Alex Gibney

Alex Gibney

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John Travolta Doesn't Care to See Alex Gibney's Scientology Documentary


John Travolta Alex Gibney

John Travolta has come out in defence of his controversial religion Scientology after the release of Alex Gibney's documentary Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, which depicts the church as dangerous.

John TravoltaJohn Travolta has defended his controversial church

Travolta, who converted to Scientology in 1975, told the Tampa Bay Times that he hasn't watched the film and that he doesn't "really care" to see it. 

Continue reading: John Travolta Doesn't Care to See Alex Gibney's Scientology Documentary

Frank Sinatra HBO Documentary 'All Or Nothing' Celebrates Iconic Singer's 100th Birthday


Frank Sinatra Mia Farrow Nancy Sinatra Alex Gibney

As one of the most recognisable voices of the 20th century, much has been written about the colourful life of Frank Sinatra in the years since his death in 1998. But this Sunday night (April 5th ) on HBO, Alex Gibney’s latest documentary All Or Nothing will attempt to provide the most in-depth look yet at both the singer’s career and personal life.

Continue reading: Frank Sinatra HBO Documentary 'All Or Nothing' Celebrates Iconic Singer's 100th Birthday

Premiere of HBO's 'Sinatra: All or Nothing at All'

Frank Marshall, Tina Sinatra and Alex Gibney - Premiere of HBO's 'Sinatra: All or Nothing at All' at the Time Warner Center - Arrivals at Time Warner Center - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 31st March 2015

Frank Marshall, Tina Sinatra and Alex Gibney
Frank Marshall, Tina Sinatra and Alex Gibney
Alex Gibney and Frank Marshall
Frank Marshall
Frank Marshall

Featuring Allegations About Tom Cruise, Scientology Documentary 'Going Clear' Captivates Sundance Film Festival


Tom Cruise John Travolta Nicole Kidman Alex Gibney

Directed by Alex Gibney, Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, has become the most talked about film to premiere at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Claiming to lift the lid on the famously secretive religion, the doc also includes allegations about famous follower Tom Cruise and the church’s founder L. Ron Hubbard.

Tom CruiseTom Cruise is one of Scientology's most famous followers

Based in part on the book of the same name by Lawrence Wright, the film features interviews with former church members and never before seen footage, including some of Tom Cruise stage at a Scientology gala.

Continue reading: Featuring Allegations About Tom Cruise, Scientology Documentary 'Going Clear' Captivates Sundance Film Festival

Sundance: Gibney's Scientology Doc 'Going Clear' Has Tom Cruise Claims


Alex Gibney

Alex Gibney's Scientology documentary Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief rocked audiences on the third day of the Sundance Film Festival, with various revelations coming to light from former followers of the religion. The movie had apparently been vetted by 160 lawyers before its premiere.

Alex GibneyAlex Gibney's documentary was apparently vetted by 160 laywers before its release

The film details numerous allegations, including revelations about Tom Cruise and his then-wife Nicole Kidman. Based on a nonfiction bestseller by Lawrence Wright,  Gibney's film reveals that Kidman was viewed by Scientology head honchos as a "Potential Trouble Source" and an enemy to any Scientologist. That status mainly arose from the fact that she was raised by a father who was a psychologist - a profession the church despises.

Continue reading: Sundance: Gibney's Scientology Doc 'Going Clear' Has Tom Cruise Claims

Premiere of HBO documentary film, 'Mr. Dynamite: The Rise of James Brown'

Christian McBride and Alex Gibney - A variety of stars were snapped on the red carpet at the Premiere of HBO's documentary film 'Mr. Dynamite: The Rise of James Brown' The event was held at the Park Cafe in New York City, United States - Monday 20th October 2014

Victoria Pearman and Alex Gibney
Alex Gibney
Alex Gibney

Finding Fela Review


OK

While the eventful life of Fela Kuti provides more than enough subject matter for a biographical documentary, award-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney weakens the film with a second narrative strand that feels like another movie altogether. He did the same thing with last year's The Armstrong Lie, which compromised the Lance Armstrong scandal with clips from an abandoned glowing doc about his earlier comeback. This time, he has intercut Fela's story with a theatre group trying to mount a show about his life.

Born in 1938, Fela is considered one of the most important figures in 20th century Africa. As a pioneering composer and performer, he transformed Nigeria's musical landscape, all while standing up for human rights and criticising political corruption, often at considerable risk of retaliation from Nigeria's oppressive government. As a young man, he was influenced by jazz clubs he visited in London and Los Angeles, and returned to Lagos to start his own iconic venue, The Shrine. A lone voice against government corruption, he lived a communal life with countless wives, girlfriends and children, and he very nearly sabotaged his career with heavy drug use. But even with his death in 1997 at age 58, he challenged the Nigerian state propaganda machine, which had declared that Aids did not exist in the country.

This story is told with a superb wealth of archival footage, stills and interviews, letting Fela himself speak and sing as his life traverses the first 50 years of Nigerian independence. This is such a vitally important story of a seriously revolutionary man that it's utterly gripping. So it's rather frustrating that Gibney weaves it together with the project to tell Fela's story through a Broadway musical. The practice and performance clips offer dramatic recreations of events in Fela's life, putting his music in context, but the actual home movies and newsreel clips tell us a lot more.

Continue reading: Finding Fela Review

MOMA IFC Present Boyhood Premiere

Alex Gibney - 'Boyhood' New York premiere at Museum of Modern Art - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 8th July 2014

Alex Gibney

2014 Writers Guild Awards LA ceremony - Press Room

Alex Gibney - WGA winners pose at 2014 Writers Guild Awards Press room at JW Marriott Los Angeles L.A. LIVE. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 1st February 2014

Alex Gibney
Alex Gibney

66th Annual Writer's Guild Awards Los Angeles Ceremony

Alex Gibney - 66th Annual Writer's Guild Awards Los Angeles Ceremony at JW Marriott - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 1st February 2014

Alex Gibney
Alex Gibney

The Armstrong Lie Review


Good

This biographical documentary about disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong feels eerily gentle compared to filmmaker Alex Gibney's recent films, the WikiLeaks doc We Steal Secrets and the Catholic priest expose Mea Maxima Culpa. But then it was originally conceived as a celebration of Armstrong's comeback at the 2009 Tour de France, which is still at the heart of the film.

It was during this comeback that Armstrong's stellar image started to slip, with old rivalries and gurgling rumours surging to the surface. Gibney intercuts interviews he shot at the time with more recent chats, including a conversation immediately after Armstrong taped his notorious confessional interview with Oprah Winfrey. So we vividly see Armstrong's two-faced personality. Along the way, Gibney also traces the cyclist's remarkable rise to fame, his near death from cancer and the secret doping system he used to win the Tour de France seven times from 1999 to 2005. Armstrong's rationale is that everyone else was doing the same thing, so it was actually a level playing field.

Only of course it wasn't, because many cyclists remained clean and were edged out of the winning position as a result. Gibney also talks to a wide variety of experts, journalists and fellow riders who discuss the sport's culture of omerta (a mafia-style code of honour). From the news reports, we already know about the many years of deception, which is why society no longer holds professional athletes to such high, clean standards. It's clearly more about the money now than the human achievement. And there's so much cash to be made that competitors will break every rule there is if they think they'll get away with it.

Continue reading: The Armstrong Lie Review

Ben Foster To Play Lance Armstrong in Biopic, Chris O'Dowd, His Nemesis, David Walsh


Ben Foster Chris O'Dowd Alex Gibney Lance Armstrong

Ben Foster will play the part of Lance Armstrong in Stephen Frear’s biopic, and he will be joined by Chris O’Dowd, who’ll play journalist David Walsh, who campaigned tirelessly to expose the biggest cheating scandal in the world of sport, Deadline report.

Ben FosterChris Dowd
Ben Foster and Chris O'Dowd will both star in the untitled biopic

Foster, while bearing a resemblance to the disgraced cyclist, has seen his reputation grow of late with performances in Kill Your Darlings – alongside Daniel Radcliffe - and Lone Survivor, which also stars Mark Wahlberg. The Irish actor O’Dowd has become a household name stateside due to his performances in Bridesmaids and the popular sitcom, Girls.

Continue reading: Ben Foster To Play Lance Armstrong in Biopic, Chris O'Dowd, His Nemesis, David Walsh

'The Armstrong Lie': An Incredible Story of Denial and Power, Told by Alex Gibney [Trailer]


Alex Gibney Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong’s story is an implausible, unbelievable, incredible, but none of those adjectives would be applicable if the following wasn’t: it’s true. In The Armstrong Lie, Gibney admits to rooting for the shamed cyclist, before discovering – along with the rest of the world – that he’d been cheating.

Lance ArmstrongLance Armstrong tells his side in The Armstrong Lie

Famed for his insightful, thought-provoking documentaries that explore some of the biggest happenings in culture, sport, politics and crime – even though those spectrums often collide – the route that lead Gibney to his Armstrong piece wasn’t typical.

Continue reading: 'The Armstrong Lie': An Incredible Story of Denial and Power, Told by Alex Gibney [Trailer]

Pacific Rim Now Out In Cinemas, But What Other Films Have Been Released Today?


Guillermo Del Toro Tuppence Middleton Alexandra Roach Benedict Cumberbatch Iain Softley Billy Crystal John Goodman Julian Assange Alex Gibney Ron Perlman

Friday 12th July has been quite the launchpad for a host of new and exciting films, showcasing the genre spectrum. From action blockbusters to indies, political thrillers to kids animation films, there'll be something to suit all tastes and ages as the summer of film gets hotter.

Well, we'll start off with Trap For Cinderella first because it's the underdog erotic thriller indie with an interesting premise. The Iain Softley film will star young, up-and-coming British actresses Tuppence Middleton and Alexandra Roach as vivacious Micky and shy Do: two girls who are reunited after years apart and reignite a secret passion despite the disapproval they are faced with.

Trap for Cinderella
Tuppence Middleton & Alexandra Roach In Trap For Cinderella.

Continue reading: Pacific Rim Now Out In Cinemas, But What Other Films Have Been Released Today?

We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks Review


Good

With a subject matter that oddly feels both timely and out-of-date, this documentary is packed with telling details about WikiLeaks, Although it gets muddy as it delves into the lives of founder Julian Assange and whistleblower Bradley Manning. Prolific Oscar-winning documentarian Alex Gibney (see Taxi to the Dark Side or Maxima Mea Culpa) deploys his usual skill to assemble a lucid, entertaining film, but the dirt-digging approach leaves us with more questions than answers.

The roots of WikiLeaks go back to the pre-internet days in 1989, when Melbourne student Assange participated with a group of hackers to break into Nasa's space shuttle launch system with a message from Australian band Midnight Oil: "You talk of times of peace for all, and then prepare for war". Nearly 20 years later he established WikiLeaks in the response the growing mountain of secrets being held by Western governments following 9/11. The idea is simple: WikiLeaks allows people to post images and documents anonymously in a way that can never be taken down. And it's essentially run by one man with a battered laptop and lots of friends.

The film features a wide array of interviews with people who have worked with Assange or know his work, plus extensive footage of the man himself. The most telling description of him is as a "humanitarian anarchist" who speaks out against what he sees as "not democracy but encroaching privatised censorship". And the main focus here is on his interaction with Manning, a military computer nerd who was picked on for being gay, stuck in an isolated Iraqi base and shocked by evidence he discovered about the American military's illegal, unethical and immoral activities.

Continue reading: We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks Review

Alex Gibney

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