, and sometimes they make pretty excellent directors as well (David Mamet, Neil Labute). Adam Rapp's transition, however, isn't as smooth as you might hope.

Reese Holden (Zooey Deschanel) is just another actress trying to make it in New York City. She goes to auditions, works at a bar, and beds other struggling actors who she quickly runs away from the minute the deeds are done. There's one hitch: Reese's father happens to be Don Holden (Ed Harris), a famous writer who specialized in nightmarish scenarios about college students who go on murdering sprees. Reese is propositioned by a publishing agent (Amy Madigan) to go home and retrieve a box of love letters her mother left her and then sell it for publication. After a slight hesitancy, Reese takes the trip to Michigan to get the letters and is surprised when she finds her father living with two strangers. Corbit (Will Ferrell) works as Mr. Holden's personal assistant and Shelly (Amelia Warner) runs the house and cooks the meals. Reese slowly uncovers secrets about her mother's death and her father's neglect that are, to be honest, easy to figure out if you're really paying attention.

Continue reading: Winter Passing Review

Shot in the Heart Review


Terrible
Here's another made for HBO movie that clearly aspires for cinematic splendor, circling the actors in dizzying tracking shots. Shot in the Heart overcompensates for the small screen. Since it's largely told in scenes where death row inmate Gary Gilmore (Elias Koteas) and his younger brother Mikal (Giovanni Ribisi) discuss their family history and right-to-die ethics across the table from each other, such grandiose flourishes ring false. I much preferred the non-flashy functionality of HBO's recent Conspiracy (the nazi board room meeting to discuss the Final Solution to the "Jewish problem," starring Kenneth Branagh) because at least it was willing to follow the boxed-in rules of TV conventions. Shot in the Heart feels overcooked.

In the allegory-seeking hands of director Agnieszka Holland (Total Eclipse), no opportunity is resisted for family dinner flashbacks where sinister dad Sam Shepard knocks over the turkey and throws young Gary around the room. Religious fervor is represented through wide-eyed mania in Shepard's resident madman and Amy Madigan's Carrie-tinged Mormon mother. More interesting are the prison scenes (shades of Oz), where Ribisi and Koteas are boxed in by walls of glass, steel, and wire frames. Unfortunately, the two ferociously talented lead performers are encouraged to conform to Actor's Studio emoting--Koteas can't keep still, Ribisi's hands are constantly kneading handy props (and, barring that, are continually rubbing away thinly veiled tears).

Continue reading: Shot in the Heart Review

Streets of Fire Review


Grim
A bizarre take on West Side Story, Streets of Fire gives us Paré and Lane as the beast and the beauty in the music scene of "another time, another place" -- a time that manages to muddle the hair styles, attire, and vehicles of the 1930s, 1950s, and 1980s. Needless to say, it's an ugly time, an ugly place. The "rock-and-roll fable" of Streets of Fire doesn't have much to say, culminating in a pick-axe fight between Paré and bad-boy Dafoe, which I think says just about all you need to know.

Admissions Review


OK
Some kids are so disaffected that they can't even be bothered to take their college admissions interviews seriously. Oh, they can fill out the paperwork, but ask them to answer a question about what they want to be when they grow up, and they'll sabatoge it.

Lauren Ambrose stars in this strange and often baffling story of a girl, her mentally disabled sister, and a mother who ignores the former and dotes on the latter. Faced with going to college, Admissions tells us that Lauren shouldn't care because mom (Amy Madigan) doesn't care about Lauren. Admittedly, mom could give the redhead a little more face time, but she truly does have her hands full dealing with the other one (Taylor Roberts -- who gives the least believable "special" performance in history).

Continue reading: Admissions Review

Field Of Dreams Review


Excellent
Briefly, the plot of Field of Dreams: A thirty-something man hears voices from a Higher Power, abandons his ties to his family, wanders the earth gathering a passel of believers, suffers the mocking laughter of his townspeople but soon redeems himself, and, finally, is reconciled with his father. Say what you want about Kevin Costner, but you can't say he never played Jesus Christ.

In the '90s, Costner's messianic ambitions - his belief that his aw-shucks Everyman demanded an epic canvas to match his bank account - produced some of the worst films ever made. But his attitude works perfectly in 1989's Field of Dreams (based on the book Shoeless Joe) because the setting is appropriately modest; if we could never buy him as a post-apocalyptic savior, he's just fine as a middle-class hero. Costner plays Ray Kinsella, a rat-race refugee who's moved his wife Anni (Amy Madigan) and daughter Karin (Gaby Hoffmann) to a farmhouse in Iowa. One evening, alone amongst the corn, Ray hears a voice tell him, "If you build it, they will come." A vision of a baseball field is presented before him, and he immediately sets to work re-creating it, believing that it might help him better understand his late father, from whom he was long estranged.

Continue reading: Field Of Dreams Review

With Friends Like These... Review


Weak
Hollywood farces are always hard to pull off, and this one-joke movie proves increasingly frustrating despite a few bright moments. Robert Costanzo stars as an out-of-work character actor in L.A. who gets the call to read for the part of Al Capone in an upcoming Scorsese film. Of course, he blabs to all his friends and soon enough, they're all up for the part. Most of the film's scenes are predicated by "You gotta promise not to tell anyone..." and of course they invariably do. But backstabbing has never been more repetitive. By the time Scorsese makes his cameo appearance, give yourself a point if you still care who gets the part. Watch for Bill Murray in a stellar yet miniscule role.

Twice in a Lifetime Review


Weak
Gene Hackman as tender steelworker/father in Seattle? We don't think so either, and this movie's ultimate plotline -- about Hackman's falling out with wife Ellen Burstyn and falling in with local hussie Ann-Margret, just doesn't play well today. It probably didn't play well in 1985, either, which is why you haven't heard of it. Despite a few interesting performances from some of cinema's biggest names, this one still merits a pass.

The Ranch Review


OK
Anyone who's ever seen any documentary footage of real Nevada brothels (or has been to one personally -- hey, we don't judge), knows that the ladies that typically work there are hardly mistakable for Hollywood starlets.

Never mind that. If you're willing to suspend disbelief -- completely and utterly -- you might find The Ranch a curious diversion.

Continue reading: The Ranch Review

The Dark Half Review


OK
Genuinely scary though unmemorable Stephen King thriller features a pedantic writer tormented by his "dark half," who enjoys writing twisted horror stories. Recently out on DVD, and worth a look for Timothy Hutton's freaky portrayal of the two halves.

Pollock Review


Good
Please, please, please, please, please read the book that formed the basis of the movie Pollock. Jackson Pollock: An American Saga won the Pulitzer Prize for a good reason: It's a 934-page masterpiece that gets into the guts of the artist now being celebrated on celluloid by Ed Harris. Published in 1989 and written by Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith, the tome contains everything about Pollock that was left out of Harris' up-and-down movie -- and, unfortunately, that means 99 percent of the demons, doubters, friends, and forces that inspired Pollock to drink, paint, drink, and paint again.

A good example: Pollock was suicidal, maniacal and violent throughout his 44-year life. The first sentence of Naifeh's and Smith's book -- the very first sentence -- is this quote from Pollock: "I'm going to kill myself." Explains a lot, but for some odd reason, Harris only hints at Pollock's suicidal tendencies in his long-anticipated film.

Continue reading: Pollock Review

Amy Madigan

Amy Madigan Quick Links

News Pictures Film Quotes RSS