Ally Sheedy

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Ally Sheedy - 'The Breakfast Club' screening held at The Paramount Theater during SXSW in Austin - Arrivals at Paramount - Austin, Texas, United States - Monday 16th March 2015

Ally Sheedy
Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy
Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy
Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy
Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy
Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy

'The Breakfast Club' To Return To US Theatres For 30th Anniversary


Molly Ringwald Ally Sheedy Judd Nelson John Hughes The Breakfast Club Anthony Michael Hall

It’s been 30 years since John Hughes’ classic The Breakfast Club hit theatres and changed the teen movie landscape. So what better way is there to celebrate the iconic movie’s birthday, than by bringing it back to the cinemas for a whole new generation.

The Breakfast club castThe Breakfast Club cast reunited in 2010

A restored version of the film will be shown in 430 U.S. theatres for two nights on March 26th and 31st beginning at 7:30 p.m. local time, as part of ‘The Breakfast Club 30th Anniversary’ celebrations presented by Fathom Events, Universal Pictures Home Entertainment and BY Experience.

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Ally Sheedy - Disney On Ice presents 'Frozen' at The Barclay's Center in Brooklyn - Arrivals at Barclays Center, Disney - Brooklyn, New York, United States - Wednesday 12th November 2014

Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy

Ally Sheedy, Ahna O'Reilly, James Franco, Scott Haze, Allie Gallerani and Brian Lally - 'The Long Shrift' opening night party - Arrivals - New York, United States - Monday 14th July 2014

Ally Sheedy, Ahna O'reilly, James Franco, Scott Haze, Allie Gallerani and Brian Lally
James Franco and Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy, Ahna O'reilly, Robert Boswell, Scott Haze, Allie Gallerani and Brian Lally

Brian Lally, Ally Sheedy, Scott Haze, Ahna O'Reilly and Allie Gallerani - Opening night of The Long Shrift at the Rattlestick Playwrights Theater - Curtain Call. - New York, New York, United States - Monday 14th July 2014

Brian Lally, Ally Sheedy, Scott Haze, Ahna O'reilly and Allie Gallerani
Brian Lally, Ally Sheedy, Scott Haze, Ahna O'reilly and Allie Gallerani
Brian Lally, Ally Sheedy, Scott Haze, Ahna O'reilly and Allie Gallerani
Ally Sheedy, Brian Lally, Scott Haze, Ahna O'reilly and Allie Gallerani
Brian Lally, Ally Sheedy, Scott Haze, Ahna O'reilly and Allie Gallerani
Brian Lally, Ally Sheedy, Scott Haze, Ahna O'reilly and Allie Gallerani

Welcome To The Rileys Review


Very Good
Observant writing and direction make this exploration of grief surprisingly uplifting. This also gives the cast members the chance to play complex characters who engage our sympathies while never wallowing in their sadness.

Doug Riley (Gandolfini) and his wife Lois (Leo) have a quietly tense marriage that's infused with grief over the death of their teen daughter. So when Doug's mistress (Davis) dies suddenly, he doesn't know how to cope. Then he discovers that Lois has already bought their tombstone. On a business trip to New Orleans, he develops a tentative father-daughter relationship with young prostitute Mallory (Stewart). But while he's helping Mallory get back on her feet, Lois is in meltdown mode. So she stops taking her pills and drives to New Orleans.

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Ally Sheedy Saturday 14th May 2011 Farm Sanctuary's 25th Anniversary Gala at Cipriani Wall Street - Arrivals New York City, USA

Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy

Life During Wartime Review


Excellent
Solondz takes a sideways approach to this sequel to his 1998 hit Happiness.

With an all-new cast, it feels almost like a jazz riff, playing with the characters and themes and sending them in new directions. And it's both hilarious and clever.

When she realises that her husband (Williams) hasn't overcome his urge to make obscene phone calls, Joy (Henderson) heads to Florida to see her sister Trish (Janney), who has told everyone that her husband Bill (Hinds) has died. But he's actually in prison for abusing a young boy. Trish is now seeing a nice Jewish man (Lerner) and being a bit too honest with her son Timmy (Snyder).

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Perestroika Review


Excellent
Deeply personal, fiercely political, whimsical and unpredictable in style, and direct in voice, writer-director Slava Tsukerman's Perestroika resonates across personal, national, global, and even cosmic levels, all at once. After 17 years of self-imposed exile in America, renowned Jewish astrophysicist Sasha Greenburg returns to his hometown, Moscow, in 1992, the year that Perestroika ("restructuring") is sending shock waves through the social, cultural, and political life of Russia. Perestroika has meant greater political freedom, but it's a freedom without the infrastructure of purpose such that millions are flailing for opportunity. The young yearn for a vitality lacking in their cultural life, the elderly must live on measly pensions, the black market thrives, and vodka-rationing is causing widespread discontent in a nation rife with alcoholics.

Sasha (Sam Robards) has arrived here to address a conference on the structure of the universe -- his life-long obsession. The occasion reunites him with his testy old mentor, Professor Gross (F. Murray Abraham), and with Natasha (Oksana Stashenko), a former colleague and ex-lover who stirs up suspicions that Sasha may have fathered her teenage daughter before he left the country in the mid-'70s. The situation further compounds Sasha's midlife crisis: His marriage to Helen (Ally Sheedy), an American physicist, has fallen apart, and he's in the midst of a dead-end affair with another American, Jill (Jicky Schnee), a filmmaker accompanying him so she can gather newly declassified footage about the country's pollution crisis for her own environmental documentary.

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Harold Review


Bad
Late in the inept comedy Harold, the title character (Spencer Breslin) arrives at a friend's house, and the pal's father comes to the front door. A close-up lingers on the dad as if to say "Check it out, a really fun cameo!" The only problem is we have no idea who this actor is. And that's because he's not an actor -- he's the director's brother. If you think putting an unknown sibling in a movie is funny, stick around.

Despite Harold being remarkably amateurish, the concept is there, as you'd expect from a long-time Saturday Night Live veteran like director/co-writer T. Sean Shannon. A teenage kid named Harold has a bizarre case of early baldness and an attitude to match. He dresses horribly, walks with a hunched, old-man shuffle, and loves Murder, She Wrote. He's a cranky version of 14 Going on 74.

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Short Circuit Review


Weak
I am sure that, back in the mid-1980s, I wasn't alone in believing that we were just a lightning strike away from a robot becoming sentient. I probably wasn't alone in believing Fisher Stevens was a native-born Indian, too, but that's another matter.

You can thank Short Circuit for all of this. Massively successful and influential in its era, it's a story of an evil military corporation vs. one man. Or rather, one robot who thinks he's a man: The now-infamous Number 5.

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Day Zero Review


OK
The alternate reality in Day Zero is a nightmare for young American men: Within a backdrop of terrorist attacks and the Iraq War, the U.S. military draft has been reinstated. It's an intriguing concept, but it's stuck in a film that rarely digs deep, and never quite hits the mark.

Rather than investigate the larger, more challenging issues, first-time director Bryan Gunnar Cole keeps it small and personal, focusing on three buddies: a wimpy author (Elijah Wood, continuing to shed Frodo), a suit-and-tied attorney (the stale Chris Klein) and a streetwise cabbie (uneven Jon Bernthal). Each receives his notice at the same time, with 30 days to report for service. And with the first scenes featuring the trio, it's tough to believe they'd ever been friends -- sadly, they just seem like three actors pretending to be friends, proof that on-screen camaraderie can be a bitch to achieve.

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Highball Review


Good
Noah Baumbach gathered up his Kicking and Screaming and Mr. Jealousy buddies and threw together this little flick in six days. He then stuck an alias (Ernie Fusco) on it, and that was about it. Mostly consisting of recycled jokes that didn't make it into his earlier films, Highball is still frequently funny while it's perpetually random. Gotta love Carlos Jacott no matter what he does, though. And extra points for creative use of two giant lizard suits.

I'll Take You There Review


Very Good
It only takes a few minutes to see Hal Harley's influence on his frequent starlet Adrienne Shelly in this, her fourth outing as an indie writer/director. This quirky tale -- difficult to explain but easy to follow -- has Ally Sheedy kidnapping a lovelorn Reg Rogers while he tries to get to the girlfriend that just ran off with his best friend. Shelly appears to provide help (and self-help), and a nutty road trip through Sheedy's neo-psychotic past and present ensues. Interesting and sometimes hysterical, but the direction is rather pedestrian and the story, strangely enough, just doesn't come off as that original. Go figure.

The Breakfast Club Review


Good
Like a group therapy session with no psychologist in sight (unless that scary principal counts), The Breakfast Club is often considered the Most Meaningful of all the John Hughes teen movies. And while that very well might be the case, that doesn't necessarily make it the best of those movies; that prize would most likely have to go to Sixteen Candles or Pretty in Pink. But one thing that must be said about The Breakfast Club is that it doesn't quite resemble any other teen movie done before or since, a more impressive feat than you might think.

The idea is impressively theatrical for a teen movie: Five teens show up at Shermer High School for Saturday detention, where they'll have to write an essay on who they think they are. All the kids represent different archetypes, of course, and by the end of the day, they'll all have exposed each other's fears and learned that, for all their supposed differences, there really isn't that much that separates them.

Continue reading: The Breakfast Club Review

Ally Sheedy

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Ally Sheedy Movies

Welcome to the Rileys Movie Review

Welcome to the Rileys Movie Review

Observant writing and direction make this exploration of grief surprisingly uplifting. This also gives the...

Life During Wartime Movie Review

Life During Wartime Movie Review

Solondz takes a sideways approach to this sequel to his 1998 hit Happiness. With an...

Harold Movie Review

Harold Movie Review

Late in the inept comedy Harold, the title character (Spencer Breslin) arrives at a friend's...

Day Zero Movie Review

Day Zero Movie Review

The alternate reality in Day Zero is a nightmare for young American men: Within a...

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