Alexander Siddig

Alexander Siddig

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Valar Morghulis - But Who Do We Think Will Die In This Season Of 'Game Of Thrones'? [Speculative Spoilers]


Kit Harington Alexander Siddig Alfie Allen Gwendoline Christie Nikolaj Coster-Waldau Peter Dinklage Emilia Clarke Lena Headey Sophie Turner Maisie Williams Jerome Flynn George R. R. Martin Rory McCann

Prince Doran - We've only seen Prince Doran Martell (Alexander Siddig) in one episode so far, he's already made a strong impression on everyone. The elder brother of fan favourite Oberyn, who came to a horribly messy end in the last season, Prince Doran is trying his best to keep the peace in Dorne, and stop his people from seeking revenge against the Lannisters. It stands to reason, however, that his death would make give them a great reason to rise up and start a war.

Kit Harrigton in 'Game of Thrones'Kit Harington in 'Game of Thrones'

Brienne/Podrick - Brienne (Gwendoline Christie) and Podrick (Daniel Portman) have been giving us a good dose of the "two buddies traveling", following in the footsteps of Tyrion (Peter Dinklage ) and Bronn (Jerome Flynn), and Arya (Maisie Williams) and the Hound (Rory McCann). The problem is, that each of those has come to a rather disastrous ending at some point, and the death of Brienne or Podrick seems likely - especially with what they seem to be getting themselves into.

Continue reading: Valar Morghulis - But Who Do We Think Will Die In This Season Of 'Game Of Thrones'? [Speculative Spoilers]

Meet The Stars of Game of Thrones Season 5


Jonathan Pryce Alexander Siddig

Whilst the series won't return to television screens until next year, casting for the new characters to be introduced in season 5 of the fantasy series has been rumoured for months. However at San Diego Comic-Con, HBO finally announced which nine actors would be joining the ensemble cast for 2015. 

Game of Thrones S4
Who will be joining Cersei Lannister in Westeros next season?

Sudanese-English actor Alexander Siddig was announced as Doran Martell, ruling lord of Dorne and elder brother to Prince Oberyn Martell, who fans will know came to a grisly end last season. Siddig is best known for his role as Doctor Julian Bashir in 'Star Trek: Deep Space Nine' but has also starred in Syriana alongside George Clooney and action film Kingdom of Heaven.

Continue reading: Meet The Stars of Game of Thrones Season 5

FedCon 23 - Autograph Session

Alexander Siddig - Actors from popular Sci-Fi films attend an autograph session at FedCon 23 - Dusseldorf, Germany - Saturday 31st May 2014

Miral Review


OK
Inventive camerawork and raw performances bring this powerful true story to vivid life. So it's a shame director Schnabel loses his grip in the final act.

It's still an important film, but it lacks the badly needed final gut-punch.

Although born in the 1970s, Miral (Pinto) traces her life back to Israel's partition in 1948, when the young Hind (Abbass) turned her father's home into an orphanage for Palestinian refugees. Three decades later, Miral becomes a student in Hind's school when her father (Siddig) places her there after the death of her mother (Al Massri). Later as a teen, Miral's relationship with her father and Hind are strained when she develops a crush on handsome freedom fighter Hani (Metwally). And she begins to realise that the path to peace is rather complex.

Continue reading: Miral Review

4.3.2.1 Review


Grim
There's an interesting idea in this film, as we watch four people over the same three days while their experiences converge into one story. But the plot is riddled with holes and filmmaker Clarke strains to hold it together.

Four pals go their separate ways for a fateful weekend. Shannon (Lovibond) is struggling with dark emotions as her parents split up, but her friends seem too busy to listen. Cass (Egerton) is flying to New York for an important audition and also to lose her virginity to an internet friend, but neither go as planned. Kerrys (Warren-Markland) is the loudest member of her boisterous family, clashing with her brother (Chillin) while her girlfriend (Fielding) cheers her on. And Jo (Roberts) is stuck working in the family shop through two eventful nights.

Continue reading: 4.3.2.1 Review

The Nativity Story Review


OK
There's a newly famous scene in Borat where a rodeo official advises the titular character to shave his moustache so as not to arouse suspicion that he's a terrorist. What could that possibly have to do with a movie about the birth of Jesus? Well, given that said rodeo official would have to advise (probably rather awkwardly) virtually everyone in this film to do the same, a whole lot.

Many Biblical epics have graced the screen but few have made any effort to match the casting with the geography. The Nativity Story is a notable exception. In a narrative long since detached from the holiday that celebrates it, Israelite Mary (Keisha Castle-Hughes), living under Roman rule in, well, zero B.C., sees a vision in which the angel Gabriel (Alexander Siddig) tells her that she will conceive a child by the Holy Spirit. Cue the scratching of the record.

Continue reading: The Nativity Story Review

The Nativity Story Review


OK
There's a newly famous scene in Borat where a rodeo official advises the titular character to shave his moustache so as not to arouse suspicion that he's a terrorist. What could that possibly have to do with a movie about the birth of Jesus? Well, given that said rodeo official would have to advise (probably rather awkwardly) virtually everyone in this film to do the same, a whole lot.

Many Biblical epics have graced the screen but few have made any effort to match the casting with the geography. The Nativity Story is a notable exception. In a narrative long since detached from the holiday that celebrates it, Israelite Mary (Keisha Castle-Hughes), living under Roman rule in, well, zero B.C., sees a vision in which the angel Gabriel (Alexander Siddig) tells her that she will conceive a child by the Holy Spirit. Cue the scratching of the record.

Continue reading: The Nativity Story Review

Syriana Review


OK
Never send a writer to do a director's job. That, more than the addictive evils of easy oil and cozy government/business corruption, is the true lesson of Syriana. When Steven Soderbergh took on Stephen Gaghan's byzantine script for Traffic, he utilized a few simple tricks to keep it all making sense, everything from grouping stories by color scheme to casting vivid character actors for minor roles so that they wouldn't get lost in the shuffle. Gaghan doesn't have these skills to bring to bear and though he beats his sprawling epic somewhat into shape, it leaves one wishing for the film that could have been, given a better director.

Like Traffic, Syriana is a messy Gordian knot of plot, only with no Soderbergh to slice it neatly open. Instead of drug trafficking, the subject this time is the nexus where oil corporations, the U.S. government, Islamic extremism, and Middle East dictatorships come together in an unholy fusion of polity and greed. The characters are introduced at a leisurely pace, Gaghan laying it all out with perhaps a little too much care. Once things start to cohere, the film shunts into a political thriller about an unnamed Gulf State where the ailing king's two sons are jockeying for control; one is a lazy playboy beloved by U.S. interests and the other is an educated reformer who wants to modernize his country and stop kowtowing to the west.

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Reign of Fire Review


Weak
Pity the dragon. When not building lame adventures around the mythical beasts (Dungeons & Dragons), filmmakers have saddled the poor creatures with the smooth baritone stylings of Sean Connery (Dragonheart). Reign of Fire, director Rob Bowman's grim vision of a ravaged future, doesn't completely reverse the negative trend, but it does borrow enough recognizable elements of contradictory genres to fashion a passable monster mash.

In the not-too-distant future, London drillers uncover a dragon's lair far below the surface, awakening a horde of slumbering beasts and triggering a mass invasion. The creatures pillage our planet, destroying every major city from Paris to New York. We're not shown the attacks, but rather a montage of headlines from newspapers.

Continue reading: Reign of Fire Review

Vertical Limit Review


OK
After suffering through an airline showing of The Perfect Storm, I could think of no better way to spend the evening than with another Man vs. Nature story in 2000's take on the genre, Vertical Limit.

As the thrill-packed trailer might already have cued you, this is an action-filled mountaineering movie, with Chris O'Donnell as Peter Garrett, the unlikely hero trying to save his stranded sister Annie (Robin Tunney) from certain death atop K2, the second-highest place on earth. How'd she get there? Glad you asked... three years after a family tragedy sends Annie on a perpetual climbing quest and Peter grounded on earth, the siblings meet up again at the base of K2, where a Texas billionaire (Bill Paxton) is ascending the peak as a publicity stunt with Annie in tow. Naturally, we learn you can't mess with Mother Nature for profit, and the climbing team ends up stuck in a crevasse only a few hundred feet from the summit -- beaten up, but alive. Barely.

Continue reading: Vertical Limit Review

Kingdom of Heaven Review


Grim

For almost five years now, Hollywood studios have beentrying to duplicate the success of "Gladiator"by making the same big-budget historical battle epic over ("TheLast Samurai") and over ("Troy")and over ("KingArthur") and over ("Alexander").

Each movie has re-imagined history from a modern, let's-keep-an-open-mindperspective and hewed to a shopworn formula in which the hero rallies hismen against great odds and for a greater good. He invariably leads theminto the same blood-and-mud war scenes, which are always shot in the samestaccato slow-motion that characterizes the chaos of combat but forgetsthe audience needs to be kept abreast of who is winning. The hero alsoalways finds time to romance a beautiful woman from another culture.

Aside from having different casts, the only significantvariations between these films seem to be 1) whether the hero was of noblebirth or came up from nothing to become a great leader, and 2) whetherthe battlefields are green and forested or brown and sandy. One thing mostof them definitely have in common is that they've bombed at the box office.

Continue reading: Kingdom of Heaven Review

Reign Of Fire Review


Weak

There's a lot of lowbrow, bad B-movie entertainment value to be had in "Reign of Fire," a post-Apocalyptic dragon slayer flick in which the two leads chomp considerably more scenery with their acting than fire-breathing monsters barbecue with their breath.

This overacting is clearly by design since the film stars Christian Bale and Matthew McConaughey, two talented actors more than capable of subtly and nuance. But subtly and nuance have no place in a movie about the remnants of humanity battling dragons for dominance over Earth, and director Rob Bowman knows it.

Buffed and sweaty Bale ("Captain Corelli's Mandolin," "American Psycho") emotes in the extreme as the gruff but benevolent leader of a rag-tag community that survives in an ancient castle outside London (a nod to dragon tales of yore), which they've turned into a fortress. The year is 2020, and 18 years before Bale was the little boy who unwittingly discovered and awoke the alpha dragon in an underground cavity while visiting his construction forewoman mom on a subway tunnel job.

Continue reading: Reign Of Fire Review

Alexander Siddig

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