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King Arthur Legend of the Sword Trailer


Arthur might have an extraordinary destiny, but after his birthright was taken from him at a young age, he has grown up an agent of the streets of Londonium and now the idea that he has royal blood is almost laughable. That is until he manages to unsheath the mighty sword of Excalibur from a stone; a feat that can only be achieved be he who is worthy of the throne. This forces him to make a choice, he can ignore the destiny that is pressing in around him or he can seize it once and for all. He joins the kingdom's resistance and it's there he meets the beautiful Guinevere who encourages him to learn of the power that he wields and defeat the tyrannous Vortigern, avenging his parents and ending his rule for good.

Continue: King Arthur Legend of the Sword Trailer

Sing Street Trailer


Conor lives in Dublin and for the past 13 years, he's had a nice comfortable life. He lives with his brother and his mum and dad and was privileged enough to have a private education; however as his folks start having money problems Conor finds himself at the local school in surroundings he's unfamiliar with. 

Nothing comes easy for the teen but he makes a couple of friends and when he spots a girl called Raphina, he knows that she's the girl he's meant to be with. Growing up in the 80's, you weren't anyone unless you were in a band and Conor has just hatched a plan in his mind that's sure to see him climb the social ladder - and more importantly win the heart of his new beau - Conor is going to start a band and Raphina is going to be the lead star in their first music video. The only problem is at the moment there's no band. 

Changing his name to Cosmo and recruiting some more guys to join his band, Cosmo sets fame and the girl of his dreams in his sights.

Aidan Gillen - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at The Shrine Expo Hall, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen - Celebrity guests arrive at RTÉ Studios for 'The Late Late Show' - Dublin, Ireland - Friday 19th December 2014

Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen - New York Premiere of 'Game of Thrones' Season 4 held at Avery Fisher Lincoln Center - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 18th March 2014

Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen and Killian Scott - Guests arrive at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival opening Gala premiere of 'Calvary' at The Savoy... - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 13th February 2014

Aidan Gillen and Killian Scott
Killian Scott and Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen and Killian Scott

Aidan Gillen (plays Charlie Haughey) - RTE drama trilogy 'Citizen Charlie' being filmed at Dublin Castle - Dublin, Ireland - Wednesday 11th December 2013

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Cinema This Weekend? You Could Do Worse Than 'Mister John' [Trailer]


Aidan Gillen

In a packed and highly competitive weekend at the UK box-office, Mister John is likely to pass through unnoticed. Kristen Wiig is in town with her quirky comedy Girl Most Likely, while Ben Affleck and Justin Timberlake head up Runner, Runner and Hugh Jackman and Jake Gyllenhaal star in the well-received Prisoners. Oh, and there's Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine and Austenland. But spare a thought, and perhaps a few quid for Mister John, the new drama from Helen directors Joe Lawlor and Christine Molloy.

Aidan Gillen Mister JohnThe Official Poster For 'Mister John'

It follows a man named Gerry (Aidan Gillen) who leaves London to look after his deceased brother's business in Singapore after discovering his wife's infidelities. Arriving in a world of opportunity, Gerry slips into his sibling's life both emotionally and physically. However, he struggles with the realisation that his loved ones remain in the UK and Gerry must choose between becoming his brother's alter ego 'Mister John' or returning to London to face his failing relationship.

Continue reading: Cinema This Weekend? You Could Do Worse Than 'Mister John' [Trailer]

Aidan Gillen - The cast of Love/Hate were among guests who attended the opening night of 'Howie The Rookie' starring Tom Vaughan Lawlor at the Project Arts Centre, - Dublin, Ireland - Monday 17th June 2013

Aidan Gillen
Robert Sheehan and Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen - Premiere of the third season of HBO Series 'Game of Thrones' - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United States - Monday 18th March 2013

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen Wednesday 4th July 2012 Actor Aidan Gillen spotted walking with his bike near the Georges Street Arcade

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Shadow Dancer Trailer


Colette McVeigh is a single mother who lives with her mother in Belfast. She is a republican with tyrannical brothers in the IRA. After a terminated plot to bomb London, she is arrested for the part she played in the scheme. MI5 agent Mac offers her a choice: go to prison for 25 years (after all, she is a terrorist), or go home to her mother and son and, in turn, spy on her extremist family and pass on information to Mac. However, no sooner has she become Mac's informant than Colette is in grave danger after suspicions are raised following an ambushed secret operation of her brothers'.

Continue: Shadow Dancer Trailer

Aidan Gillen Thursday 15th March 2012 out and about on Grafton St

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Treacle Jr. Review


Very Good
Gillen reteams with The Low Down writer-director Thraves for another meandering, improv-style London drama. And Thraves keeps us engaged with the central relationship even when his filmmaking gets a bit pushy.

Tom (Fisher) leaves his wife and child and quietly takes a train to London, where he starts living on the street. His drop-out idyll is disrupted first by street thugs and then by the smiling, chatty Aidan (Gillen), who lives with his controlling "girlfriend" Linda (Steele). He makes money through odd jobs, including taking his neighbour's (Cohen) cat Treacle into cafes to scare off mice. Tom finds shaking off the clingy Aidan virtually impossible, and eventually starts to soften toward him. Although Linda is another story.

Continue reading: Treacle Jr. Review

Aidan Gillen Thursday 9th June 2011 The cast of new Irish movie 'Shadow Dancer' (Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson, Michael McElhatton & Others) seen on set where Dublin City was made to look like Belfast during The Troubles until rain stopped play! Dublin, Ireland

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Atmosphere and Aidan Gillen
Atmosphere and Aidan Gillen
Atmosphere and Aidan Gillen
Atmosphere and Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen Thursday 21st April 2011 The opening night of 'The Big Fellah' play at The Gaiety Theatre - Arrivals Dublin, Ireland

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Wake Wood Review


Excellent
With deliberate echoes of classic Hammer horror, this moody and inventive thriller gets under our skin with its deeply personal plot, which pays as much attention to horror as emotion. And if the low budget shows, the unsettling premise more than makes up for it.

After the tragic death of their daughter Alice (Connolly) in England, veterinarian Patrick (Gillen) and chemist Louise (Birthistle) relocate to the tiny Irish village of Wake Wood. While settling into rural life they stumble across a creepy local ritual that might reunite them with their daughter for three days. They talk to the village elder (Spall) and agree to the rules, but they have a secret that could be their undoing. Then when they get Alice back, they decide to keep her. Although there's a heavy penalty for breaking the rules.

Continue reading: Wake Wood Review

12 Rounds Review


Weak
You might think that 12 Rounds is the exact same movie as The Marine, an already-forgotten 2007 action movie also starring wrestler-turned-pretty-much-still-just-a-wrestler John Cena, but you'd be wrong. In The Marine, Cena plays an unstoppable marine whose wife gets kidnapped by very bad men. In 12 Rounds, Cena plays an unstoppable police officer whose girlfriend gets kidnapped by a very bad Irishman. Completely different.

Cena, to his credit, shows slightly more dimension in his second starring vehicle. As Detective Danny Fisher, he expresses a surprising (for an action hero) amount of guilt over a bust of master criminal/terrorist Miles Jackson (Aidan Gillen), the aforementioned Irishman, which resulted in the accidental death of Jackson's equally psychotic lady love. Exactly one year later, as both the subtitles and expositional dialogue tell us, Jackson resurfaces to exact his revenge: He takes Fisher's beloved Molly (Ashley Scott), and puts the cop through a series of death-defying stunts.

Continue reading: 12 Rounds Review

The Wire: Season Five Review


Extraordinary
Millions of hearts broke when season four of The Wire reached its bleak conclusion. The cause of this mass cardiac disintegration was twofold: first, most of the teenage boys in the season's primary storyline seemed doomed to nasty and short lives. And second, the single greatest work of dramatic television in the history of the medium had come to an end. That couldn't be easy for anyone's emotions.

Fifteen months later, The Wire returned for its brilliant swan song. David Simon, Ed Burns, and crew famously dedicated each season of The Wire to an institutional failure (the drug war, the middle class, political reform, the schools) that has contributed to the extended death of Baltimore, and by extension all of America's inner cities. For the show's final go-round, the show takes on the decline of local media. Simon spent years -- several of them tumultuous -- at the Baltimore Sun before he started creating amazing TV shows. Naturally, Simon brings much of his personal disaffection and melancholy to his portrayal of that disintegrating daily.

Continue reading: The Wire: Season Five Review

The Wire: Season Four Review


Essential
By the end of season three of The Wire -- aka HBO's best excuse for staying on the air -- one could sense that the show had, in some sense of the word, come to an end. It was certainly clear for a time that HBO executives thought so, having come close to canceling the multifaceted, frighteningly addictive urban drama yet again, as it never pulled anywhere near the kind of ratings that their warhorses like The Sopranos and Sex and the City had. Although plenty of strings were left dangling at the conclusion of episode 37, "Mission Accomplished," a chapter had been definitively closed, with Avon Barksdale back in jail, and his brainy partner Stringer Belle gunned down. Since the two of them had been the impressive foils to the strung-out cops in the Baltimore Major Crimes Unit, their departure seemed to leave a vacuum. With nobody of real consequence running the West Baltimore drug trade (the Barksdales' chief rival and replacement, Marlo Stanfield, seems at first nothing more than some punk kid), what would be left that was worth watching?

More than enough, it turns out.

Continue reading: The Wire: Season Four Review

Aidan Gillen - Sunday 25th November 2007 at Empire Leicester Square London, England

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen Friday 12th October 2007 Opening night of Glengarry Glen Ross at the Apollo Theatre and the after party celebration held at The Mint Leaf Restaurant London, England

Aidan Gillen
Jonathan Pryce and Aidan Gillen
Jonathan Pryce and Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

The Wire: Season Three Review


Essential

Sadly, the most passionate and persuasive argument in recent years against the current disposition of the government's stance in the so-called "War on Drugs" came not from a think tank armed with stats and big ideas or a celebrity eager for a cause, but from a TV show. The third season of The Wire, which aired on HBO in late 2004, continued its sprawling and justifiably lauded Dickensian crawl through its web of stories centering on the inner Baltimore drug trade -- following, with an unusual focus to detail and character, both the gangs fighting for territory and the cops of a major case unit assigned to busting up their organizations. But where the show became more than just an abnormally well-made, balanced, and realistic law and order drama (and there's no need here to heap more praise on the show than already has been done), and became something entirely different, was in the fourth episode, "Amsterdam."

Police major "Bunny" Colvin (previously a supporting player on the show), desperate to see some improvement in his crime-ridden West Baltimore district and tired of watching his cops waste all their time busting street corner dealers to no larger effect, institutes a new policy: If all drug dealers move to three designated zones in the district and sell there, they will not be arrested. In effect, he legalizes the drug trade in a large part of an American city. The cops don't get it, the drug-dealing kids don't either, as it throws into question the entire reality of their limited universe where the kids sell drugs, occasionally they get hassled or arrested, but everything goes on without change; as one of the dealers says, "Why you got to go and fuck with the program?"

The point being made here by the two creative forces behind The Wire -- investigative reporter David Simon and veteran detective Ed Burns, both of whom know this territory better than almost anyone -- is quite simple: the drug trade has atomized vast and forgotten swaths of American cities, like West Baltimore, and decades of simplistic, head-knocking, "tough on crime" enforcement has made zero difference. So, take a page out of Amsterdam's book, where a blind eye is turned to the drug traffic in certain designated areas, and see if you can at least make some poor neighborhoods normal again by ridding them of turf-battling drug gangs.

Colvin -- a strange kind of revolutionary -- gives a speech using the "brown paper bag" analogy Simon introduced in his book The Corner: Men drinking on the street will carry their liquor in a brown paper bag -- the cops know it's liquor but don't arrest them for public drinking because the men are at least making an attempt at hiding the bottle. It's the same with pushing drug dealing to what Colvin calls the "free zones"; it's a civil truce. Call it legalization, call it a truce, call it dealing with reality, Simon's point is that drugs will be dealt, and the more you can keep the trade itself from ruining the social fabric of already distressed neighborhoods, the better. And if you can weave this message into a thrilling hour-long crime drama, all the better.

As for what the remainder of this season dealt with, it would be futile to go into much discussion of that, since The Wire's storylines rival Tolstoy's in their complexity. Suffice it to say that one must watch the show as one reads a book, starting at the beginning of season three -- even with that "previously, on The Wire" intro which HBO prefaces its shows with -- is next to useless. For those who have already been watching, of primary importance is that the show's quality remains undimmed. Simon's writing staff has been beefed up by the addition of top-shelf novelists like Richard Price (Clockers) and George Pelecanos (The Night Gardener), who bring some welcome flourishes of both character-driven realism and pulp crime drama to the proceedings. A few of the show's more central characters get their arcs reversed, with the classically rogueish cop McNulty (a wonderfully snarky Dominic West) coming to a crisis of self-destruction, and striving criminal mastermind Stringer Bell (the iconic and contemplative Idris Elba) finding himself stuck between worlds, too street for the business world and too thoughtful for the street. And although several long-running characters continue to pop up -- like free-range gunslingers Omar (Michael K. Williams) and Brother Mouzone (Michael Potts), and Bubbles (Andre Royo), the junkie who serves as the closest thing The Wire has to a chorus -- story is always sublimated to the overarching themes, with the focus never straying far from Simon's central conceit of the American city in crisis, and what to do about it.

The Wire has cast a sardonic eye on the efficacy of current drug law enforcement since the beginning. In the very first episode, a detective who just used the term "War on Drugs" gets a quick schooling from another detective on why the term just doesn't apply, with the world-wearied quip, "Wars end." By presenting an idea for how one might, if not win a war that has done so much damage to American cities and the economically disadvantaged, then at least call an honorable truce, the show became not just the best show currently on television, but also possibly the most important.

Anyone else see Charlie Brown's shirt?

Shanghai Knights Review


Bad
I was in the minority of critics that actually gave Jackie Chan's last buddy picture The Tuxedo a passing grade. Sure, the plot is a throwaway and as Chan's super-spy partner, Jennifer Love Hewitt is a complete miscast. But thanks to Chan's great charisma, the movie transcends its doldrums. So with Shanghai Knights, the follow up to the entertaining Shanghai Noon, I feared this buddy story would suffer from similar inadequacies.

In Knights, Chan returns as Chon Wang, who along with sidekick Roy O'Bannon (Owen Wilson), take their latest adventure from the Wild Wild West to London, where Chon seeks to avenge the brutal slaying of his father and obtain the stolen Chinese Imperial Seal. While there, the pair teams up with Chon's much younger, hotter, and ass-kickinger sister, Lin (Fann Wong) to hunt down their father's killer, Rathbone (Aiden Gillen) and foil Rathbone's plot to assassinate the Royal family. The three certainly have their work cut out for them.

Continue reading: Shanghai Knights Review

Circle Of Friends Review


Very Good
Circle of Friends is the story of three Irish teenage girls, Eve, Nan, and Benny, and their respective quests for love. In 1957 Dublin and nearby Knockglen, we return to a time before the world lost its innocence, before our uncontrollable obsession with physical beauty took hold, and before we had any idea about how a relationship was supposed to work.

As the story opens, the three characters are entering their freshmen year at a Dublin college. Eve (Geraldine O'Rawe) is an orphan, living with the nuns in a convent. Nan (Saffron Burrows) is a gorgeous and wicked socialite with ulterior motives. And Benny (Minnie Driver) is a Plain Jane heroine, plagued by overbearing parents and a trollish suitor (Cumming), and is still trying to overcome her adolescent awkwardness. Chris O'Donnell plays Jack, "the cutest boy in school" who becomes the eventual point of contention in the story, developing a deep love for Benny, but perpetually confused and torn between those competing for his affections and attempts to control his future.

Continue reading: Circle Of Friends Review

The Low Down Review


Weak

Frank (Adien Gillen) is British. He makes TV props for a living. He smokes a lot and drinks with his mates. He has that restless, what's-my-life-about feeling of late-20s malaise.

"The Low Down" is supposed to be a movie about how Frank eventually pulls himself together with the help of a good woman, an optimistic young real estate agent named Ruby (Kate Ashfield). But until he does pull himself together, which isn't until literally 30 seconds before the credits roll, the film's cast of arguably interesting people don't do a thing worth paying eight bucks to watch.

I hardly took any notes at the screening of this film because there just wasn't much to write about. Frank has trouble with the lashing-out of an artistically bored business partner pal. He half-heartedly looks for a condo until Ruby catches on that he just wants to see her and not so much the flats she shows him.

Continue reading: The Low Down Review

Shanghai Knights Review


Very Good

Jackie Chan told me in an interview last year (which I failed to get written up -- sorry!) that the sequel to his kung-fu comedy-Western "Shanghai Noon" was "five times better than the first one." I didn't believe him. Jackie, I apologize.

Riding high on Chan's chemistry with Owen Wilson -- reigning king of the acerbic ad-lib -- "Shanghai Knights" is hilariously tongue-in-cheek and packed with comical homages to everything from the Keystone Kops and Harry Houdini to The Beatles and "Taxi Driver."

Although it might not quite measure up to Chan's claim of quintuple the quality, it is one of those rare multiplex delights: A sequel that bests its predecessor in nearly every way.

Continue reading: Shanghai Knights Review

Aidan Gillen

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Aidan Gillen

Date of birth

24th April, 1968

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.78


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Aidan Gillen Movies

Maze Runner: The Death Cure Trailer

Maze Runner: The Death Cure Trailer

Thomas (Dylan O'Brien) and his fellow Gladers have fought their way out of a Griever-infested...

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Movie Review

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Movie Review

It's unlikely that Guy Ritchie could make a boring movie if he wanted to. This...

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King Arthur Trailer

King Arthur Trailer

Arthur grew up as a peasant on the streets of Londonium having escaped the terror...

The Lovers Trailer

The Lovers Trailer

Mary (Debra Winger) and Michael (Tracy Letts) have been married for a long time and,...

King Arthur Legend of the Sword Trailer

King Arthur Legend of the Sword Trailer

Arthur might have an extraordinary destiny, but after his birthright was taken from him at...

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