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Bugsy Malone - press night & afterparty

Sir Alan Parker and Lisa Moran - Bugsy Malone - press night & afterparty held at the Lyric Hammersmith, Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 28th April 2015

Raindance Film Festival inaugural party

Alan Parker - Raindance Film Festival inaugural party to celebrate independent film and filmmakers. Event also raises funds for the Independent Film Trust (IFT), which teaches disadvantaged adults and children film making skills. - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 30th April 2014

Alan Parker

Want To Know Why It Took 'The Commitments' 25 Years To Get To The West End?


Roddy Doyle Alan Parker The Commitments

The Commitments, the hugely successful and popular film by Sir Alan Parker based on the bestselling book the same name, is heading to the stage. The story of working-class Dubliners who form an unlikely soul band appears to be a perfect fit for the West End stage, and you'd be forgiven for assuming it's already a musical, so why has it taken some 25 years to get it there?

One huge reason is that writer Roddy Doyle thought he did not like musicals. "I'd never been to one," he said whilst announcing the show in London this week. The Booker prize-winning novelist said he'd had something of an epiphany when he began attending musicals once his children grew up. "I think the first was The Producers. It was quite a revelation because the film is terrific and I was wondering why would you want to do a musical? And actually it was great, it was very funny and sharp and you forgot about the film quite quickly," he told reporters at the announcement.

Continue reading: Want To Know Why It Took 'The Commitments' 25 Years To Get To The West End?

Got Tickets For Sergei Polunin in Midnight Express? You Might Wanna' Read This...


Alan Parker Oliver Stone

Ukrainian dance star Sergei Polunin has walked out on the cast of the major new ballet show Midnight Express just days before its UK premiere at London's Coliseum. The production, based on Billy Hayes's 1977 Turkish prison story, was due to open on Tuesday (April 9, 2013), though Polunin - its primary draw - has dropped out.

The production's director and choreographer, Peter Schaufuss, said Polunin failed to turn up for rehearsals on Wednesday. A statement put the departure down to "unforeseen circumstances," which essentially means nobody has a clue what's going on or where he is. Johan Christensen will take over the title role of Billy Hayes.

This is familiar territory for the Ukrainian star, who unexpectedly quit the Royal Ballet last year. At 19, he had become the company's youngest male principal though shocked the dance world by quitting before he was due to appear in a production of The Dream, later telling the BBC that he was no fan of rehearsing and that it was only when performing that he enjoyed to dance. Fair enough.

Continue reading: Got Tickets For Sergei Polunin in Midnight Express? You Might Wanna' Read This...

First Light Awards

Sir Alan Parker - First Light Awards held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 19th March 2013

Sir Alan Parker
Sir Alan Parker
Sir Alan Parker

Bafta Arrivals

Sir Alan Parker - BAFTA Arrivals at British Academy Film Awards - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 10th February 2013

Picture - Sir Alan Parker and his... , Sunday 10th February 2013

Sir Alan Parker and his wife Lisa Parker The 2013 EE British Academy Film Awards held at the Royal Opera House - Arrivals Featuring: Sir Alan Parker and his wife Lisa Parker Where: London, United Kingdom When: 10 Feb 2013

Bugsy Malone Review


Grim
Fourteen-year-old Jodie Foster had a very busy and very weird year in 1976. There was Freaky Friday for Disney, there was Taxi Driver for Scorsese, and then there was this. Thirty years after its release, Bugsy Malone, an adult gangster comedy/musical in which all the roles are played by children, can make you nostalgic for the '70s and the '30s at the same time. That this oddity was directed by Alan "Midnight Express" Parker, only makes the whole thing more bizarre. Watching the always amazing Jodie vamp it up with her co-star, '70s teen dreamboat Scott Baio, as they lip sync to tracks of the adults who sing for them is one of the stranger cinematic experiences you'll ever have. Forgive me if I pause a moment to go look up more synonyms for "weird."

Basically a story of warring gangs, Bugsy Malone introduces us to Fat Sam (John Cassisi) and Dandy Dan (Martin Lev), who are battling for turf. Bugsy (Baio) shows up at Sam's bar and meets Blousey Brown (Florrie Duggal), who wants to be a star. When the bar is raided, Dandy Dan breaks out his new weapon, a "Splurge gun" that shoots whipped cream. Bugsy and Blousey hit it off, but he's also caught the eye of sexy vamp Talullah (Foster), who always gets her man. Do you care?

Continue reading: Bugsy Malone Review

Bugsy Malone Review


Grim
Fourteen-year-old Jodie Foster had a very busy and very weird year in 1976. There was Freaky Friday for Disney, there was Taxi Driver for Scorsese, and then there was this. Thirty years after its release, Bugsy Malone, an adult gangster comedy/musical in which all the roles are played by children, can make you nostalgic for the '70s and the '30s at the same time. That this oddity was directed by Alan "Midnight Express" Parker, only makes the whole thing more bizarre. Watching the always amazing Jodie vamp it up with her co-star, '70s teen dreamboat Scott Baio, as they lip sync to tracks of the adults who sing for them is one of the stranger cinematic experiences you'll ever have. Forgive me if I pause a moment to go look up more synonyms for "weird."

Basically a story of warring gangs, Bugsy Malone introduces us to Fat Sam (John Cassisi) and Dandy Dan (Martin Lev), who are battling for turf. Bugsy (Baio) shows up at Sam's bar and meets Blousey Brown (Florrie Duggal), who wants to be a star. When the bar is raided, Dandy Dan breaks out his new weapon, a "Splurge gun" that shoots whipped cream. Bugsy and Blousey hit it off, but he's also caught the eye of sexy vamp Talullah (Foster), who always gets her man. Do you care?

Continue reading: Bugsy Malone Review

Angel Heart Review


OK
A decade before Hollywood got obsessed with urban volcanoes, asteroid impacts, and Steve Prefontaine -- offering us multiple movies about each topic -- the Big Bastardized Theme of the year was an inexplicable one: Voodoo. In 1987-88, three major voodoo-themed movies came out, including Angel Heart, The Serpent and the Rainbow, and The Believers. Each was tackled by a major director, and none of them made a huge splash critically or commercially. In fact, they all made pretty much the same amount at the box office -- slightly under $20 million.

So put aside your quizzical concern over why Angel Heart merits a special edition DVD (Robert De Niro's performance alone is worth it), and dig back into this quirky project from yesteryear, when we were all scared to death that a cowrie shell or a chicken claw was going to cause bugs to start crawling out of our face. Angel Heart (based on the novel Fallen Angel) is a 1950s period piece and starts out simply enough: An eccentric, sharp-fingernailed man named Louis Cyphre (De Niro) hires private eye Harry Angel (Mickey Rourke) to track down a missing person with whom Cyphre has an old (and unhonored) contract. Rourke's investigation takes him into the seedy underbelly of New Orleans and the Louisiana swamp. Virtually every one Angel speaks to turns up dead within days, but he plows ahead anyway. In the end he hooks up with a young voodoo priestess (Lisa Bonet when she had a career), and, well, the whole thing gets a little kooky. It's hard to write much about the utlimate resolution of Angel Heart without giving too much away, but suffice it to say it's at once obvious and surprising, considering the very thinly-veiled dialogue and unsubtle imagery.

Continue reading: Angel Heart Review

Angela's Ashes Review


Weak
Cigarettes.

The title: Angela's Ashes refers to cigarettes and not cremation. If someone had told me this before I had entered the film, I might have enjoyed it more than I did. Then again, if someone had told me about the rest of the film, I might have asked for a final cigarette before going in to Angela's Ashes.

Continue reading: Angela's Ashes Review

The Life of David Gale Review


Grim
Let's start by clearing up a common misconception: Despite an uninspired and pretentious title that indicates to the contrary, The Life of David Gale is not a true story. Laughably, even the Austin Visitors Bureau posted on its web site that it's based on fact! (The film was shot at and around The University of Texas at Austin (my alma mater), dubbed The University of Austin in the film for soon-to-be-apparent reasons.) Now one would think that a story about an anti-death penalty activist who ends up on death row himself would jog some memories at the Bureau, but oh well. Maybe it's just wishful thinking. Not much of historical note has happened in Austin since Charles Whitman's shooting spree killed 16 people in 1966.

This is a movie meant to be a sophisticated take on criminal punishment, but unfortunately it's actually the kind of garden variety thriller that Hollywood pumps out with one thought: to keep you guessing what surprise The Big Twist will bring. Unconvinced? Recent garbage like High Crimes and Reindeer Games leap to mind. Same formula, same disastrous results.

Continue reading: The Life of David Gale Review

Evita Review


Grim
Now I understand why Argentineans wanted Madonna to go home during the filming of Evita!

What the fuss is all about, I have no idea, because Evita is just another bad movie starring one of our worst actresses, Madonna. The catch is, this time she gets to sing sing sing for 2 1/2 hours -- sing until she can sing no more -- sing until your ears bleed.

Continue reading: Evita Review

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