Douglas Booth

  • 14 May 2010

Date of birth

9th July, 1992

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.85

Douglas Booth (09.07.1992) Douglas Booth is an English actor.

Childhood: Douglas Booth was born in London, England. His parents are Vivien, an artist, and his father works in shipping. He struggled with dyslexia at school and did not succeed academically.

Acting Career: Douglas Booth played Boy George in the BBC drama 'Worried About The Boy' in 2010 opposite Mathew Horne, Mark Gatiss and Marc Warren. In 2011, he was in 'Christopher and His Kind' with Matt Smith and a BBC One adaptation of Charles Dickens' 'Great Expectations'. He was cast as Romeo in 2013's 'Romeo and Juliet' written by Julian Fellowes. Hailee Steinfeld plays Juliet.

Other Career Ventures: Douglas Booth has modelled for the fashion brand Burberry.

The Limehouse Golem Review

OK

A Victorian thriller with rather heavy echoes of Jack the Ripper, this film struggles to rise above the murky atmosphere it weaves. And the plot itself is as dense as the low-lying London fog. But the gifted cast members make the most of the talky dialogue, drawing the audience into a twisty mystery even if it perhaps isn't as surprising as it hopes to be.

This is 1880 East London, where Inspector Kildare (Bill Nighy) has been dogged by rumours that he's "not the marrying kind", so he's given the most hopeless case in town: finding a ghostly serial killer who is staging increasingly elaborate murders. With Constable Flood (Daniel Mays) helping him, Kildare narrows the suspects down to philosopher Karl Marx (Henry Goodman), stage star Dan (Douglas Booth), novelist George (Watkins) or playwright John (Sam Reid), whose actress wife Lizzie (Olivia Cooke) is on trial for poisoning him. For some reason, Kildare becomes particularly intrigued by Lizzie's case, hoping he can get some inside information about her stage colleagues from her.

In adapting Peter Ackroyd's novel, Jane Goldman seems intent on including all of the book's gyrations and details, which can't help but make the film feel overstuffed. Plot-strands head off in every direction (including flashbacks and imagined sequences), many simply vanishing while others take turns that don't quite make sense. Even so, alert viewers will easily work out whodunit by about halfway through. Then the script waits until the very end to reveal this.

Continue reading: The Limehouse Golem Review

Loving Vincent Trailer

Explore the life of one of the world's greatest visionary artists, Vincent Van Gogh, in a stunning biopic spanning his early life through to the last months before his suicide by gunshot wound in 1890 at the age of just 37. We see his world from the perspective of those who knew him the best, including his brother Theo and the postmaster Roulin. Of course, many people mocked him for his eccentricities, for he suffered badly with poor mental health for most of his life; one incident relating to which saw him cut off his own ear and subsequently become hospitalised. Ironically, he never sold any of his paintings, but his talent has lived through more than a century and his works are some of the most priceless pieces in the world.

Shot in the incredible, technicolour style of the Dutch Post-Impressionist artist himself, including animated versions of some of his most famous pictures, 'Loving Vincent' is the world's first painted biographical feature film. Written and directed by Dorota Kobiela ('The Flying Machine') and the Academy Award winning Hugh Welchman ('Peter & the Wolf') in his directorial debut, the making of the film was partially funded by a Kickstarter campaign to enable the training of oil painters in their pursuit of becoming painting-animators, eventually spanning 65,000 frames with a team of 115 painters. A further writing credit was also attributed to Jacek Dehnel.

'Loving Vincent' has already won several prizes including the Audience Award at Annecy International Animated Film Festival, two Golden Trailer Awards for Best Foreign Animation/Family Trailer and Best Foreign Graphics and a Golden Goblet at the Shanghai International Film Festival for Best Animation Film. It was also nominated for the People's Choice Award for Best Narrative Feature at Melbourne International Film Festival.

Continue: Loving Vincent Trailer

The Limehouse Golem Trailer

Long before the days of Jack the Ripper, there was another monster haunting the streets of London. A killer so terrible that locals dub him the Golem. Dan Leno, a real life theatre comedian, is for some reason dragged into the investigation by Inspector John Kildare of Scotland Yard, who is struggling to find a link between the murders. And he also enlists the help of a young woman named Elizabeth Cree whose terrified that she's next on the Golem's hit list. Kildare knows there is a witness, or witnesses, somewhere, and the Golem soon reveals that he is also aware that somebody knows who he is and leaves a warning that 'he who observes spills no less blood than he who inflicts the blow'.

Continue: The Limehouse Golem Trailer

Douglas Booth at the Three Empire Awards held at The Roundhouse - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 19th March 2017

Douglas Booth at The Fashion Awards 2016 held at the Royal Albert Hall - London, United Kingdom - Monday 5th December 2016

Douglas Booth seen at the 2016 British Independent Film Awards - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 4th December 2016

Douglas Booth on the red carpet at the 2016 IWC Gala in honour of The British Film Institute London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 4th October 2016

Douglas Booth seen arriving at the Serpentine Gallery Summer Party held at Kensington Gardens, London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 6th July 2016

Pride And Prejudice And Zombies - Teaser Trailer

In a world where the undead are waiting around every corner to tear you limb from limb, naturally you have worries more pressing than trying to penetrate the brooding aloofness of Mr Darcy. And yet, Elizabeth Bennet's dexterity in destroying zombies leaves her able to ponder the trivial moments of her life; not that potential marriage is regarded as such within the Bennet household. Elizabeth's parents are determined to wed their daughters to some wealthy newcomers, and while she isn't the prettiest of her sisters, her down-to-earth and bookish nature is enough to catch Mr Darcy's eye. But this isn't a straight-forward relationship; this couple have a lot of feelings to unlock while defending each other against flesh-eating fiends. Let's just hope death doesn't get in the way of what could truly be a match made in heaven.

Continue: Pride And Prejudice And Zombies - Teaser Trailer

Jupiter Ascending Review

By Rich Cline

Very Good

Filmmaking siblings Lana and Andy Wachowski never do anything by halves. The Matrix was a genre-changing blockbuster followed by two head-scratching sequels that ramped everything up a bit too much. Speed Racer was simply too much eye-candy for most viewers. And Cloud Atlas' intertwined storylines left audiences both exhausted and exhilarated. Now they've taken on the space action adventure with unfettered gusto, creating an utterly bonkers story that can't help but keep us thoroughly entertained.

So it turns out that Jupiter (Mila Kunis), an immigrant cleaner in Chicago, is actually the recurrence of a powerful matriarch whose empire runs the universe as a big business. Her three children (Eddie Redmayne, Douglas Booth and Tuppence Middleton) are tussling over control, because their mother's re-appearance changes their inheritance rights. Chased by bounty hunters, Jupiter is rescued by Caine (Channing Tatum) and his cohort Stinger (Sean Bean), who help her navigate the complex galactic society to claim her genetic rights. But each of the three children has plans for her. And as she zips back and forth across the universe, Jupiter realises that she's going to need to rise to the occasion if she wants to save herself. And Earth.

The Wachowskis clearly understand that the story is far too complicated to make much sense, so they only provide enough information to hold the audience's interest. Large plot threads and characters pop up and disappear at random, while Jupiter's own journey lurches through a series of contrived set-pieces and tense encounters that feel oddly unresolved. But none of that really matters, because the film is infused with a sardonic sense of humour that makes it enjoyable. Even the bad guys are intriguing; there's not much Redmayne can do with his leather-trousered grump, but at least he goes for it. Kunis has a great time with Jupiter's continual sexy costume changes, while Tatum performs a series of action scenes with his shirt off for no real reason. All of the cast members dive in without hesitation, using sheer charisma to make the characters a lot of fun to watch.

Continue reading: Jupiter Ascending Review

The Riot Club Review

By Rich Cline

Good

Solid acting and adept filmmaking help make up for the fact that this film asks us to spend a couple of hours in the presence of a group of truly despicable characters. They're played by some of the brightest (and most beautiful) rising stars in the movies at the moment, but each one of these young men is vile to the core. So the fact that these are supposed to be Britain's brightest and best hope for the future makes the film pretty terrifying.

It's set at Oxford University, where the elite Riot Club (including Douglas Booth, Sam Reid, Freddie Fox, Matthew Beard, Ben Schnetzer and Olly Alexander) are on the lookout for wealthy white students to complete their 10-man membership. They find suitable candidates in new arrivals: the sneering Alistair (Sam Claflin) and conflicted Miles (Max Irons), whose one drawback is that he's seeing a common girl (Holliday Grainger). After the rigorous initiation process, Alistair and Miles are welcomed to the hedonistic gang at a lavish dinner in the private room of a country pub. But things turn nasty as they drunkenly hurl abuse at the pub manager (Gordon Brown), his daughter (Jessica Brown Findlay) and a high-class hooker (Natalie Dormer) they hire for the night.

Based on the play Posh by screenwriter Laura Wade, the film is centred around this increasingly chaotic dinner party. Although nothing that happens is particularly surprising, because these young men are such relentlessly bigoted, misogynist snobs that it's impossible to believe they belong anywhere other than prison. They certainly don't deserve their self-appointed status as the top students at Oxford, who are getting debauchery out of their systems before taking the lead in British politics and business. But then, that's precisely Wade's point, and she makes it loudly. Thankfully, director Lone Scherfig balances things by offering glimpses into these young men's dark souls while skilfully capturing the old-world subculture and a strong sense of irony.

Continue reading: The Riot Club Review

The Riot Club Trailer

The Riot Club is an elite group of ten Oxford University students; the very best who are almost definitely going to go on to have successful futures. It's hundreds of years old and is notorious for their ritual drunken debauchery, lawlessness and often violent behaviour during their exclusive dinner parties each term. Their current president persuades a pub landlord and his daughter to let the club hire out the venue for the night, as long as he keeps things under control. However, it soon becomes clear that none of these young men are up for a quiet night when one of them hires a prostitute to 'entertain' them. She manages to make a quick escape when she realises what she's let herself in for though, and most of the club decide to take their frustrations out on the landlord and his daughter. Tragically, things get out of hand when one of the men seriously injures the landlord, causing the rest of them to panic. But with reputations at stake, who's going to blamed for it?

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Yoga, Painting, Boyfriends And Theatre: Emma Watson Looks To The Future Now Hermione’s Not Holding Her Back

By Lauren James in Movies / TV / Theatre on 05 April 2014

Emma Watson Russell Crowe Logan Lerman Darren Aronofsky Douglas Booth Jennifer Connelly

The 'Noah' actress and unexpected yogi sees a future for herself away from blockbusters.

Emma Watson has been doing a lot of pondering on the next stage of her life. The Noah actress is now on the brink of graduating in English Literature from Brown University and is looking forward to life as a graduate and devoting more time to her passions rather than starring in blockbusters and studying.


Emma Watson Says She's Looking Forward To Yoga, Art & Theatre After Graduating.

She said: ''When I finish my degree, I will have a lot more time to pursue other passions, and I want to figure out what those will be. I love having something completely unrelated to the film industry. I want to find something that will let me use my brain in another way. I like connecting people who aren't part of that industry," via Wonderland Magazine.

Continue reading: Yoga, Painting, Boyfriends And Theatre: Emma Watson Looks To The Future Now Hermione’s Not Holding Her Back

Noah Review

By Rich Cline

OK

Darren Aronofsky continues to ambitiously experiment with genres in this Old Testament blockbuster, but this is his first real misstep as a filmmaker, as the impressive parts simply don't add up. Still, there are flashes of genius as the epic struggle between good and evil is echoed both in the grand spectacle and within the characters themselves.

It starts with the original sin, which divides Adam and Eve's sons - brutal killer Cain and peaceful caretaker Seth - into warring factions. A few generations later, all that's left of Seth's righteous line is Noah (Russell Crowe), his wife (Jennifer Connelly) and three sons (Logan Lerman, Douglas Booth and Leo McHugh Carroll), plus an adopted daughter (Emma Watson). After he has a vision that God is planning to cleanse mankind with a flood, Noah consults his grandfather Methuselah (Anthony Hopkins) and builds an ark to save his family and all of earth's animals. He also gets help from the Watchers, rock-encrusted fallen angels who previously assisted Cain's descendant Tubal (Ray Winstone), who goes into battle mode to stop Noah.

All of this is inventively set in a post-apocalyptic landscape left in ruins after generations of fighting. And Noah is the last true believer tending to creation, refusing to eat meat (although he wears leather accessories) and ruling over his family like a tyrant. This of course creates various carefully scripted conflicts for his family over the months they're stuck in the ark. But the moralising is never as deep as it pretends to be.

Continue reading: Noah Review

'Noah' Storms Debut Box Office, Riding Wave Of Controversy To No.1

By Lauren James in Movies / TV / Theatre on 31 March 2014

Russell Crowe Darren Aronofsky Emma Watson Jennifer Connelly Douglas Booth

For Darren Aronofsky's 'Noah,' the prophecy has been fulfilled.

Noah has swept to success in its debut weekend, having opened in the USA. Darren Aronofsky's controversial new biblical epic took a massive $44 million over the weekend, which sent the film sailing past last week's number one movie, Divergent, according to Box Office Mojo. Russell Crowe takes the titular lead in this big budget hard-hitter, starring alongside Emma Watson, Jennifer Connelly and Douglas Booth.


New Russell Crowe Epic 'Noah' Has Swept To Success In Its Opening Weekend.

It hasn't all been plain sailing for the latest movie from the Black Swan director. Noah has faced religious opposition and subsequent bans in certain Middle Eastern countries due to the fear of religious provocation. What's more, early reviewers simply weren't fussed by Aronofsky's lengthy epic, yet this negativity seems to have been turned around since more Noah reviews have flooded in, sending the movie's Rotten Tomatoes rating skywards.

Continue reading: 'Noah' Storms Debut Box Office, Riding Wave Of Controversy To No.1