Alan Moore

Alan Moore

Alan Moore Quick Links

News Pictures Film RSS

Fox Working on 'The League of Extraordinary Gentleman' Reboot


Alan Moore

20th Century Fox and Davis Entertainment are working on a TV reboot of The League of Extraordinary Gentleman following the distinctly lacklustre reboot in 2003. According to insiders, the series is likely to be far more aligned with Alan Moore's original comic book series than the recent movie.

Alan MooreAlan Moore's The League of Extraordinary Gentleman is to be adapted for the small-screen by Fox

Those critically acclaimed comics followed literary icons Alan Quatermain, Captain Nemo, Mina Harker, Rodney Skinner, Secret Service agent Sawyer, Dr Jekyll/Mr Hyde and Dorian Gray. The award-winning series ran for fifteen issues and two graphic novels.

Continue reading: Fox Working on 'The League of Extraordinary Gentleman' Reboot

Alan Moore signs copies of his book 'Fashion Beast'

Alan Moore - Alan Moore signs copies of his book 'Fashion Beast' at Waterstones Piccadilly - London, United Kingdom - Friday 6th September 2013

Alan Moore

Watchmen: The Complete Motion Comic Review


Excellent
With all the hype surrounding Zack Snyder's adaptation of the seminal graphic novel, it's interesting to see how little focus there has been on the literary aspect of the release itself. Oh sure, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons get name-checked frequently, their brilliant 12-installment comic creating the basis for this anticipated geek event. But with the anticipated blockbuster waiting in the wings, it would be nice to give the masterful, multilayered novel its full due. Now, thanks to Warner Brothers and DC, we are being treated to an inventive "motion comic" of the entire Watchmen tome, and aside from a couple of creative choices, it's a magnificent way to get introduced to this compelling, complicated work.

When Edward Blake, otherwise known as masked hero The Comedian, is killed, one of his former colleagues, Rorschach, decides to investigate. Rorschach soon uncovers what he believes is a plot to destroy all costumed vigilantes once and for all. Ever since the United States passed the Keane Act, effectively outlawing caped crusaders, individuals like himself, female fighter Silk Spectre, good guy Nite Owl II and media star Ozymandias have had to give up the cloak. Only Jon Osterman, aka the radioactive mutant Dr. Manhattan, has been cleared by the government to continue protecting the planet -- and he senses something horrible in the air. As Rorschach gets closer to discovering the truth, he is framed for murder. It is up to Silk and Nite Owl to save him, before Dr. Manhattan's horrific hunches come true.

Continue reading: Watchmen: The Complete Motion Comic Review

V for Vendetta Review


Excellent
A handful of films released during the 2005 Oscar race raised important questions about the unchecked influence of government. Stephen Gaghan's Syriana probed the unholy marriage of business and politics in the Middle East. George Clooney's Best Picture nominee Good Night, and Good Luck examined the witch-hunting tactics of Senator Joseph McCarthy and the media's subsequent response.

For a while, Hollywood had returned to the conspiracy-theory vibe of the 1970s, when political dialect and public paranoia drove plot lines and inspired the creative minds of Francis Ford Coppola, Alan J. Pakula, and Sidney Lumet. I'm happy to report that the conversations prompted by Gaghan and Clooney are carrying over into 2006 with James McTeigue's V for Vendetta, an open rebellion against society's close-mindedness that's based on Alan Moore's incendiary graphic novel (though the irritable author has renounced any cinematic version of his work).

Continue reading: V for Vendetta Review

Alan Moore

Alan Moore Quick Links

News Pictures Film RSS