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LCM s/s 2016: One For The Boys Charity Ball

Aidan Quinn - LCM s/s 2016: One For The Boys Charity Ball held at the Roundhouse - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Friday 12th June 2015

Aidan Quinn

Video - 'Elementary' Stars Johnny Lee Miller And Lucy Liu At Paleyfest Made In NY


As part of the Paleyfest Made In NY event, the Paley Center for Media unveil a screening for crime drama 'Elementary' which has recently begun its second season.

Continue: Video - 'Elementary' Stars Johnny Lee Miller And Lucy Liu At Paleyfest Made In NY

PaleyFest Elementary

L to R, Jon Michael Hill, Aidan Quinn, Lucy Liu and Jonny Lee Miller - The Paley Center for Media Presents Paleyfest Made In NY Elementary at The Paley Center 10 05 13 - NYC, NY, United States - Sunday 6th October 2013

L to R, Jon MIchael Hill, Aidan Quinn, Lucy Liu and Jonny Lee Miller
Jon MIchael Hill
L to R, Jon MIchael Hill, Aidan Quinn, Lucy Liu and Jonny Lee Miller
Jon MIchael Hill
L to R, Jon MIchael Hill, Aidan Quinn, Lucy Liu and Jonny Lee Miller

'Elementary' set

Aidan Quinn and Lucy Liu - Jonny Lee Miller, Aidan Quinn and Lucy Liu on the set of 'Elementary' - New York City, NY, United States - Monday 11th March 2013

Aidan Quinn
Aidan Quinn and Lucy Liu
Aidan Quinn
Aidan Quinn and Lucy Liu
Aidan Quinn and Lucy Liu

Opening night of 'Cat On A Hot Tin Roof'

Aidan Quinn and Elizabeth Bracco - Opening night of 'Cat On A Hot Tin Roof' New York City New York United States Thursday 17th January 2013

Aidan Quinn

2012 CBS Upfronts at The Tent at Lincoln Center

Aidan Quinn, Jonny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu - Aidan Quinn, Lucy Liu, Jonny Lee Miller Wednesday 16th May 2012 2012 CBS Upfronts at The Tent at Lincoln Center

Sarah's Key Trailer


In the present day, New York journalist Julia Jarmond is asked to work on an article about the Vel'd'Hiv Roundup of Jews by French authorities in 1942. Julia and her French husband, Bertrand, move to an apartment in Paris, where a Jewish family, the Starzynski's, once lived, until they were rounded up.

Continue: Sarah's Key Trailer

Sarah's Key [Elle S'appelait Sarah] Review


Excellent
Framing a harrowing story as an investigative mystery, this film carries a powerful emotional punch but never pushes the sentimentality. It also gives Scott Thomas yet another remarkable role to sink her teeth into.

Julia (Scott Thomas) is an American journalist living in Paris with her husband Bertrand (Pierrot) and their teen daughter (Hin). As they remodel Bertrand's family flat in the Marais, Julia is working on a story for her magazine about Parisian families who in 1942 were deported to Nazi camps in the most hideous conditions. Then one story catches her eye because it is linked to the flat.

And she starts to dig around, talking to Bertrand's father (Duchaussoy) and grandmother (Casadesus) to get to the truth.

Continue reading: Sarah's Key [Elle S'appelait Sarah] Review

Unknown Review


OK
With a Hitchcockian mistaken-identity plot, this film can't help but draw us into its slickly woven web of mystery. Although if we look to closely, each preposterous scene demands us to accept an increasingly wobbly sense of logic.

Martin (Neeson) is a scientist in Berlin with his wife Liz (Jones) for a conference, but he and his taxi driver Gina (Kruger) are involved in an accident that leaves him in a coma for four days. When he wakes up, Liz doesn't know him and insists that another man (Quinn) is actually Martin. Desperate for help, Martin contacts former Stasi agent Jurgen (Ganz), who starts digging into the situation, as well as a trusted colleague (Langella). But ruthless killers (Schneider and Erceg) are on his trail.

Continue reading: Unknown Review

Unknown Trailer


When Dr. Martin Harris awakes in a hospital in Berlin after an almost fatal car crash which put him in a coma for four days; he finds himself alone, his wife was also in the car with him but she's nowhere to be found. Worried for her safety Harris sets out to find her but when he eventually does, she does not recognise him and a stranger has assumed his identity.

Continue: Unknown Trailer

Flipped Trailer


When Bryce and his family move to a new neighbourhood, his next door neighbour is a girl of the same age called Juli is infatuated with him from the first moment her eyes spotted him. From that moment on, she knows Bryce is the boy for her; the only problem is Bryce isn't convinced that she's the girl for him.

Continue: Flipped Trailer

Dark Matter Review


Good
In his feature-film debut, well-regarded Chinese opera director Chen Shi-Zheng makes a strong impression with Dark Matter, the story of a Chinese cosmology genius invited to America to join the team of a legendary cosmologist only to find that America isn't quite the land of opportunity that he had been brought up to believe. Based on the true story of a Chinese student who went ballistic at a major American university in the early '90s, Shi-Zheng's film, which originally premiered at last year's Sundance Film Festival, was held from release after the shootings at Virginia Tech last April. Now, only a few days before the anniversary of the Virginia Tech massacre, it would seem the pushback, though well-meaning, was useless.

Broken into five acts represented by symbols of the five elements, the film begins with Liu Xing (a very good Liu Ye) walking into a Western university to meet and join legendary cosmology theorist Jacob Reiser (Aidan Quinn). Funded by socialite Joanna Silver (Meryl Streep), an avatar of America's fetishizing of Eastern tradition, Liu is invited to experience monuments of fake Americana (a mock ghost town) and droll bits of Chinese history. Her husband (Bill Irwin) sees it simply as a tax write-off, but Joanna has a deep want for things outside her closeted realm.

Continue reading: Dark Matter Review

Music of the Heart Review


Good
The creator of A Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream is toying with our conscience again, only this time his weaponry isn't Freddy's claws or a murderous prank caller. Director Wes Craven's latest endeavor, Music of the Heart, switches gears to more virtuous human emotions in order to tell us the story of one woman's triumph and the revival of a downtrodden urban community. Oddly enough, this film is just as powerful as any of Craven's horror films and can evoke strong emotion and sentiment, if you let it.

Music of the Heart begins like any of the other "triumphant teacher" dramas we've all seen. Stand and Deliver and Dangerous Minds both crossed my mind as I sat through the first hour of Roberta Guaspari's (Meryl Streep) struggle to teach a handful of young urban kids how to play the violin. This part of the story is hackneyed and clichéd, and you've seen it before--if not in a previous movie than in some boring after-school special. But where other "triumphant teacher" dramas fail because they concentrate too much on the saintliness of the teacher, this movie succeeds in its captivation of Roberta Guaspari's character flaws, and her struggle as a single mother attempting to raise her two children in East Harlem. When the film expands beyond the existence of just "Roberta the teacher" and into the rest of her life, the film becomes genuinely enjoyable.

Continue reading: Music of the Heart Review

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1994) Review


Grim
This is what happens when a studio lets a director do whatever they want. Kenneth Branagh (Henry V, Dead Again), has really lost his mind on this one. Frankenstein is a bloody mess (in both artistry and gore-level) and is extremely difficult to watch.

Frankenstein is supposed to be a story of a scientist (Branagh himself, in this adaptation) obsessed with reviving the dead. Branagh must have had some pages missing from his copy of Mary Shelley's book--it seems like there are large chunks of movie missing here and there. The dialogue is silly, the plot is convoluted beyond the normal Hollywood trashing of literature, and the characters are contradictory and really pretty stupid for educated Swiss aristocrats.

Continue reading: Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1994) Review

In Dreams Review


Grim
Neil Jordan (The Crying Game) just keeps going down down down. This time, it's a "thriller" about a loony who controls the dreams of Bening, making her loony as well. The loony (I'll kill the "suspense"--it's Downey) also kills her daughter and husband, you know, just for kicks. And there's apples apples apples galore! You know, for symbolism. I think.

Continue reading: In Dreams Review

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