Alastair Mackenzie

Alastair Mackenzie

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Perfect Sense Review


Weak
This high-concept apocalyptic thriller starts well, with a lush visual style and strong performances. But Danish screenwriter Aakeson immediately writes himself into a corner: the story and characters have nowhere to go beyond bleak acceptance of the inevitable. So it's difficult to care what happens.

A mysterious illness sweeps the world causing people to experience horrible grief before losing their sense of smell. This creates a challenge for Glasgow chef Michael (McGregor), but that's easy compared to the next epidemic: terror followed by the loss of taste. So with his assistant (Bremner), he experiments with temperature and texture to keep customers happy. Meanwhile, Michael falls for Susan (Green), an epidemiologist trying to figure out what's happening.

People are adjusting to the changes, but the next wave involves rage and hearing loss. How long can human resilience endure?

Continue reading: Perfect Sense Review

You Instead Review


Good
Eclectic filmmaker Mackenzie tries out another genre with this frisky, loose romantic comedy filmed at a music festival. The result is thoroughly enjoyable, with the zing of real crowds and musicians overcoming some very corny plot turns.

Adam (Treadaway) and Tyko (Baynton) are the frontmen for the hit band The Make, getting ready to perform at Scotland's huge T in the Park festival. When they have a confrontation with girl band The Dirty Pinks, a stranger handcuffs Adam to lead singer Morello (Tena) in an attempt to bring peace. Adam's grumpy supermodel girlfriend Lake (Gedmintas) isn't finding this funny, and neither is Morello's nice-guy boyfriend Mark (Mackenzie). But the real problem is that the girls are due on stage soon, and no one can find the key.

Continue reading: You Instead Review

The Last Great Wilderness Review


Grim
With its stark lighting, close quarters, and video photography, The Last Great Wilderness feels a lot like The Celebration, though it isn't an official Dogme film. Too bad that with a dead tired storyline, it doesn't resemble The Celebration in any way that matters. The story concerns two Scottish fellas (and in fact, the first third of the film concerns how they meet at a roadside diner) who run out of gas and hole up at a bizarre boarding house/maybe-cult den in the remote highlands. The movie wants to be everything from splatter film to black comedy and succeeds at none of them, owing to an unintersting script and dead-dull characters.
Alastair Mackenzie

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Ricki And The Flash - Trailer

Ricki And The Flash - Trailer

Ricki and the Flash is a music comedy drama about the high price of a musician's pursuit of fame.