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Allison Janney - 41st Annual Gracie Awards Gala held at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel - Arrivals at Beverly Wilshire Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 24th May 2016

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Allison Janney - 41st Annual Gracie Awards Gala held at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 24th May 2016

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Girl On The Train Trailer


The protagonist Rachel Watson (Emily Blunt) in The Girl On The Train is a troubled woman who isn't coping with the divorce from her ex-husband and subsequently becomes involved in the investigation to the murder of Megan Hipwell. In this chilling thriller based on Paula Hawkins' bestselling novel we follow the story of Rachel and her internal battle of being afraid of herself and what she is capable of doing.

Continue: Girl On The Train Trailer

Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children Trailer


Jake has always been an ordinary boy but when he finds himself on a small island, things begin to happen that few people would be able to explain. His new friend, a beautiful young girl named Emma seems to be able to perform miraculous occurrences start to happen. 

Things become a little clearer - yet utterly more baffling - when he's taken to meet Miss Peregrine at her exceptional orphanage for children. As Jacob is quick to learn, each of Miss Peregrine's kids has a special ability, something unique to them. Emma can control oxygen and must wear hefty boots to keep her feet firmly attached to the ground, whilst Bronwyn is a little girl with incredible physical strength. 

Miss Peregrine is the protector of the children and acts as their matriarch. To keep them safe she's formulated a way of manipulating time to keep the kids away from dangerous monsters who hunt them down - however, as the dark forces become stronger the Children are placed in more and more danger - unbeknownst to Jacob, perhaps he holds the key to keeping his new friends safe. 

Allison Janney - American Friends Of The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra Duet Gala at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 10th November 2015

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney and Philip Joncas
Allison Janney and Philip Joncas

Allison Janney - 7th Annual Club Tacori Riviera held at the Tropicana Bar at The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel - Arrivals at The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 6th October 2015

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Allison Janney - Tacori Presents Riviera at The Roosevelt at Tropicana Bar at The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel - Arrivals at Tropicana Pool at The Roosevelt Hotel, Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 6th October 2015

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Allison Janney - 67th Annual Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theatre at Microsoft Theatre, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Allison Janney - 67th Primetime Emmy Awards - Press Room at Microsoft Theater at LA Live, Primetime Emmy Awards, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st September 2015

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Allison Janney - 2015 Primetime Creative Emmy Awards - Red Carpet Arrivals at Microsoft Theater at LA Live, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 12th September 2015

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Allison Janney - 2015 Creative Arts Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater - Arrivals at Microsoft Theater, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 12th September 2015

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Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Allison Janney - CBS, CW And Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center - Arrivals at Pacific Design Center - West Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 11th August 2015

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

The Rewrite Trailer


Keith Michaels once had it all; recognition and money from an award-winning screenplay and an attractive wife to share it with. However, now he's nearing middle-age and he no longer seems to have any of it. Sure, his famed movie is still a hit, but he's struggling to find any more work and now that he's sadly divorced, the only support he has is from his agent. Desperate to make ends meet, the agent offers him last resort; there's a teaching post vacancy at a small town university in Binghamton, available to teachers in screenwriting. With a Golden Globe hit under his belt, he's a sure-fire candidate for the job - but it's the last thing he wants to do. However, he soon finds the silver lining in that a string of attractive young students have applied to enrol on his course and he uses the opportunity to revel amongst young women, while doing as little work as possible. When he meets mature student Holly though, he's inspired to turn his spiralling life back around.

Continue: The Rewrite Trailer

Creative Primetime Emmy Awards 2014 [Pictures]


Allison Janney James Lipton Bryan Cranston Benedict Cumberbatch Martin Freeman Game Of Thrones HBO

The stars stepped out onto the red carpet for one of the glitziest ceremonies of awards season: the Creative Primetime Emmys.

Having previously won for NBC's political drama 'The West Wing' as White House press secretary C.J. Cregg, Allison Janney’s award for outstanding guest actress in a drama series for her role in Masters of Sex, which also stars Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan, was a particular highlight. 

Backstage, Janney highlighted that playing Margeret Scully was certainly challenging at times. "I felt that Margaret Scully challenged me in ways that I've never been challenged before as an actress on so many levels - on an emotional level, on a physical level - and having to do sex scenes was extraordinarily nerve-wracking and stressful for me and something that I didn't think I'd have to do at this age, frankly," she explained.

Continue reading: Creative Primetime Emmy Awards 2014 [Pictures]

Allison Janney - CW, CBS and Showtime's 2013 Summer TCA Party - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 29th July 2013

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Review Roundup: The Way, Way Back Charms Critics With Subtlety And Simplicity


Steve Carell Toni Collette Allison Janney Liam James

The Way Way Back – a light, heart-warming comedy in the midst of an action-packed summer blockbuster season, saw its world premiere last month. The film hits US theatres (as a limited release) tomorrow, June 5th and there are already a number of opinions from critics floating around the internet.

Check out more photos from the film's premiere.

Tony Collette, The Way Way Back Premiere
Tony Collette stars as an out-of-touch mother in this one.

Continue reading: Review Roundup: The Way, Way Back Charms Critics With Subtlety And Simplicity

Dule Hill and Allison Janney - World premiere of 'Michael Jackson One' at Mandalay Bay Hotel & Casino - Arrivals - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Saturday 29th June 2013

Dule Hill and Allison Janney
Dule Hill
Dule Hill and Allison Janney
Dule Hill and Alfre Woodard
Dule Hill
Dule Hill and Allison Janney

Allison Janney - United Friends of the Children Brass Ring Awards 2013 held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Inside - Beverley Hills, California, United States - Thursday 30th May 2013

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Sherry Elizabeth Walker and Allison Janney
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Allison Janney

Video - Sarah Michelle Gellar, Robin Williams And Anna Faris Make An Appearance At CBS Upfront 2013 - Part 2


The biggest stars of the CBS network including 'The Crazy Ones' actors Sarah Michelle Gellar and Robin Williams, and 'Mom' stars Anna Faris and Allison Janney were snapped on the red carpet the CBS Upfront 2013 event. Sarah is photographed kissing Robin on the cheek which makes one paparazzo shout, 'Get a room!'

Continue: Video - Sarah Michelle Gellar, Robin Williams And Anna Faris Make An Appearance At CBS Upfront 2013 - Part 2

Video - CBS CEO Les Moonves Joined By Wife Julie Chen, Will Arnett And LL Cool J At CBS Upfront 2013 - Part 3


CBS CEO Les Moonves and his wife 'The Talk' host Julie Chen were among red carpet arrivals at the 2012 CBS Upfront Presentation along with Will Arnett, who will appear in the new CBS sitcom 'The Millers', and 'NCIS: Los Angeles' star LL Cool J.

Continue: Video - CBS CEO Les Moonves Joined By Wife Julie Chen, Will Arnett And LL Cool J At CBS Upfront 2013 - Part 3

The Way, Way Back Trailer


Duncan is a 14-year-old boy struggling to fit in anywhere and dealing with all the problems that most teenagers are forced to deal with at some stage. His mother Pam has a new boyfriend, Trent, who happens to be a jerk with a keen interest in humiliating Duncan at every opportunity. As the summer nears, the family embark on a vacation at Trent's beach house where he meets their new neighbour's daughter Susanna who, far from seeing him as a socially awkward and embarrassing individual, warms to Duncan immediately. He also meets the unprofessional and extroverted manager of the Water Wizz water park, Owen, who offers him a job and some excitement on his otherwise uninteresting vacation and subsequently helps him grow in confidence and self-belief. 

Continue: The Way, Way Back Trailer

Finding Nemo 3D Trailer


Marlin is a clown fish with deep anxiety issues who lives alone with his sheltered son Nemo who has just started school. His over-protectiveness coupled with peer pressure soon drives Nemo to become a little more daring, however, and he ends up being captured and taken all the way to Sydney. Determined not to lose his beloved son, Marlin sets out on a death-defying adventure with a Blue Tang fish called Dory who suffers from short term memory loss. With danger at every turn, Marlin braves the open ocean and discovers a sense of courage and self-worth he never knew he had. 

'Finding Nemo' was directed by Oscar winners Andrew Stanton ('WALL-E', 'John Carter') and Lee Unkrich ('Monsters, Inc. ', 'Toy Story 2') and written by Bob Peterson ('Up') and David Reynolds (additional writer for 'A Bug's Life'). It became both a commercial and critical success on its release through Pixar in 2003 grossing $921,743,261 worldwide and was nominated for two BAFTAs and a Golden Globe and won an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature. It was this major appeal that has prompted a re-release in stunning 3D almost ten years later. 'Finding Nemo 3D' will hit cinemas on March 29th 2013.

Director: Andrew Stanton

Continue: Finding Nemo 3D Trailer

The Oranges Review


OK

There's plenty of potential for jagged black humour in this suburban comedy-drama, but the filmmakers never take a single risk. So with its soft and simplistic approach, the movie is never as quirky or hilarious as it should have been, or as the filmmakers seem to think it is. The only pleasure in watching it comes through understated touches the gifted cast members manage to inject here and there. And what a great cast!

It's set in West Orange, New Jersey, where two families have been best friends for decades. David and Paige Walling (Laurie and Keener) have two grown children: Vanessa (Shawkat) lives at home while Toby (Brody) drops in to visit every now and then. Across the street are the Ostroffs, Terry and Carol (Platt and Janney), whose wayward daughter Nina (Meester) is home for Thanksgiving. Everyone thinks a romance between Toby and Nina would be wonderful. But as the Wallings try to work out some marital problems, it's David who drifts into a transgressive affair with Nina. Which sends these long-time friendships into spiralling chaos.

The plot is so perfectly suited to a black comedy that we wonder what happened along the way. Director Farino smooths every edge, instead straining for silly farce that leads to some sort of emotional catharsis. But he fails to recognise that these people are all intelligent adults, so the fallout from David and Nina's fling feels contrived and obvious. The script also never makes us feel like they are doing anything besides reacting to their previous relationships: this isn't real love, so why should we care?

Continue reading: The Oranges Review

Allison Janney Monday 15th October 2012 ELLE's 19th Annual Women In Hollywood Celebration held at Four Seasons Hotel

Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Video - Oliver Platt And Allison Janney Loved Working Together On 'The Oranges'


Oliver Platt and Allison Janney who play Terry and Carol Ostroff in the romantic comedy 'The Oranges' attend a press junket for the movie in New York City and discuss the fun things they did on set between scenes and while the cameras were rolling.

Continue: Video - Oliver Platt And Allison Janney Loved Working Together On 'The Oranges'

The Oranges Trailer


David Walling and Terry Ostroff are totally inseparable. Living across the street from each other in the beautiful town of West Orange, New Jersey, both patriarchs bring their families together at every available opportunity and every single year to celebrate Thanksgiving. When 24-year-old Ostroff daughter Nina comes home to join in the festivities for the first time in five years after splitting up with her fiancé, both families secretly have hopes that she and Walling son Toby might get together. However, there is a shocking turn of events when Nina's suspicious mother Cathy follows her as she leaves the house with a mysterious person and turns up at a motel. Outside, Cathy runs into David and her daughter and both struggle to explain what's going on. They have inadvertently fallen for one another and, as their attraction grows ever stronger, the two inseparable families face are suddenly faced with conflict and heartbreak.

Continue: The Oranges Trailer

Allison Janney Thursday 12th January 2012 17th Annual Critic's Choice Movie Awards - Pressroom

Viola Davis, Allison Janney, Chris Lowell, Cicely Tyson, Emma Stone, Jessica Chastain and Octavia Spencer
Viola Davis, Allison Janney, Emma Stone and Jessica Chastain
Viola Davis, Allison Janney, Emma Stone and Jessica Chastain
Viola Davis, Allison Janney, Emma Stone and Jessica Chastain
Viola Davis, Allison Janney, Emma Stone and Jessica Chastain

Margaret Review


Excellent
Shot in 2005, Lonergan's film spent six years in legal and editorial limbo. It may be overlong, but it's a powerfully involving exploration of guilt and self-discovery. It's also packed with astonishingly complex characters and situations.

Lisa (Paquin) is a Manhattan teen living with her single mother Joan (Smith-Cameron), an actress starring in her breakout stage role while seeing a new man (Reno). One day Lisa distracts a bus driver (Ruffalo), who hits a woman (Janney) in the street, an accident that sends Lisa into a spiral of sublimated guilt, as she lashes out in different ways at a nice classmate (Gallagher), her teachers (Damon and Broderick) and mostly her mother. And she doesn't stop there, meddling in people's lives in her effort to achieve a sense of justice.

Continue reading: Margaret Review

A Thousand Words Trailer


Jack McCall is a literary agent who has a way with words. He knows just what to say to use any situation to his advantage. For example: after joining a long queue at his favourite coffee shop, Jack became impatient and faked an emergency phone call in order to get himself to the front.

Continue: A Thousand Words Trailer

The Help Review


Excellent
A strongly issue-based story gives a terrific cast plenty to play with in this hugely engaging drama about the American South in the 1960s. And while the film kind of skims the surface, it's a story that still needs to be told.

After graduating from university, Skeeter (Stone) returns home to Jackson, Mississippi, to seek work as a journalist. But one theme from her childhood haunts her: the maid (Tyson) who actually raised her. But her similarly raised close friends (Howard, O'Reilly and Camp) now take their own maids for granted, and Skeeter wonders why this story has never been told from the help's point of view. After finding an interested New York editor (Steenburgen), it takes awhile to convince Aibileen (Davis) to tell her story, especially as both know it will upset the status quo.

Continue reading: The Help Review

The Help Trailer


Skeeter has always dreamt of becoming a writer; fresh out of college she attempts to get a job at one of New York's best publishing houses but unfortunately isn't successful at landing the job. Returning home she starts to write a column for the local news paper but is distracted by personal matters when she learns that the family maid, who raised Skeeter, has gone missing.

Continue: The Help Trailer

Life During Wartime Review


Excellent
Solondz takes a sideways approach to this sequel to his 1998 hit Happiness.

With an all-new cast, it feels almost like a jazz riff, playing with the characters and themes and sending them in new directions. And it's both hilarious and clever.

When she realises that her husband (Williams) hasn't overcome his urge to make obscene phone calls, Joy (Henderson) heads to Florida to see her sister Trish (Janney), who has told everyone that her husband Bill (Hinds) has died. But he's actually in prison for abusing a young boy. Trish is now seeing a nice Jewish man (Lerner) and being a bit too honest with her son Timmy (Snyder).

Continue reading: Life During Wartime Review

Allison Janney Tuesday 27th October 2009 Michael Jackson's 'This Is It' Premiere at the Nokia Theatre - Arrivals Los Angeles, Cailfornia

Allison Janney

Away We Go Review


Good
This gentle comedy examines at how we set priorities, plan our futures and make our families. It's sweet and superficial, but the meandering pace and lively characters make it just about watchable.

Burt and Verona (Krasinski and Rudolph) are a sparky couple looking forward to the birth of their first child. But when Burt's nutty parents (O'Hara and Daniels) announce that they're suddenly moving to Belgium, Burt and Verona realise that nothing is holding them in Colorado. So they hit the road, visiting friends and siblings in Arizona, Wisconsin, Montreal and Miami. In each place, they see things they want for their own family home, but everyone they visit is full of surprises.

Continue reading: Away We Go Review

Away We Go Review


OK
The fifth film by British theater director Sam Mendes, Away We Go, is the most unkempt movie the director has made so far in his career. It was made while he was still in post-production for last year's excellent adaptation of Richard Yates' Revolutionary Road, a film that was dependent on its form and staginess, and there's a sense that Away was made as a sort of counterpoint not only to the familial dread of Road but also to its style.

It is also the screenwriting debut of the wildly post-modern novelist Dave Eggers and his wife Vendela Vida, novelist and co-founder of literary zine The Believer. Being the recent parents of two children, there's certainly a self-reflexive quality to their script, which tells of the travels of a pair of expecting parents attempting to find a proper home for their awaited progeny.

Continue reading: Away We Go Review

Allison Janney - Saturday 23rd February 2008 at Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica, California

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Allison Janney
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Allison Janney

Allison Janney Friday 1st February 2008 Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Fall 2008 - Red Dress Fashion Show - Catwalk New York City, USA

Allison Janney - Saturday 12th January 2008 at BAFTA Beverly Hills, California

Allison Janney
Allison Janney

Allison Janney - Thursday 1st May 2008 at Palm Springs Convention Center Palm Springs Convention Center, California USA

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Allison Janney
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Allison Janney

Juno Review


Excellent
Ellen Page plays a quirky teenager in Jason Reitman's Juno but she does so in a way I've rarely witnessed before. She's not rebelling from medication like Natalie Portman in Garden State, nor is she just a normal, shy girl who is externally quirky like Tina Majorino in Napoleon Dynamite. Her peculiarities aren't her definition like Ally Sheedy in The Breakfast Club, and she's not flippantly cute and brazenly poetic like Zooey Deschanel in Paul Gordon Green's All the Real Girls. Page's Juno MacGuff certainly has hints of all these characters, but what we witness of her comes from somewhere far off-screen. Remarkably, the world we're watching doesn't revolve around her.

When this Argento-loving firecracker gets knocked up by Paulie Bleeker (the invaluable Michael Cera), her rhythms don't change much; a big cookie consumed simultaneously with a lamb kebob seems like something she'd eat even if her hormones weren't all akimbo. After chatting up an ex-pill popper/current pro-lifer, her attempts to procure an abortion are thwarted by the thought of her baby's tapping fingernails and the sterilized miasma of the clinic's waiting room. Hastily, she opts for an old-fashioned, at-birth adoption with no frills. Her parents, played lovingly by J.K. Simmons and Allison Janney, are concerned but surprisingly level-headed, even if they wished she had just gotten a DUI instead of getting knocked up.

Continue reading: Juno Review

The West Wing: Season Six Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Season Six Review

Winter Solstice Review


Weak
The plot in Winter Solstice is more of a subplot, never mind a feature length movie. And that's one of the many problems in writer/director Josh Sternfeld's sluggish account of a New Jersey family under stress.

Anthony LaPaglia plays Jim Winters, a widower living with his two sons, Gabe (Aaron Stanford), a hard-working young man; and Pete (Mark Webber), a teenager who can't get his act together. The three are a tight unit, but the bond between them strains when Gabe suddenly announces he's moving to Florida and Pete faces yet another stint at summer school.

Continue reading: Winter Solstice Review

Piccadilly Jim Review


Weak
A rather hysterical oddity that can't decide what era it's set in or what mood to play, Piccadilly Jim just chucks it all at the screen and hopes that some wit will come through and generate some laughs. Fortunately for the audience, some of it does - unfortunately for the film, not nearly enough.

Based on P.G. Wodehouse's novel, the film concerns the exploits of one Jim Crocker (Sam Rockwell), a young wastrel whose social-climbing American mother (Allison Janney, sharp as a tack) has forced him and his father (Tom Wilkinson), a failed British actor, to live in London and try and impress the swells there. She does this just to tick off her competitive sister, Nesta (Brenda Blethyn), a fact not wasted on the men of the family. Spoiling his mother's plans is Jim's penchant to booze it up all over town, getting into fistfights and leaving flappers scattered about the house and in his bed. Jim decides to ostensibly reform his wayward ways when he meets Nesta's step-niece Anne (Frances O'Connor), who won't have anything to do with him unless he pretends to be someone else - Jim once wrote a gossip column under the name "Piccadilly Jim", and once someone else writing the column (he hasn't worked on it for years) gave a negative review to a collection of Anne's poems. Jim thusly does the only sensible thing a fellow could do: He pretends to be a teetotaler Christian named Algernon Bayliss. Somehow, along the way, a German spy and some scientific secrets come into play, but one would be well-served to not wonder how.

Continue reading: Piccadilly Jim Review

The West Wing: Sixth Season Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Sixth Season Review

The Chumscrubber Review


Bad
The starry-eyed cross-breed of American Beauty and Donnie Darko, here comes The Chumscrubber, another self-righteous satire on self-absorbed parents and their estranged offspring. With the over-extended reach of a callow teenager, it fails to conquer its peaks of social relevancy. But it does have a titular headless video-game anti-hero, who, like the film's residents, uses his head as a weapon and presides over the film like a post-apocalyptic master-of-ceremonies.

A facetious voice-over -- "This was the best of all possible worlds" -- introduces brooding loner Dean Stiffle (Jamie Bell of Billy Elliot), a teen caught between dueling self-helper parents, who's soon to discover his dead friend Troy (Josh Janowicz) behind the house of his party-throwing mother, Carrie (Glenn Close). Weeks later, Dean's best-selling psychiatrist-author father, Bill (William Fichtner), therapy-talks Dean sick about his lack of grief. Dad's cure: More of the same pharmaceuticals Dean's school's already drowning in.

Continue reading: The Chumscrubber Review

Nurse Betty Review


Excellent
Neil LaBute, best known for his ultra-dark comedies In the Company of Men and Your Friends and Neighbors, breaks from his traditional mold and lightens up a tad with Nurse Betty, which -- again -- isn't going to win any awards for sensitivity.

For the first time, LaBute is not directing from his own script, which might explain why, if I didn't know better, I would have sworn I was watching a Coen brothers movie. Who else would put a fantasy dancing sequence on the edge of the Grand Canyon at night?

Continue reading: Nurse Betty Review

Finding Nemo Review


Extraordinary
The Pixar logo - which is the company's name with a desk lamp in place of the "I" - has become the cinematic equivalent of a "Prime" stamp on a side of beef. Once we see it, we know we're in for breathtaking animation, clever scripts, and wholesome family entertainment. The cynic in me waits for the geniuses responsible for the Toy Story features, A Bug's Life, and Monsters, Inc. to slip up and release a flop. Looks like I'll be waiting a few more years.

The latest Pixar pearl, Finding Nemo, ventures under the sea, where single dad Marlin (voice of Albert Brooks) overprotects his only son, Nemo (voice of Alexander Gould). One day, Nemo wades into uncharted waters on a dare, only to be snatched up by a scuba diver and placed in the tank of an Australian dentist. For the remainder of the film, Marlin and a forgetful fish named Dory (voice of Ellen DeGeneres) scour the ocean floor in an effort to bring Nemo home, a task that's easier said than done.

Continue reading: Finding Nemo Review

The Impostors Review


Very Good
A charming and funny farce, obviously the brainchild of Tucci on peyote (or something akin), The Impostors lacks the magic of a film like Big Night, but still makes you smile plenty. A host of indie regulars round out the cast, which features Platt and Tucci as hapless actors stranded on a cruise liner.

American Beauty Review


Extraordinary
At last, a movie with no likable characters that is nothing short of a joy to watch. Let's see if American Psycho can top that!

American Beauty chronicles the last year in the life of 42 year-old hack magazine writer Lester Burnham (Spacey), a suburban loser that has just about had it with his humdrum life and decides to make a few changes to regain control, for better or for worse. Those changes include quitting his job and blackmailing his employers, buying a vintage Firebird, taking a new job at the local fast food joint, buying thousands of dollars worth of pot, and plotting to sleep with his daughter's best friend (Suvari, the good girl from American Pie, playing the bad girl here).

Continue reading: American Beauty Review

How To Deal Review


Terrible
You could take a camcorder to the mall, videotape strangers at random, and end up with a better movie than Mandy Moore's How to Deal. Soggy and melodramatic, this mess aims to address the obstacles we encounter en route to romance. But a pessimistic mood causes the picture to drag its feet. Staged without an ounce of genuine sentiment, Deal makes Britney Spears' dismal Crossroads look like Casablanca.

Screenwriter Neena Beber draws inspiration from two separate Sarah Dessen novels, but can't squeeze one decent movie out of the material. In only her second starring role, Moore plays Halley Martin, a disillusioned high schooler learning how to deal with a lifetime's worth of problems. Halley's divorced dad (Peter Gallagher) has a new fiancée, while her mom (Allison Janney) is still coping with the split. Her best friend, Scarlett (Alexandra Holden), is pregnant, and her older sister's pending nuptials appear doomed from the start. Out of the blue, Halley is falling for a detached hunk (Trent Ford) who might be able to convince her that true love exists.

Continue reading: How To Deal Review

Winter Solstice Review


Weak
The plot in Winter Solstice is more of a subplot, never mind a feature length movie. And that's one of the many problems in writer/director Josh Sternfeld's sluggish account of a New Jersey family under stress.

Anthony LaPaglia plays Jim Winters, a widower living with his two sons, Gabe (Aaron Stanford), a hard-working young man; and Pete (Mark Webber), a teenager who can't get his act together. The three are a tight unit, but the bond between them strains when Gabe suddenly announces he's moving to Florida and Pete faces yet another stint at summer school.

Continue reading: Winter Solstice Review

Six Days, Seven Nights Review


Good
Slightly underrated, and I mean slightly... this precocious romantic comedy is all over the map, er, so to speak, when gruff 50+er Ford hooks up with 20something Heche after he crashes his plane on a deserted, tropical island. This couple is as opposite as it gets, but watch out, because in crazy times you never know who's going to fall for their complete opposite! The plot is lifted wholesale from The African Queen, sans the Bogart/Hepburn chemistry, but the addition of the subplot of the intermingling of the significant others left behind actually makes the film quite giddy. Sure, Schwimmer and Obradors make for an even less likely couple, and don't get me started on "the pirates." But hey, it's not the worst flick than any of the principals have made, not by a long shot.

Piccadilly Jim Review


Weak
A rather hysterical oddity that can't decide what era it's set in or what mood to play, Piccadilly Jim just chucks it all at the screen and hopes that some wit will come through and generate some laughs. Fortunately for the audience, some of it does - unfortunately for the film, not nearly enough.

Based on P.G. Wodehouse's novel, the film concerns the exploits of one Jim Crocker (Sam Rockwell), a young wastrel whose social-climbing American mother (Allison Janney, sharp as a tack) has forced him and his father (Tom Wilkinson), a failed British actor, to live in London and try and impress the swells there. She does this just to tick off her competitive sister, Nesta (Brenda Blethyn), a fact not wasted on the men of the family. Spoiling his mother's plans is Jim's penchant to booze it up all over town, getting into fistfights and leaving flappers scattered about the house and in his bed. Jim decides to ostensibly reform his wayward ways when he meets Nesta's step-niece Anne (Frances O'Connor), who won't have anything to do with him unless he pretends to be someone else - Jim once wrote a gossip column under the name "Piccadilly Jim", and once someone else writing the column (he hasn't worked on it for years) gave a negative review to a collection of Anne's poems. Jim thusly does the only sensible thing a fellow could do: He pretends to be a teetotaler Christian named Algernon Bayliss. Somehow, along the way, a German spy and some scientific secrets come into play, but one would be well-served to not wonder how.

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American Beauty Review


Excellent

Every time I see a new Kevin Spacey movie, I expect the world from him, and every time he delivers the galaxy.

Arguably the greatest actor currently working in motion pictures, he is capable of putting across leagues of depth with the subtlest, most insignificant glance. He can play menacing or meek, ardent or indifferent, nervous or non-nonchalant with equal dexterity.

Look at "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil," "The Negotiator," "L.A. Confidential," "The Usual Suspects" or any of his recent roles and just try to imagine another actor in the part. It simply can't be done. Spacey doesn't act, he embodies his characters viscerally from the inside out.

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Drop Dead Gorgeous Review


Weak

Leaning hard into ham-fisted mockery of beauty pageants and Midwesterners, "Drop Dead Gorgeous" is an exercise in frustration.

It's frustrating because this mocumentary condemnation of the objectification of teenage girls is ripe with thick, delicious layers of irony, but director Michael Patrick Jann -- whose background is in sketch comedy -- allows that irony to be beaten to death by cheap, madcap overacting.

Following two frontrunners in the fictional American Teen Princess Pageant, "Gorgeous" applies its comedy with all the precision of a paint roller. Wide swaths of disposable laughs come from parading the absurdly varied and one-dimensional contestants before the camera. There's a showtune freak with a drag queen brother, a fat chick, an American girl adopted by Japanese immigrants, a brainiac who wants to do a Shakespeare soliloquy in the talent competition, an interpretive dancer and a soccer dyke -- whose death in a farming accident sets up the plot, revolving around how far one girl might go to win.

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10 Things I Hate About You Review


OK



There's just no excuse for making a Shakespeare knock-off with "Savedby the Bell" quality dialogue. When a movie modernizes The Bard, evenif it's set it in a high school, the chief obligation is to dialogue aboveall else.

"10 Things I Hate About You" -- a "Clueless"-spawnremake of "The Taming of the Shrew" -- while an above averageentry in the recent pool of teen-targeted pics, is sorely lacking in thisarena.

Penned by two office temps-cum-screenwriters and directedby a feature film rookie (Gil Junger) as well, "10 Things" isa bright idea (I'm always an advocate of fiddling with Shakespeare), butit is an interpretation without poetry or rhythm, occasionally cashingin on multi-syllabic, Scrabble-winning words in a misguided attempt tomake its characters look rebelliously intellectual.

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Nurse Betty Review


Good

Heretofore known for his viciously incisive, very black socio-sexual satires, director Neil LaBute takes a joyride in antic comedy territory with "Nurse Betty." It's charming effort of pure entertainment about a gentle, bouncy Kansas waitress who becomes convinced she's a part of her favorite soap opera after being sent into post-traumatic shock by witnessing a murder.

The murder was that of her abusive, redneck husband (LaBute regular Aaron Eckhart in another amazing chameleon performance) -- a retribution for a shady business deal gone wrong.

The waitress, Betty Sizemore, is the kind of bona fide wide-eyed innocent most Hollywood actresses wouldn't be able to play without slipping into a hammy, ignorant hayseed routine and winking ironically at the audience. But in the hands of Renée Zellweger -- who proved her sweetheart credibility in "Jerry Maguire" -- Betty is 100 percent genuine sugar.

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How To Deal Review


OK

Having seen her parents divorced, her pouty perfectionist sister engaged to a bland country-club preppie and her knocked-up best friend suffer a terrible romantic tragedy, Halley Martin is one high school girl very wary of love.

As played by pop- princess- cum- promising- actress Mandy Moore, she's also a credible Everyteen with a good head on her shoulders, which is what makes her determination to guard her heart a sound basis for "How to Deal," a fluffy slice-of-teen-life drama that strives to raise the bar a little for its often eye-rolling genre.

Adapted from the youth novels "Someone Like You" and "That Summer" by Sarah Dessen, the film is an admirable step up from the superficial, soundtrack-driven tripe usually targeted to the MTV demographic, and Moore's appealing, unaffected authenticity buttresses the story in its weaker passages.

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Finding Nemo Review


Good
Offering further proof that the folks at Pixar are ceaselessly, unflaggingly more clever and imaginative than anyone else working in big-budget feature animation, the underwater CGI-animated "Finding Nemo" opens today -- and it's smarter, funnier and more entertaining than any other all-ages film so far this year.While Disney's in-house animators have been assembly-lining prosaic sequels ("The Jungle Book 2," "Return to Never Land") and re-imagined misfires ("Treasure Planet") -- and very occasionally coloring a little bit outside the lines ("Lilo and Stitch") -- the computer-'toon platoon at Pixar's Emeryville, California studios is supplying the Mouse House with delightfully creative products like "Monster's Inc." and this new adventure, in which an apprehensive, over-protective clown-fish father traverses the sea in search of his missing son.

The youngster was scooped up near his reef home by some monstrous, two-legged land creature in scuba gear and deposited into a Australian dentist's fish tank, populated by a colorful crew of fellow captives who help little Nemo (voice of Alexander Gould) hatch an escape plan. In the meantime, Marlin -- his fretful father with the perfectly anxiety-ridden intonations of Albert Brooks -- ventures deeper into the deep blue than he has ever dared before, determined to find the boy.

Helped along the way, if "helped" is the word for it, by a dingbat blue tang with short-term memory problems (and the oh-so-apropos voice of Ellen DeGeneres), Marlin finds his courage in dangerous adventures (mines and shipwrecks) and discovers friends in the forms of a surfer-dude sea turtle (voiced by Andrew Stanton, the movie's director), an astute pelican (Geoffrey Rush) who becomes his transportation into the dentist's office, and a trio of 12-stepping sharks who are trying to go vegetarian (including future "Hulk" Eric Bana and Barry Humphries, aka "Dame Edna").

Resourceful in its storytelling (the East Australian Current which Marlin must travel is akin to an underwater freeway crossed with a roller coaster) and reliably, steadily hilarious ("Hey, you're a clown fish," observe all the dopier sea critters who meet mopey Marlin. "Tell us a joke!"), "Finding Nemo" is also astounding to look at. Like a fantastical scuba dive, the picture's always-in-motion undersea universe would be downright photo-realistic if Stanton and his animators hadn't dialed up the cartoonishness just enough to give all the fish googly ping-pong-ball eyes.

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The Hours Review


Very Good

"The Hours" is an Oscar voter's nightmare. An adaptation of Michael Cunningham's novel about three women in three different time periods whose lives are profoundly affected by Virginia Woolf's "Mrs. Dalloway," the film features equally magnificent performances of nearly equal screen time from three of the best actresses working in film today.

Meryl Streep submerges herself in the self-sacrificing soul of Clarissa Vaughan, a modern Manhattan book editor whose longtime dear friend -- and volatile ex-lover -- Richard (Ed Harris) likes to ruffle her feathers by comparing her to the heroine of Woolf's book. Both women are externally serene, perfectionist party-throwers hiding deep reservoirs of regret over missed opportunities while living lives as mother-hen caretakers to others.

Julianne Moore plays Laura Brown, a fragile, pregnant 1950s housewife in the midst of reading "Mrs. Dalloway," whose deep depression (like Woolf's) and suicidal musings (like Dalloway's) go all but unnoticed by everyone except her young son (Jack Rovello), who clings to her apron strings with worry.

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Allison Janney Movies

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