Radiohead Defend Israel Gig

  • 22 August 2017

Radiohead's Philip Selway thinks it was the ''right decision'' to play their controversial Israel gig last month.

The 'Creep' rockers came under fire from a number of famous faces for going ahead with their planned show in Tel Aviv on July 19, but the band's drummer Philip has said he still believes the group did the right thing in their decision not to pull out of the gig.

Asked whether he felt like the band had burned bridges by playing the show, he said: ''I honestly don't know. That wouldn't have been the basis to make our decision to play there. You know, I think we stand by what we have said and that feels like the right decision.''

Fans in Israel were treated to the band's longest show in a decade, and Philip admits the decision to play for longer came as a result of the gig being their last show ''for a while''.

He told NME magazine: ''I think it was because it was our last show for a while, really. It felt almost like end of tour party. Looking at the set list and thinking 'Oh I want to play that one again, and that one again, and that one again!' And so, it grew from there really.''

Meanwhile, Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke recently defended the band's decision after they were met with criticism from director Ken Loach, who urged them not to support the oppression of Palestinians.

Loach posted on Twitter: ''Radiohead need to decide if they stand with the oppressed or the oppressor. The choice is simple. @thomyorke (sic)''

Thom insisted that they are in no way backing the country's leader Benjamin Netanyahu by holding a concert there.

He fired back on Twitter: ''Playing in a country isn't the same as endorsing its government. We've played in Israel for over 20 years through a succession of governments, some more liberal than others.

''As we have in America. We do not endorse Netanyahu any more than Trump, but we still play in America. Music, art and academia is about crossing boarders not building them, about open minds not closed ones, about shared humanity, dialogue, and freedom of expression. I hope that makes it clear Ken. (sic)''