Amy Brenneman

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12th Annual Inspiration Awards red carpet luncheon at The Beverly Hilton Hotel

Amy Brenneman - 12th Annual Inspiration Awards red carpet luncheon at The Beverly Hilton Hotel, to benefit Step Up Women's Network at Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 5th June 2015

Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman

The Face of Love Review


Grim

Middle-aged romances are rare on the big screen, so it's frustrating that this one is so badly compromised by a series of contrived plot points. One gimmick wasn't enough for director-cowriter Arie Posin, who continually twists and turns the events in ways that are both bizarre and melodramatic. Within this, Annette Bening and Ed Harris still manage to create intriguing characters, but it becomes increasingly difficult to care when the screenwriters clearly have trouble on their minds.

It opens as Nikki (Bening) is flooded with memories of her husband Garret (Harris), who died five years ago while they were vacationing in Mexico. Now that their daughter (Jess Weixler) is moving away from home in Los Angeles to attend college in Seattle, Nikki has time to think. Although she wants to remain friends and nothing more with her lusty widowed neighbour Roger (Robin Williams), an old friend of Garret's. Then Nikki meets a man who looks uncannily like Garret and begins stalking him. Tom (Harris again) is an art professor, and when Nikki gets up the nerve to talk to him, she knows she's going to a very odd place.

The film is like a variation on Vertigo, as Posin plays up the freaky doppelganger storyline to add a heightened sense of dangerous tension. But it's not so easy for the audience to accept such a set-up, when one honest conversation would solve everything. Instead, Nikki lies to everyone she knows, hides Tom from them and then lies to Tom as well. It's difficult to take a romance seriously when it has such a fraudulent foundation. Thankfully, Bening gives Nikki a fragility that makes her sympathetic, and her interaction with Harris bristles with unexpected connections because they are experiencing their blossoming relationship in such strikingly different ways. Both of them add layers of interest to their characters that make them engaging between the lines. Sadly, Williams' character never gets a chance to evolve.

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Premiere of 'The Boxtrolls' - Arrivals

Amy Brenneman and Charlotte Tucker Silberling - Stars of the new animated, adventure comedy 'The Boxtrolls' were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived at AMC Universal CityWalk for the films premiere - Universal City, California, United States - Sunday 21st September 2014

Amy Brenneman and Charlotte Tucker Silberling
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman and Charlotte Tucker Silberling

Preimere of 'The Boxtrolls' - Arrivals

Amy Brenneman and Charlotte Silberling - Preimere of 'The Boxtrolls' - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 21st September 2014

Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman

HBO series 'The Leftover'

Amy Brenneman - Amy Brenneman promoting the new HBO series 'The Leftover' - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 24th July 2014

Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman
Amy Brenneman

‘The Leftovers’ Premieres: Stick It Out, This Dark Drama Is Worth It


Justin Theroux Amy Brenneman Liv Tyler Damon Lindelof Christopher Ecclestone

The Leftovers has premiered on HBO, giving viewers their first look at Damon Lindelof's disturbing new show and adaptation of by Tom Perrotta's 2011 novel. If you are a complete newcomer to the concept of the series - no, it's not a sitcom about the perils of dating in later life, it's a dark and mysterious drama about the aftermath and enduring confusion following a rapture-like occurrence.

Justin Theroux The Leftovers
Justin Theroux Takes Centre-Stage In 'The Leftovers,' A Dark, New Drama About Life After An Apocalypse.

The latest post-apocalyptic drama from the Lost writer focusses on a core cast lead by Justin Theroux as police chief Kevin Garvey and his wife, Laurie Garvey, who is played by Amy Brenneman. Lindelof's reputation may be overshadowed by his poorly-received Lost ending but it seems like The Leftovers may just be worth riding out.

Continue reading: ‘The Leftovers’ Premieres: Stick It Out, This Dark Drama Is Worth It

Reviews: HBO's 'The Leftovers' Makes a Solid, If Not Controversial Start


Justin Theroux Amy Brenneman Paterson Joseph

The reviews for David Lindelof’s The Leftovers - which depicts a world in recovery after the disappearance of 2% of its population - are in. And the critics are feeling positive, if not a little confused, by the first few episodes. 

Justin Theroux The Leftovers
Justin Theroux in The Leftovers

“The Sudden Departure” as it has become known in Lindelof’s universe, adapted from the novel of the same name by Tom Perrotta, leaves the residents of Mapletown in relative disarray. And while some claim it was the hand of God – The Rapture (1 Thessalonians 4:16, when the "dead in Christ" and "we who are alive and remain" will be "caught up in the clouds" to meet "the Lord in the air") the characters in this new HBO drama are just as lost as each other – faith or not faith. 

Continue reading: Reviews: HBO's 'The Leftovers' Makes a Solid, If Not Controversial Start

Is HBO's 'The Leftovers' The New Breaking Bad, True Detective, Etc?`


Justin Theroux Damon Lindelof Liv Tyler Amy Brenneman Christopher Eccleston Michael Gaston Ann Dowd Peter Berg

Fans of Game of Thrones who bothered to pay attention to the ads before last night's season premiere were treated to a preview for HBO's new show The Leftovers, which looked pretty awesome. The handy work of Lost's Damon Lindelof, the forthcoming drama series is based on the bestselling 2011 novel by Tom Perrotta.

Justin TherouxJustin Theroux Stars in 'The Leftovers'

It stars Justin Theroux as police chief Kevin Garvey who attempts to maintain calm in the wake of a global Rapture that causes two per cent of the world's population to suddenly disappear. The show focuses on the members of Garvey's suburban community, who are left confused, angry and traumatised by the disappearance of their loved ones. 

Continue reading: Is HBO's 'The Leftovers' The New Breaking Bad, True Detective, Etc?`

Frozen World Premiere at El Capitan Theater

Amy Brenneman - Frozen World Premiere at El Capitan Theater, attended by scores of celebrities and their families - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 20th November 2013

Downloading Nancy Review


Terrible
Maria Bello's world-weary seriousness and plainly-bared sexuality have been put to excellent use in movies like The Cooler and A History of Violence, exploring relationships fraught with wounded desperation and suspicion. Given the existence of these films, Downloading Nancy counts as an abuse of trust. This is not to say that this dark, sexually-explicit picture achieves anywhere near its intended level of provocation. Instead, it leads its actors down a dank alleyway, slowly, with maximum pretension and minimal payoff.

Bello bares her soul, or someone's fumbling interpretation of same, as Nancy, a woman who suffered abuse as a child and is now stuck in a non-abusive but stifling marriage with Albert (Rufus Sewell); she can only feel through pain. Somehow this is meant to relate to the internet, where Nancy, it's implied, spends most of her time and forms her only real relationships, though this all remains largely undramatized. (And not to get too literal, but no one in this movie downloads a damn thing apart from some email).

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The Jane Austen Book Club Review


Terrible
You need neither a deep appreciation for author Jane Austen nor an understanding of her six novels to recognize that The Jane Austen Book Club stinks.

A chick-lit-flick, Book Club is poorly directed by Robin Swicord from her own inconsistent adaptation of Karen Jay Fowler's novel about five women (and one coerced man) who use Austen's novels as a means to escape their broken lives. They cover one book a month, and we roll our eyes as their individual problems mirror the quandaries found in Austen's chapters.

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Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her Review


OK
What happens when you put big stars Glenn Close, Cameron Diaz, Calista Flockhart, Amy Brenneman, and Holly Hunter in a movie together? You go straight to cable, that's what happens. This practically Made for Lifetime feature tells five vaguely interlocking stories about women at crossroads in their lives. One is pregnant and doesn't want the child. One is a lesbian with a dying lover. One is infatuated with the dwarf who lives across the street. You know, your ordinary middle America stuff.

Why didn't this movie find more success? I dunno, maybe it has something to do with the fact that there are two scenes of women sitting on the toilet in the first 20 minutes. Or it could be that it's too chatty, too meandering, and too random to ever really engage the viewer. Whatever, I still don't know what I'm supposed to be able to tell, you know, just by looking at her.

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Nine Lives Review


Grim
A well-cast compilation film suffocating on its own self-importance, Nine Lives aims to tie together nine vastly different stories, but ends up telling hardly any of them well. The conceit of writer/director Rodrigo Garcia is to take nine vignettes, each centered around a different woman (usually in desperate circumstances), and give us a brief glimpse into her life before cutting away to the next one, while stringing a few connecting threads between them all. To ensure that he's not playing favorites, each piece is done in one single Steadicam shot and kept to only nine or ten minutes in length. A minor character from one vignette becomes a major player later on, or vice versa. As in literature, anthology works like this are a hit-and-miss affair, and in this case the misses far outnumber the ones that connect.

Nine Lives opens strong on Sandra (Elpidia Carrillo), an imprisoned mother. Mopping up a floor, she's threatened by fellow prisoners, and harassed by a guard (Miguel Sandoval) who's convinced she can give him information. Everyone tells Sandra she's not going to make it, but you think she just might be able to, hunkering down turtle-like and just plowing through the rest of her sentence. But then her daughter visits, and the phone doesn't work, sending Sandra into a stunning explosion of rage, like a mother bear kept from her cub. It's a short, unrelentingly powerful story, and done by itself it would stand as a sublime little tragedy. The same goes for the final piece, in which Glenn Close and Dakota Fanning (hardly a better match could be imagined) visit a cemetery and talk with sublime ease about not much at all. But then comes the rest of the film in between.

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Fear Review


Unbearable
See Mark Wahlberg and Reese Witherspoon -- before they were stars, and before they knew the difference between a movie script and a pile of dog crap. Fear is easily one of the worst movies of its era, as ridiculous as it is contrived and as boring as it is stupid. Just plain bad, and no good for camp value, even.

Off the Map Review


Excellent
Within the past seven years, Campbell Scott has quietly become an important indie hyphenate, producing and starring in notable art house circuit films including Big Night, Roger Dodger, and the current The Secret Lives of Dentists. His passion for the craft of acting is obvious; it's now also clearly visible in his own directing, with the unconventional and often beautiful family tale, Off the Map.

Based on the play by Joan Ackermann (and adapted by Ackermann for the screen), Off the Map recalls one summer in the life of an offbeat family living off the land in rural New Mexico. It's essentially a series of dialogue-driven scenarios that actors like Joan Allen and Sam Elliott can sink their teeth into; Scott guides them there while avoiding any unnecessary scene-chewing or melodrama that could come with the subject matter. That's an accomplishment in itself -- but the visual dreaminess and charm that Scott weaves into, and wraps around, his performances elevate the film into a poignant and thoughtful work of art.

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Amy Brenneman

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