Allen Leech

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Opening night of Hamlet

Allen Leech - Opening night of Hamlet at the Barbican - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 25th August 2015

Allen Leech
Allen Leech

'Downton Abbey' wrap party at The Ivy

Allen Leech - 'Downton Abbey' wrap party at The Ivy - Arrivals at The Ivy - London, United Kingdom - Saturday 15th August 2015

BAFTA tribute to Downton Abbey

Allen Leech - BAFTA tribute to Downton Abbey at the Richmond Theatre - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 11th August 2015

Allen Leech
Allen Leech
Allen Leech
Allen Leech

BAFTA Tribute Downton Abbey

Allen Leech , Fifi Hart - BAFTA Tribute: Downton Abbey held at the Richmond Theatre - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 11th August 2015

Allen Leech and Fifi Hart
Allen Leech and Fifi Hart
Allen Leech and Fifi Ward

The Dowton Abbey Ball

Rob James-Collier and Allen Leech - The Downton Abbey Ball, in aid of Centrepoint, held at the Savoy - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 30th April 2015

Rob James-Collier and Allen Leech
Rob James-Collier
Rob James-Collier
Rob James-Collier

Michelle Dockery, Actress Best Known As Downton Abbey's Lady Mary, Engaged?


Michelle Dockery Allen Leech

Is Lady Mary engaged? Downton Abbey's own Michelle Dockery is reportedly engaged to John Dineen. The couple have been dating for over a year and reports in a British tabloid claim the pair has decided to take the next step - down the aisle! The couple are yet to officially confirm the news but sources claim 33-year-old Dockery showed off her ring to her fellow Downton Abbey actors at a script reading, according to reports in the Mail.

Michelle Dockery
Michelle Dockery is reportedly engaged.

Read More: A Spot Of Festive Grouse Shooting? It Must Be The 'Downton Abbey' Christmas Special!

Continue reading: Michelle Dockery, Actress Best Known As Downton Abbey's Lady Mary, Engaged?

Video - Timothy Spall And Jack O'Connell Arrive At National Board Of Review Gala - Part 1


'Mr. Turner' star Timothy Spall and 'Unbroken' star Jack O'Connell arrived among the many filmmakers and actors at the 2015 National Board of Review Gala, held at Cipriani 42nd Street in New York.

Continue: Video - Timothy Spall And Jack O'Connell Arrive At National Board Of Review Gala - Part 1

Biopics Win Big At 2015 Palm Springs Film Festival Awards [Photos]


Benedict Cumberbatch Allen Leech Matthew Beard Reese Witherspoon Laura Dern Eddie Redmayne Stephen Hawking J.K Simmons Steve Carell Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu Brad Pitt Robert Downey Jr Patrick Stewart

The 2015 Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards saw accolades going to some very well-deserved movies from the last year - with some even more well-deserved individuals picking them up.

Eddie Redmayne, Benedict Cumberbatch and J.K. Simmons
[L-R] Eddie Redmayne, Benedict Cumberbatch and J.K. Simmons at Palm Springs Film Festival Awards (Credit: Michael Buckner at Getty Images Entertainment

 Unsurprisingly, the Ensemble Cast Award went to the actors from 'The Imitation Game'; a movie depicting the era-defining career of codebreaker Alan Turing during World War II and his subsequent arrest for being homosexual. It stars Benedict Cumberbatch in the lead role, with the likes of Allen Leech, Matthew Beard and Alex Lawther - the latter of whom plays Turing's younger self. Directed by the BAFTA nominated Morten Tyldum, the movie has already been nominated for five Golden Globes, and it definitely looks to be in line for an Academy Award.

Continue reading: Biopics Win Big At 2015 Palm Springs Film Festival Awards [Photos]

Video - Sir Charles Dance And Matthew Goode Pose Arriving At 'The Imitation Game' Première - Part 2


The New York premier for 'The Imitation Game' saw celebrities fall upon the Ziegfeld Theatre in droves, amongst them were 'Game of Thrones'' Charles Dance, as well as Matthew Goode and wife Sophie Dymoke.

Continue: Video - Sir Charles Dance And Matthew Goode Pose Arriving At 'The Imitation Game' Première - Part 2

Video - 'The Imitation Game' Premiere Sees Benedict Cumberbatch, Kiera Knightly And Charles Dance Pose For Photos - Part 3


The New York premiere for 'The Imitation Game' took place at the Ziegfeld Theatre, with stars of the film and various celebrities including the film's star, Benedict Cumberbatch. Cumberbtach was joined by the rest of the cast, including Kiera Knightly, Matthew Goode, Mark Strong and acting legend Charles Dance.

Continue: Video - 'The Imitation Game' Premiere Sees Benedict Cumberbatch, Kiera Knightly And Charles Dance Pose For Photos - Part 3

The Imitation Game Review


Excellent

A biopic that plays out like a cerebral thriller, this film traces the life of Alan Turing, the British maths genius who essentially invented the computer and won World War II before being driven to suicide by a cruel legal system. So it's striking that Norwegian filmmaker Morten Tyldum (Headhunters) infuses the film with humour, energy and intelligence. And with an astounding performance from Benedict Cumberbatch, he also manages to find layers of nuance in first-time screenwriter Graham Moore's on-the-nose script.

We meet Cumberbatch's Alan as a 27-year-old Cambridge professor in 1939, recruited by MI6 officer Menzies (Mark Strong) and military commander Denniston (Charles Dance) to join the team at Bletchley Park as they try to crack Germany's Enigma code. An eccentric genius, Alan struggles to fit in with his colleagues (Matthew Goode, Allen Leech and Matthew Beard), but he manages to connect with Jean (Keira Knightley), whom he recruits even though she's not allowed to work alongside the men. Then Alan begins to build his ambitious, unprecedented computing machine. No one understands how it can help decode Enigma, but they can see that he's on to something. Meanwhile, Alan has his own secret: he's gay, which is a criminal offence at the time.

The story is told with three interwoven timelines, with the central plot being the race to break Enigma and turn the tide of the war against the Nazis. Alongside this are scenes set in 1951, when a policeman (Rory Kinnear) interviews Turing about his homosexuality. And there are also flashbacks to 1928, when the young Turing (a superb Alex Lawther) has his first encounter with cryptology, romance and pretending to be someone he's not. The links between these three strands feel somewhat pushy, all hinging on the line: "It's people no one imagines anything of who do things no one can imagine." But Tyldum allows plenty of space for the actors to add uneven edges that draw out the meaning in more subtle, involving ways.

Continue reading: The Imitation Game Review

The Imitation Game - Interview Clip


It's World War II and things are looking bleak as the allies struggle to decipher the Germans' ingenious Enigma Code; a puzzle that could bring an immediate end to the war with all their movements quickly surfacing. Unfortunately, their enigma seems to be nearly impossible, at least until the British government enlist the help of gifted university graduate Alan Turing, whose remarkable ability for solving problems has eluded no-one. With the help of a tireless team, Turing sets about developing a top secret machine with the ability to find and eliminate all possible sequences with the speed and efficiency that would be impossible just using a human brain. When it seems he indeed has managed to make a breakthrough, discoveries about his personal life put him in danger of the very people he was trying to help.

Continue: The Imitation Game - Interview Clip

Grand Piano Review


Good

Spanish director Eugenio Mira combines slick filmmaking with a dark and nasty plot as this fast-paced thriller unfolds almost in real time. So even if the premise doesn't quite stand up to scrutiny, it's packed with characters and twists that keep the audience glued to the screen as the mystery charges inexorably forward. Suspense comes in some gruesome surprises along the way, as well as in the actors' urgent performances.

The film opens as Tom (Elijah Wood) heads to Chicago for his first piano performance in five years, organised by his movie-star wife Emma (Kerry Bishe). She's even flown in the custom piano owned by Tom's late mentor, whose fortune mysteriously vanished after he died (cue an ominous chord!). Despite enormous pressure from the press and his fans, Tom is quietly confident about his long-awaited return to the stage. An old friend (Don McManus) is conducting tonight, and his assistant (Alex Winter) has everything under control. Then just as he begins to play Tom sees words in red ink on his score: "Play one note wrong and you die!" Using an earpiece and a laser gunsight, an angry fan (John Cusack) leads Tom on a wild cat-and-mouse game right through the performance.

Yes, the idea is pretty preposterous, and not just because Tom can play outrageously complicated pieces note-perfect while a maniac shouts in his ear. Tom even manages to make phone calls and send text messages while playing, darting off-stage to crank up suspense along the way. The main threat is against his wife, whose demanding friend (Tamsin Egerton) and her browbeaten husband (Allen Leech) also get involved in the mayhem, which no one else in the theatre seems to notice until the over-the-top finale. But through all of this, Mira directs with a Hitchcockian grip on the suspense, deploying gallows humour, sweeping camerawork, dramatic music and complex long takes tighten the screws.

Continue reading: Grand Piano Review

The Imitation Game - Teaser Trailer


Alan Turing is a mathematician whose genius leads him to be enlisted in a major code-breaking scheme during World War II, where he is set the task of deciphering German secrets. Working strictly covertly at the Government Code and Cypher School at Bletchley Park, he and his team study tirelessly in order to crack a complex Enigma that would allow them to win the war. To everyone's surprise, he begins building a machine which he insists will have the capability to interpret any Nazi Enigmas with it's ability to eliminate possible sequences with efficiency and speed. However, frequently scorned for his unconventional methods and later for his sexuality, he becomes the unsung hero of the War, saving millions of lives and bringing justice upon the world.

Continue: The Imitation Game - Teaser Trailer

In Fear Review


OK

Claustrophobic and creepy, this experiment in contained horror has its moments as just three characters circle around each other. But the approach is almost infuriatingly vague, which eliminates any real suspense. Still, it's sharply well shot and played, with a moody atmosphere that builds a strong sense of uncertainty. And director Lovering is extremely adept at making us jump at something unexpected.

It all kicks off when Tom (De Caestecker) invites Lucy (Englert) to attend a Northern Irish music festival with him. They've only been dating for a couple of weeks, and he's hoping this weekend clinches the deal, so he books a night in a romantic, isolated hotel. But on the way they are thoroughly unnerved by locals in a pub as they get lost on country lanes that, of course, are outside mobile phone and GPS coverage. There's also the problem that the hotel's signs are sending them in circles, and as night falls they wonder if they'll ever get there. All of which badly strains their new relationship. Then they run into a young guy (Leech) in the middle of the road.

With only three actors in the cast, it helps that they're all experts at bringing out subtle layers of intensity in each scene. The film is a riot of stolen glances and verbal jabs. These are people who don't always react in the most helpful ways, and they even seem to surprise themselves with the self-centred things they do. But for Lovering this interaction doesn't seem to be enough, and he shifts the focus to the fact that there's something evil and menacing in the darkness and rain, abandoning the more interesting character tension for random violence.

Continue reading: In Fear Review

Allen Leech

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