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The Neon Demon Trailer


The Neon Demon follows the journey of its protagonist Jesse (Elle Fanning) when she makes the move to Los Angeles as an aspiring model. Jesse is a young female that has been recruited by a fashion designer, as the typical girl from a small town with big dreams who wants to make it big in the modelling industry. However Jesse is not your typical model as she is described as a dangerous girl in the sense that the narrative soon takes a sinister turn. 

Continue: The Neon Demon Trailer

Emily Mortimer, Ewan McGregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola - Edinburgh International Film Festival - 'Doll & Em' - Photocall at Lyceum Theatre - Edinburgh, United Kingdom - Sunday 21st June 2015

Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola
Emily Mortimer, Ewan Mcgregor, Dolly Wells and Alessandro Nivola

Emily Mortimer and Alessandro Nivola - The Cartier Queen's Cup 2015 Polo Finals at Windsor Great Park - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 14th June 2015

Emily Mortimer and Alessandro Nivola

Virginia Nivola and Alessandro Nivola - 2015 Tony Awards - Red Carpet Arrivals at Tony Awards - New York City, New York, United States - Sunday 7th June 2015

Virginia Nivola and Alessandro Nivola

Alessandro Nivola, Patricia Clarkson and Bradley Cooper - A host of stars were photographed as they arrived for the Meet the 2015 Tony Nominees reception which was held at the Paramount Hotel in New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 29th April 2015

Alessandro Nivola, Patricia Clarkson and Bradley Cooper
Alessandro Nivola, Patricia Clarkson and Bradley Cooper
Alessandro Nivola
Alessandro Nivola

Alessandro Nivola - Cast members from 'The Elephant Man' receive their portraits at Sardi's famous theatre district eatery. at Sardi's, - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 2nd April 2015

Alessandro Nivola
Max Klimavicius and Alessandro Nivola
Max Klimavicius and Alessandro Nivola
Max Klimavicius and Alessandro Nivola
Alessandro Nivola
Alessandro Nivola

Alessandro Nivola and Patricia Clarkson - Shots of a host of stars as they arrived to the Opening night of The Heidi Chronicles which was held at the Music Box Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 19th March 2015

Alessandro Nivola and Patricia Clarkson
Alessandro Nivola and Patricia Clarkson

Alessandro Nivola - A variety of stars were photographed as they arrived for The New Group 20th Anniversary Gala which was held at the Tribeca Rooftop in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 9th March 2015

Alessandro Nivola

Alessandro Nivola - A variety of stars were photographed as they arrived at the 2015 Roundabout Theatre Company Spring Gala which was held at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 2nd March 2015

Alessandro Nivola
Alessandro Nivola
Alessandro Nivola
Alessandro Nivola

Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer - The 87th Annual Oscars - Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall - Arrivals at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Oscars - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 22nd February 2015

Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer
Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer

Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the Vanity Fair Oscar Party which was held at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 23rd February 2015

Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer
Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer
Alessandro Nivola and Emily Mortimer

American Hustle - Clips


Irving Rosenfeld is a conman whose impressively deft criminal exploits have eluded authorities for years. However, when he finds himself forced to use his talents for good as he is roped into an FBI sting operation led by the unhinged agent Richie DiMasom, he finds his life of partying, drinking and squandering money under massive threat. He must use his fraudulent cunning to reveal the seriously corrupt crusades of Carmine Polito, the Mayor of Camden, New Jersey, whose power cast spreads much further than his constituency. Irving is helped by the seductive but dangerous Sydney Prosser who soon becomes less of a business partner and more of a mistress. As their relationship deepens, however, they arouse the suspicions of Irving's gregarious but unbalanced wife Rosalyn who threatens their whole operation with her lethal jealousy and deadly rage.

'American Hustle' is a high-stakes gangster thriller directed and co-written by the Oscar nominated David O. Russell ('Silver Linings Playbook', 'I Heart Huckabees', 'Three Kings') alongside writer Eric Singer ('The International'). Featuring a talented award-winning cast (some of whom O'Russell has previously worked with with much success), the flick is set to hit the big screen on December 18th 2013 in the US.

American Hustle Movie Review - Click Here To Read

American Hustle - International Trailer


Whilst running a con, being anonymous is very important. Keeping past operations secret and your personal life out of reach from potential targets is just as important as running the actual hustle. For years Irving Rosenfeld has been a con at the top of his game, evading arrest by the police and capture by past marks but all that could quite easily change when he and his business partner, Sydney Prosser, are recruited by an unruly FBI officer Richie DiMaso. 

The target Rosenfeld has to hit is one even cons wouldn't usually mess with, an elected mayor the FBI believe to be dirty. Mafia connections and lots of Laundered money are the least of Rosenfeld worries, when his wife might just become an accidental chink in their armour. 

Set in the 1970's the films screenplay was written by Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell and is loosely based on a real sting operation named Abscam which lead to the arrest and conviction of a number of elected officials. 

Continue: American Hustle - International Trailer

American Hustle Trailer


Irving Rosenfeld is one of America's most talented con artists but his world of ladies and luxury is hanging in the balance when threatening circumstances force him, along with his temptress business partner and lover Sydney Prosser, to lend his talents to a sting operation set up by the FBI and led by the slightly unbalanced agent Richie DiMaso. Together they set out to uncover the corrupt campaigns behind Carmine Polito, the Mayor of Camden, New Jersey and a powerful political operator. However, Irving's wife Rosalyn Rosenfeld is getting more and more suspicious of her husband's business life and, with his lewd extramarital affairs getting more and more daring, it isn't long before she is driven to extreme lengths to uncover her private issues while in the meantime threatening the stability of the whole operation.

This gangster drama features an all-star cast that will keep you gripped from start to finish. It has been directed by the Oscar nominated David O. Russell ('Silver Linings Playbook', 'I Heart Huckabees', 'Three Kings'), who also co-wrote the screenplay alongside Eric Singer ('The International') in his second feature film. 'American Hustle' will be released in cinemas over in the UK on December 20th 2013.

American Hustle Movie Review - Click Here To Read

Ginger And Rosa Trailer


Ginger and Rosa are teenage girls in the '60s and have vowed to always be the very best of friends. Together they skip school, do each other's hair and talk about everything from politics to the latest teen magazine articles. Both of them lead difficult home lives, with Rosa struggling without a father figure in her life and Ginger's mother tied to the four walls of their home while her activist father fights against the Cold War. Both are wishing to rebel against their dull lives in search of adventure and fulfilling their dreams. However, as the threat of a nuclear apocalypse draws near, the girls are divided by the paths they choose to take; Ginger wants to follow in her father's footsteps and protest against the bomb threat, determined to stay alive, while Rosa just wants to spend time with boys and live the life she has now rather than worry about the furture. Unfortunately, it's Ginger's father Roland that she takes an interest in which only looks to cause more problems. As Ginger seeks the help and guidance from two gay men (both named Mark) and an American poet named Bella, plenty of relationships look set to fall apart and the conflict closest to home becomes the biggest threat in their lives.

'Ginger and Rosa' is a coming-of-age drama about the opportunity ridden world of the sixties directed and written by Sally Potter ('The Man Who Cried', 'The Tango Lesson', 'Orlando').

Starring: Elle Fanning, Christina Hendricks, Alice Englert, Annette Bening, Timothy Spall, Oliver Platt, Alessandro Nivola, Jodhi May, Oliver Milburn, Greg Bennett, Andrew Hawley, Richard Strange, Matt Hookings, Marcus Shakesheff,
Director: Sally Potter

Ginger And Rosa Review


OK

An extraordinary cast lifts this grim British drama into something watchable, even if the script ultimately gives up trying to make any sense. The main problem is that the story is very badly fragmented, but it still captures a vivid sense of how it felt to grow up in 1962 Britain. And the actors give performances that bring the characters to life even in scenes that are somewhat melodramatic.

Ginger and Rosa (Fanning and Englert) are inseparable 16-year-olds who were born in the same hospital on the same day. As they both ponder the horrific possibilities of the Cold War, their reactions begin to diverge, perhaps their first disagreement ever. Ginger's parents (Hendricks and Nivola) are liberal-minded and about to separate yet again, so she takes a militant approach to stopping nuclear annihilation. Rosa lives with her deeply religious single mother (May) and believes that the only thing to do is pray about it. But the thing that drives a real wedge between the girls is Ginger's suspicion that her dad might be having an affair with Rosa.

In the early scenes, Potter establishes the girls as imaginative friends with free spirits who do everything together. Then the plot begins to take increasingly dark twists and turns, leading to a series of awkward or downright horrible confrontations that are freaky and emotional but also thoroughly mawkish. There's a lot of glowering and weeping on display from everyone on-screen. Fortunately Fanning and newcomer Englert maintain a loose honesty in their performances that helps carry us through the difficult moments. And the starry supporting cast is terrific.

Continue reading: Ginger And Rosa Review

Janie Jones Trailer


Ethan Brand is the frontman of a once successful shabby rock band who is slowly on the decline. One night, the band is preparing to go on stage when a former groupie, Mary Ann, shows up unexpectedly. Ethan recognises her straightaway and assumes she has come for sex.

Continue: Janie Jones Trailer

Howl Review


Extraordinary
Oscar-winning documentarians Epstein and Friedman turn their skills to a narrative feature. Sort of. This is essentially a movie based on a poem, but it also tells a remarkable life story and grapples with hugely important issues.

Published in 1956, Allen Ginsberg's poem Howl launched the Beat Generation with its mix of soulful yearning and rage at injustice. When the publisher (Rogers) faces charges that the poem is obscene, Ginsberg (Franco) refuses to attend the trial in San Francisco. And after hearing the lawyers (Strathairn and Hamm) and witnesses (Parker, Daniels, Nivola and Williams), the judge (Balaban) rules in favour of both artistic expression and freedom of the press.

Continue reading: Howl Review

Coco Before Chanel Review


Very Good
This biopic kind of dwells on the misery in Coco Chanel's life, but it's a strong story of a woman who made her own way against all odds. And it's skilfully and beautifully filmed and acted.

After her mother died in 1895, Gabrielle Chanel (Cohen) moves into orphanage, where nuns teach her how to sew. As soon as she's 18 (now Tautou), she becomes a bar singer with her sister (Gillain) and is dubbed "Coco" after her signature song. Even now she's rebelling against the constricting clothes of the day, and when she becomes the mistress of the wealthy Etienne Balsan (Poelvoorde), she has clear ideas about her own life. What she doesn't expect is that she'll fall for his friend Boy Capel (Nivola).

Director-cowriter Fontaine tells this story like Chanel's fashion style: elegant and detailed, but without frills. The film takes us through these early years in a somewhat dispassionate way, only drawing emotion from Tautou's mesmerising performance. She conveys a sharp, opinionated intelligence even as Coco knows her place in society. And as she quietly evolves to the moment she becomes the Coco we remember, Tautou keeps the character consistently engaging without sacrificing any of her inner toughness.

Fontaine doesn't shrink from portraying this male-dominated society: men treated women like possessions. So Coco was a true revolutionary, going against the grain to become the first major female designer. Fontaine makes sure the period detail is sleek and gorgeously recreated, with actors who aren't afraid to show the dark sides of their characters. There are moments of levity, but powerful scenes between Tautou, Poelvoorde and Gillain reveal a shadowy complexity.

The problem is that the film feels a bit gloomy as a result; Coco seems melancholic even when she's smiling. And this carries through to the limited colour scheme, as well as Coco's simple clothing in a time when women wore outrageous frills. But watching closely, we can see Coco in control of her life, even though the men around her thought she was theirs. And into this world, Nivola's Boy is a breath of fresh air, a rare man who can see her for who she is. So where their story goes can't help but move us.

Coco Before Chanel Trailer


Watch the trailer for Coco Before Chanel

Continue: Coco Before Chanel Trailer

Goal II: Living The Dream Review


Weak
As its name implies, Goal II is a sequel, but what you may not know is that it is actually the second part of what will likely be the only European soccer trilogy ever filmed. In this episode, young Mexican-American soccer genius Santiago Munes (Kuno Becker), having made it from LA to one of Britain's top "football" clubs in Goal I, now gets to "live the dream" as a world-famous soccer star.

No sooner is he Britain's brand new sensation than Santi is traded away to the Valhalla of European soccer, Real Madrid. He's happy to go, even if it means putting stress on his relationship with his British fiancée Roz (Anna Friel). Whisked off to Spain, he finds himself sharing a locker room with Beckham, Ronaldinho, Zidane (all appearing as themselves), and Gavin Harris (Alessandro Nivola), an old-time and rapidly aging British soccer star who shows Santi what this world of Ferraris, mansions, and bosomy Spanish sluts is all about. The painfully sincere Santi is wide-eyed but virtuous and only gets into trouble when photographers catch him in what they mistakenly believe to be naughty acts. After seeing the photos herself, poor Roz is bereft in rainy Newcastle.

Continue reading: Goal II: Living The Dream Review

The Eye (2008) Review


Terrible
While it may be cliché to say it, the Asian horror phenomenon is officially dead -- and Jessica Alba killed it. Six years after Hong Kong's Pang brothers unleashed the original creepshow, those horror bottom feeders at Lionsgate have delivered The Eye, a mandated PG-13 retread. While it would be nice to say that the time spent in greenlight limbo aged the frightfest and it's slightly hackneyed organ transplant premise like fine wine, the truth is that all we end up with is overripe cheese.

Sydney Wells (Alba) is a famed concert violinist. At the age of five, a fireworks accident left her blind. She tried surgery at age 12, but it didn't work, so for the last 15 years, she's spent her life sightless. Now, big sister Helen (Parker Posey), who feels responsible for her condition, sets up another procedure. Sydney receives a set of donor corneas, and within weeks, she is seeing again. She's also having hallucinatory visions of burning people, suicidal school children, and a weird shadowy visage with a mouth full of ghost fangs. Seems the previous owner of these eyes died mysteriously and wants Sydney to experience the same visual hell she lived through -- and there is nothing our heroine, or her determined doctor (Alessandro Nivola) can do to stop it.

Continue reading: The Eye (2008) Review

Grace Is Gone Review


Very Good
There are bad choices made by characters in films that infuriate the audience, as nobody can understand why the people on screen would have any reason to do what they are doing. There are also bad choices made by characters which can be instantly understood, as they're the kind of unintelligent behavior which pretty much all those watching can understand doing themselves, given the situation. And since the lamentable choice made by Stanley Phillips (John Cusack) early on in Grace is Gone comes not long after he has discovered that his wife has been killed while serving in Iraq, it would be the rare viewer who wouldn't understand at least some part of why he did it.

Stanley's problem is that the news of Grace's death -- delivered solemnly on a beautiful day by a pair of soldiers who seem carved from headstone granite -- leaves him not only without a wife, but also as the sole provider for a pair of daughters: 12-year-old Heidi and 8-year-old Dawn (played with radiant smarts by, respectively, Shelan O'Keefe and Grace Bednarczyk). So, faced with the horrible news and unsure of when and how to break it to the girls, Stanley hides. A stolid manager at a Home Depot-style store in their quiet Midwestern town, Stanley is the embodiment of dull routine, making it all the more exciting for the girls when he tells them that they're taking off and heading for Enchanted Gardens, a Disneyworld-type theme park where Dawn has always wanted to go. Maybe that will be the right place to tell them, he figures. It's a horrendously bad plan, but given the quiet normalcy of the day and the massive tragedy which Stanley is suddenly tasked with landing on his daughters, it's not shocking at all that he would disappear into a fantasy of sorts, where maybe Grace hasn't died. So off they drive in the SUV with the yellow ribbon magnet on the back, girls curious but thrilled at the sudden adventure, father gripping the wheel tightly while anguish eats him alive from the inside.

Continue reading: Grace Is Gone Review

Face/off Review


Excellent
It's hard to remember the whooshing sighs of disappointment from his fans that greeted John Woo in 1996 when, after so many half-steps and mis-starts, he made his big Hollywood debut with the stolen-nuke thriller Broken Arrow. Having left the Hong Kong business on a high with 1992's psychotic near-parody Hard Boiled, Woo did a Jean-Claude Van Damme flick -- 1993's Hard Target, which was heavily botched by studio interference but still contained some brilliant work -- before deciding to go seriously Hollywood. For Broken Arrow, he toned down his trademark mix of ultra-violent flourishes and teary-eyed humanism to concentrate on doing a by-the-book mid-'90s action flick that was generic in the extreme but raked in the money. The next year, though, Woo proved it had all just been an extraordinarily canny maneuver to allow him to make Face/Off, possibly the greatest, and definitely the most exuberant, action film to come out of the studio system in that decade.

A schizoid doppelganger mind-bender wrapped around your standard ticking-bomb scenario (it's hidden somewhere in Los Angeles and could take out the whole basin if detonated -- or something), Face/Off is an utterly lunatic film in the best possible way. Originally a futuristic thriller, the script was retooled for a modern-day setting, keeping several of its sci-fi elements but focusing more intently on its personality-shifting aspects which seemed to come straight out of Woo's international breakthrough, The Killer. An FBI agent, Sean Archer (John Travolta) has been hunting jet-set super-criminal Castor Troy (Nicolas Cage) for years. For Archer, it's gone beyond personal to haunted obsession, particularly after Troy tried to shoot Archer but missed and killed his son instead. After a gonzo opening sequence involving a Humvee/private jet showdown on a runway and about ten thousand expended rounds (mostly fired by people flying sideways in slo-mo, of course), Archer's team brings down Troy.

Continue reading: Face/off Review

Carolina Review


OK
Just by looking at the cover you'll be able to figure out a fair amount of the content of Carolina. Sure, there will be a love triangle forming its central struggle, and a kindly old grandmother (Shirley MacLaine) will be on hand to dispense wisdom to young Carolina (Julia Stiles).

But will you guess that a major subplot will blatantly (and explicitly) rip off The Rocking Horse Winner? Or that MacLaine will spew a monologue about rubbing manure on her breasts? Wow. How could you?

Continue reading: Carolina Review

Time Code Review


Good
Sorry, Mr. Lynch, your place at the head of the avant-garde experimental filmmaker table has been given away. Messrs. Jarmusch, Toback, Korine, and Cronenberg, you'll all be eating outside. Mike Figgis will be taking over for all of you, and don't come back.

Figgis, who earned a Best Director Oscar nomination for Leaving Las Vegas in 1996, appears to have gone a little funny in the head last year with his inexplicable and nearly dialogue-free The Loss of Sexual Innocence. Now he's fully gone off the deep end with what may be the most ambitious experiment ever: Time Code.

Continue reading: Time Code Review

THE CLEARING Review


Weak

One simple thing a filmmaker can do to make a picture better is to clearly establish time and place. You'd think that such a thing would be a given, but it's surprising how many filmmakers disregard this simple concept.

For the new film "The Clearing," writer Justin Haythe and writer/director Pieter Jan Brugge (a producer on "Bulworth," The Insider" and other films, making his directorial debut) probably intended to play with time, to bend it and stretch it to serve their purposes. But in the end, they only serve to alienate us by deliberately confusing us.

The film begins like a standard-issue kidnapping story, similar to 2000's "Proof of Life" and a dozen others. The filmmakers cut back and forth between the kidnap victim and his fretting wife, trying to build an equal amount of suspense within each storyline.

Continue reading: THE CLEARING Review

Love's Labour's Lost Review


Good

For a long time I've had a theory that the musical genre couldn't survive the cynicism of modern audiences except as a ironic in-joke, like the "South Park" movie or as a post-modern homage, like Woody Allen's "Everyone Says I Love You."

I couldn't have been more wrong -- and leave it to Kenneth Branagh, a writer-director-actor who has made his name revitalizing old (old, old!) school entertainment -- to prove it by bringing back the kind of weightless musical delight that carried Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers to stardom.

For his new adaptation of Shakespeare's "Love's Labour's Lost," Branagh has re-imagined the buoyant romantic comedy as a classy, corny, 1930s movie musical, complete with uplifting dance numbers and a catalog of favorite big band ditties sung with great enthusiasm (if not great skill) by a quality cast of cheerful actors clearly having the time of their lives.

Continue reading: Love's Labour's Lost Review

Mansfield Park Review


OK

The latest Jane Austen novel lovingly adapted to film, "Mansfield Park" features a predictably resolute heroine named Fanny Price, a 10-year-old girl from a poor family who is sent to live with wealthy relations at their country estate.

The first thing her aunt says to her is "Let's have a look at you...Well, I'm sure you have other qualities." When her uncle thinks she's out of earshot, he tells his daughters, "she's not your equal," and he insists she live in the servants' wing to prevent her from tempting her male cousins. Nonetheless, young Edmund takes a shine to her and makes her feel at home, which is the beginning of a life-long friendship.

Well, I think we all know where this is going. As witty and wildly engaging as Austen's coy 18th Century romances are, they're nothing if not predictable.

Continue reading: Mansfield Park Review

Jurassic Park III Review


OK

In 1993, the first "Jurassic Park" took Hollywood's first giant step into the world of computer generated special effects, rendering from scratch huge life-like dinosaurs that genuinely interacted with the humans they chased and chowed on. There were a few tell-tale signs of CGI style that savvy audiences now recognize (soft-focusy skin on some critters, for example). But there wasn't a movie-goer on Earth who wasn't agog at how real those dinos looked.

CGI effects have evolved exponentially in the last eight years and in "Jurassic Park III" the movie's biggest stars are so seamless blended and thoroughly convincing that the very concept of these ancient beasts being a special effect barely even crosses your mind. It only occurred to me once, for about 10 seconds, during a fight between a Tyrannosaurus Rex and this movie's even bigger, meaner baddie called Spinosaurus. Half way through the furious dust-up, it hit me: "Holy cow, these things aren't real!"

I might not even have thought about the effects at all except for being drawn to the extreme deliberateness of the movie's big-budget post-production by the over-amped, over-bearing, Dolby'd-to-death sound effects, apparently designed to shatter eardrums.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park III Review

Alessandro Nivola

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Alessandro Nivola Movies

The Neon Demon Trailer

The Neon Demon Trailer

The Neon Demon follows the journey of its protagonist Jesse (Elle Fanning) when she makes...

Selma Movie Review

Selma Movie Review

One of the finest biopics in recent memory, this drama manages to present someone as...

A Most Violent Year Movie Review

A Most Violent Year Movie Review

With this confident drama, J.C. Chandor (Margin Call, All Is Lost) continues to evolve as...

Selma Trailer

Selma Trailer

“What happens when a man stands up and says ‘enough is enough’?” So goes the...

A Most Violent Year Trailer

A Most Violent Year Trailer

In 1981, New York City saw its most violent year in the city's history. When...

Devil's Knot Movie Review

Devil's Knot Movie Review

Based on the events documented in West of Memphis and the Paradise Lost trilogy, this...

Devil's Knot Trailer

Devil's Knot Trailer

Devil's Knot is a biographical thriller drama based on the events of the West Memphis...

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American Hustle Trailer

American Hustle Trailer

Irving Rosenfeld is a conman whose impressively deft criminal exploits have eluded authorities for years....

American Hustle - International Trailer Trailer

American Hustle - International Trailer Trailer

Whilst running a con, being anonymous is very important. Keeping past operations secret and your...

American Hustle Trailer

American Hustle Trailer

Irving Rosenfeld is one of America's most talented con artists but his world of ladies...

Ginger And Rosa Trailer

Ginger And Rosa Trailer

Ginger and Rosa are teenage girls in the '60s and have vowed to always be...

Ginger and Rosa Movie Review

Ginger and Rosa Movie Review

An extraordinary cast lifts this grim British drama into something watchable, even if the script...

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