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The Lovers Trailer


Mary (Debra Winger) and Michael (Tracy Letts) have been married for a long time and, like in so many long-term partnerships, their passion has cooled and they no longer fulfill each other romantically. As a result of this, both of them stray and begin serious affairs with other lovers (without each other knowing). Eventually, they decide to make the enormous decision of asking for a divorce, but neither of them can find it in their hearts to do it. Their lovers are getting angry and frustrated, and once again they find themselves in the arms of one another. For whatever reason, a spark as reignited between them, and they embark on their most passionate affair yet - with each other. 

Continue: The Lovers Trailer

King Arthur Legend of the Sword Trailer


Arthur might have an extraordinary destiny, but after his birthright was taken from him at a young age, he has grown up an agent of the streets of Londonium and now the idea that he has royal blood is almost laughable. That is until he manages to unsheath the mighty sword of Excalibur from a stone; a feat that can only be achieved be he who is worthy of the throne. This forces him to make a choice, he can ignore the destiny that is pressing in around him or he can seize it once and for all. He joins the kingdom's resistance and it's there he meets the beautiful Guinevere who encourages him to learn of the power that he wields and defeat the tyrannous Vortigern, avenging his parents and ending his rule for good.

Continue: King Arthur Legend of the Sword Trailer

Aidan Gillen - Los Angeles premiere for season 6 of HBO's 'Game of Thrones' - Arrivals at Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 10th April 2016

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen - 'Game of Thrones' Season 6 premiere screening held at TCL Chinese Theater IMAX at TCL Chinese Theater IMAX - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 10th April 2016

Aidan Gillen

Sing Street Trailer


Conor lives in Dublin and for the past 13 years, he's had a nice comfortable life. He lives with his brother and his mum and dad and was privileged enough to have a private education; however as his folks start having money problems Conor finds himself at the local school in surroundings he's unfamiliar with. 

Nothing comes easy for the teen but he makes a couple of friends and when he spots a girl called Raphina, he knows that she's the girl he's meant to be with. Growing up in the 80's, you weren't anyone unless you were in a band and Conor has just hatched a plan in his mind that's sure to see him climb the social ladder - and more importantly win the heart of his new beau - Conor is going to start a band and Raphina is going to be the lead star in their first music video. The only problem is at the moment there's no band. 

Changing his name to Cosmo and recruiting some more guys to join his band, Cosmo sets fame and the girl of his dreams in his sights.

Aidan Gillen - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at The Shrine Expo Hall, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen - Celebrity guests arrive at RTÉ Studios for 'The Late Late Show' - Dublin, Ireland - Friday 19th December 2014

Aidan Gillen

Ambition Trailer


Human ambition is the thing that shapes the world and moulds our futures. From our ventures into space, our studies of evolution and experiments in human and animal reproduction, mankind will never stop searching for answers in a bid to gain more and more control of the planet and, ultimately, the universe. When one young apprentice sets out to understand and use nanotechnology in an unfamiliar environment, her ambitions are simply to show just how capable she is to the ultimate authority, but it seems her dreams are nowhere near reachable at this stage. The question is, will she overcome all odds or will she fail at the final hurdle?

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'Game Of Thrones' Actor Aidan Gillen Cast As Villain In 'The Maze Runner' Sequel


Aidan Gillen Will Poulter Thomas Sangster Kaya Scodelario Dylan O'Brien Chris Sheffield

Aidan Gillen, the actor best known for his role as Lord Petyr Baelish A.K.A. Littlefinger on Game of Thrones, has been cast as the villain in the upcoming sequel to The Maze Runner.

Aiden Gillen
Aiden Gillen will appear in The Maze Runner sequel.

Read More: The Maze Runner Records One Of Biggest September Openings, Ever.

Continue reading: 'Game Of Thrones' Actor Aidan Gillen Cast As Villain In 'The Maze Runner' Sequel

Calvary Review


Excellent

After the 2011 black comedy The Guard, Brendan Gleeson reteams with writer-director John Michael McDonagh for a darker comical drama grappling with issues of faith and forgiveness. McDonagh's usual jagged dialogue and snappy characters are on-hand in abundance while the film digs deep through a rather meandering, episodic plot.

In rural Ireland, Father James (Brendan Gleeson) is quietly enduring confessionals when one of his parishioners says he's going to kill him next Sunday. Shaken, James begins to explore his faith and mortality over the coming week. His daughter Fiona (Kelly Reilly) arrives following another suicide attempt, and he consoles a grieving French visitor (Marie-Josee Croze) and visits an imprisoned killer (Domhnall Gleeson). But almost anyone in the village could be the aspiring murderer: the over-emotional butcher (Chris O'Dowd), drug-addict doctor (Aidan Gillen), ladies-man African (Isaach De Bankole), shifty millionaire (Dylan Moran), eccentric fisherman (M. Emmet Walsh).

Intriguingly, it never really matters who issued the threat (James has a pretty good idea), because that's not the point of the film. McDonagh is exploring bigger ideas here, adeptly mixing riotously funny dialogue with startlingly bleak emotions. The film's languid pace nearly lulls us to sleep, then wakes us up with another sparky scene-stealing performance from the gifted cast. Gleeson is wonderfully muted, expressing more with an exhausted sigh than most actors can manage with a Shakespearean monologue. His moments with Reilly crackle with honest emotion, and the deceptively simple scene between father and son actors Brendan and Domhnall is a heart-stopper.

Continue reading: Calvary Review

Aidan Gillen - New York Premiere of 'Game of Thrones' Season 4 held at Avery Fisher Lincoln Center - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 18th March 2014

Aidan Gillen

Aidan Gillen and Killian Scott - Guests arrive at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival opening Gala premiere of 'Calvary' at The Savoy... - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 13th February 2014

Aidan Gillen and Killian Scott
Killian Scott and Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen and Killian Scott

Calvary Trailer


Father James Lavelle is a good-natured priest whose life is thrown into confusion and disarray when an anonymous man tells him in confession that he will kill him in a week's time - the only reason being because Lavelle is an innocent man. Of all the shocking things he's ever heard in confession, none have thrown him quite as much as this. Unable to go to the police under the rules of the 'Seal of the Confessional', Lavelle consults his church peers pondering whether it was merely an idle threat, or whether his life really is in danger. In his apparent last week in existence, he scrutinises the corrupt individuals of his sin-filled parish, wondering along the way why people seem to focus more on their vices than their virtues, but when his beloved church is burnt to the ground, his views on good and evil become distorted.

'Calvary' is the darkly comic drama about the timeless story of good and evil, and guilt and innocence. It has been directed and written by BAFTA nominated John Michael McDonagh ('The Guard', 'Ned Kelly') and is set in Ireland's beautiful West Coast countryside. The film is set to be released on April 11th 2014.

Click here to read - Calvary Movie Review

Aidan Gillen (plays Charlie Haughey) - RTE drama trilogy 'Citizen Charlie' being filmed at Dublin Castle - Dublin, Ireland - Wednesday 11th December 2013

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Cinema This Weekend? You Could Do Worse Than 'Mister John' [Trailer]


Aidan Gillen

In a packed and highly competitive weekend at the UK box-office, Mister John is likely to pass through unnoticed. Kristen Wiig is in town with her quirky comedy Girl Most Likely, while Ben Affleck and Justin Timberlake head up Runner, Runner and Hugh Jackman and Jake Gyllenhaal star in the well-received Prisoners. Oh, and there's Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine and Austenland. But spare a thought, and perhaps a few quid for Mister John, the new drama from Helen directors Joe Lawlor and Christine Molloy.

Aidan Gillen Mister JohnThe Official Poster For 'Mister John'

It follows a man named Gerry (Aidan Gillen) who leaves London to look after his deceased brother's business in Singapore after discovering his wife's infidelities. Arriving in a world of opportunity, Gerry slips into his sibling's life both emotionally and physically. However, he struggles with the realisation that his loved ones remain in the UK and Gerry must choose between becoming his brother's alter ego 'Mister John' or returning to London to face his failing relationship.

Continue reading: Cinema This Weekend? You Could Do Worse Than 'Mister John' [Trailer]

Mister John Trailer


Gerry Devine is faced with a dilemma after suffering two personal tragedies; his brother drowned near his home in Singapore and the mother of his child has been unfaithful in their marriage at home in London. The tiny but beautiful Far Eastern country offers him an idyllic escape and chance to start his life over when he ventures there to deal with his brother's business, an Irish bar called Mister Johns. Surrounded by a stunning landscape and desirable women, there's a large part of him that wants to remain, comforted by his attractive sister-in-law Kim. However, as he manages to get himself into some trouble and his wife continues to call him, miserable in his absence and desperately worried about their daughter, Gerry struggles to find the right path as his grief blurs his concept of what he believes is right and wrong.

Continue: Mister John Trailer

Shadow Dancer Review


Excellent
Like Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, this thriller refuses to burst out into action mode, preferring to keep its thrills cerebral as the characters circle around each other like sharks. It's a fiercely complex, intelligent film that's expertly handled by Marsh (Man on Wire) in his narrative directing debut. And while mainstream audiences may long for just one explosive car chase, there are plenty of resonant themes to hold our attention in other ways.

Riseborough gives her best-yet performance as Colette, a young IRA operative who visits London in 1993 and is arrested by MI5 agent Mac (Owen). He offers her a terrible deal she can't refuse: if she wants to avoid prison to raise her son, she'll have to return to Belfast and spy on her mother (Brennan) and activist brothers (Gillen and Gleeson). But when she gets home, she discovers that the IRA boss (Wilmot) knows there's a spy in their midst. Is he talking about her? Or is there another one? And Mac is also a bit nervous when his boss (Anderson) starts acting suspicious.

Continue reading: Shadow Dancer Review

Aidan Gillen - Aidan Gillen, Tuesday 21st August 2012 at the Irish premiere of 'Shadow Dancer'at the Lighthouse Cinema.

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen and James Marsh
Aidan Gillen
David Wilmot, Aidan Gillen, James Marsh and Michael Mcelhatton

Shadow Dancer Trailer


Colette McVeigh is a single mother who lives with her mother in Belfast. She is a republican with tyrannical brothers in the IRA. After a terminated plot to bomb London, she is arrested for the part she played in the scheme. MI5 agent Mac offers her a choice: go to prison for 25 years (after all, she is a terrorist), or go home to her mother and son and, in turn, spy on her extremist family and pass on information to Mac. However, no sooner has she become Mac's informant than Colette is in grave danger after suspicions are raised following an ambushed secret operation of her brothers'.

Continue: Shadow Dancer Trailer

Treacle Jr. Review


Very Good
Gillen reteams with The Low Down writer-director Thraves for another meandering, improv-style London drama. And Thraves keeps us engaged with the central relationship even when his filmmaking gets a bit pushy.

Tom (Fisher) leaves his wife and child and quietly takes a train to London, where he starts living on the street. His drop-out idyll is disrupted first by street thugs and then by the smiling, chatty Aidan (Gillen), who lives with his controlling "girlfriend" Linda (Steele). He makes money through odd jobs, including taking his neighbour's (Cohen) cat Treacle into cafes to scare off mice. Tom finds shaking off the clingy Aidan virtually impossible, and eventually starts to soften toward him. Although Linda is another story.

Continue reading: Treacle Jr. Review

Aidan Gillen Friday 20th May 2011 outside the ITV studios London, England

Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Blitz Review


Good
This British crime thriller is so unapologetic about recycling cliches that it's actually hilariously good fun to watch. Even with its glaring plot holes and camp performances, the cast and crew's chutzpah keeps it consistently entertaining.

Brant (Statham) is a bad-boy South East London detective always in trouble with the authorities. But he gets the job done, so his loyal chief (Rylance) protects him. His new challenge is to find a brazen psycho (Gillen) who's killing cops in cold blood. Working with new boss Nash (Considine), who's tormented for being gay, Brant starts bullishly breaking the rules to solve the case. Meanwhile, the killer is leaking information to a tabloid hack (Morrissey). And another of Brant's cop pals (Ashton) is struggling with returning to the job after her stint in rehab.

Continue reading: Blitz Review

Wake Wood Review


Excellent
With deliberate echoes of classic Hammer horror, this moody and inventive thriller gets under our skin with its deeply personal plot, which pays as much attention to horror as emotion. And if the low budget shows, the unsettling premise more than makes up for it.

After the tragic death of their daughter Alice (Connolly) in England, veterinarian Patrick (Gillen) and chemist Louise (Birthistle) relocate to the tiny Irish village of Wake Wood. While settling into rural life they stumble across a creepy local ritual that might reunite them with their daughter for three days. They talk to the village elder (Spall) and agree to the rules, but they have a secret that could be their undoing. Then when they get Alice back, they decide to keep her. Although there's a heavy penalty for breaking the rules.

Continue reading: Wake Wood Review

Blitz Trailer


When a psychopathic man sets out on a vicious killing spree targeting police officers the police force bring in a hard hitting cop called Brant in to investigate and hunt down the man who calls himself Blitz. Knowing the rampage will not stop until the man is captured the Brant must use all his wits to stay one step ahead of the killer who seems to have an intricate knowledge of the local police station and how they operate.

Continue: Blitz Trailer

12 Rounds Review


Weak
You might think that 12 Rounds is the exact same movie as The Marine, an already-forgotten 2007 action movie also starring wrestler-turned-pretty-much-still-just-a-wrestler John Cena, but you'd be wrong. In The Marine, Cena plays an unstoppable marine whose wife gets kidnapped by very bad men. In 12 Rounds, Cena plays an unstoppable police officer whose girlfriend gets kidnapped by a very bad Irishman. Completely different.

Cena, to his credit, shows slightly more dimension in his second starring vehicle. As Detective Danny Fisher, he expresses a surprising (for an action hero) amount of guilt over a bust of master criminal/terrorist Miles Jackson (Aidan Gillen), the aforementioned Irishman, which resulted in the accidental death of Jackson's equally psychotic lady love. Exactly one year later, as both the subtitles and expositional dialogue tell us, Jackson resurfaces to exact his revenge: He takes Fisher's beloved Molly (Ashley Scott), and puts the cop through a series of death-defying stunts.

Continue reading: 12 Rounds Review

The Wire: Season Five Review


Extraordinary
Millions of hearts broke when season four of The Wire reached its bleak conclusion. The cause of this mass cardiac disintegration was twofold: first, most of the teenage boys in the season's primary storyline seemed doomed to nasty and short lives. And second, the single greatest work of dramatic television in the history of the medium had come to an end. That couldn't be easy for anyone's emotions.

Fifteen months later, The Wire returned for its brilliant swan song. David Simon, Ed Burns, and crew famously dedicated each season of The Wire to an institutional failure (the drug war, the middle class, political reform, the schools) that has contributed to the extended death of Baltimore, and by extension all of America's inner cities. For the show's final go-round, the show takes on the decline of local media. Simon spent years -- several of them tumultuous -- at the Baltimore Sun before he started creating amazing TV shows. Naturally, Simon brings much of his personal disaffection and melancholy to his portrayal of that disintegrating daily.

Continue reading: The Wire: Season Five Review

The Wire: Season Four Review


Essential
By the end of season three of The Wire -- aka HBO's best excuse for staying on the air -- one could sense that the show had, in some sense of the word, come to an end. It was certainly clear for a time that HBO executives thought so, having come close to canceling the multifaceted, frighteningly addictive urban drama yet again, as it never pulled anywhere near the kind of ratings that their warhorses like The Sopranos and Sex and the City had. Although plenty of strings were left dangling at the conclusion of episode 37, "Mission Accomplished," a chapter had been definitively closed, with Avon Barksdale back in jail, and his brainy partner Stringer Belle gunned down. Since the two of them had been the impressive foils to the strung-out cops in the Baltimore Major Crimes Unit, their departure seemed to leave a vacuum. With nobody of real consequence running the West Baltimore drug trade (the Barksdales' chief rival and replacement, Marlo Stanfield, seems at first nothing more than some punk kid), what would be left that was worth watching?

More than enough, it turns out.

Continue reading: The Wire: Season Four Review

The Wire: Season Three Review


Essential

Sadly, the most passionate and persuasive argument in recent years against the current disposition of the government's stance in the so-called "War on Drugs" came not from a think tank armed with stats and big ideas or a celebrity eager for a cause, but from a TV show. The third season of The Wire, which aired on HBO in late 2004, continued its sprawling and justifiably lauded Dickensian crawl through its web of stories centering on the inner Baltimore drug trade -- following, with an unusual focus to detail and character, both the gangs fighting for territory and the cops of a major case unit assigned to busting up their organizations. But where the show became more than just an abnormally well-made, balanced, and realistic law and order drama (and there's no need here to heap more praise on the show than already has been done), and became something entirely different, was in the fourth episode, "Amsterdam."

Police major "Bunny" Colvin (previously a supporting player on the show), desperate to see some improvement in his crime-ridden West Baltimore district and tired of watching his cops waste all their time busting street corner dealers to no larger effect, institutes a new policy: If all drug dealers move to three designated zones in the district and sell there, they will not be arrested. In effect, he legalizes the drug trade in a large part of an American city. The cops don't get it, the drug-dealing kids don't either, as it throws into question the entire reality of their limited universe where the kids sell drugs, occasionally they get hassled or arrested, but everything goes on without change; as one of the dealers says, "Why you got to go and fuck with the program?"

The point being made here by the two creative forces behind The Wire -- investigative reporter David Simon and veteran detective Ed Burns, both of whom know this territory better than almost anyone -- is quite simple: the drug trade has atomized vast and forgotten swaths of American cities, like West Baltimore, and decades of simplistic, head-knocking, "tough on crime" enforcement has made zero difference. So, take a page out of Amsterdam's book, where a blind eye is turned to the drug traffic in certain designated areas, and see if you can at least make some poor neighborhoods normal again by ridding them of turf-battling drug gangs.

Colvin -- a strange kind of revolutionary -- gives a speech using the "brown paper bag" analogy Simon introduced in his book The Corner: Men drinking on the street will carry their liquor in a brown paper bag -- the cops know it's liquor but don't arrest them for public drinking because the men are at least making an attempt at hiding the bottle. It's the same with pushing drug dealing to what Colvin calls the "free zones"; it's a civil truce. Call it legalization, call it a truce, call it dealing with reality, Simon's point is that drugs will be dealt, and the more you can keep the trade itself from ruining the social fabric of already distressed neighborhoods, the better. And if you can weave this message into a thrilling hour-long crime drama, all the better.

As for what the remainder of this season dealt with, it would be futile to go into much discussion of that, since The Wire's storylines rival Tolstoy's in their complexity. Suffice it to say that one must watch the show as one reads a book, starting at the beginning of season three -- even with that "previously, on The Wire" intro which HBO prefaces its shows with -- is next to useless. For those who have already been watching, of primary importance is that the show's quality remains undimmed. Simon's writing staff has been beefed up by the addition of top-shelf novelists like Richard Price (Clockers) and George Pelecanos (The Night Gardener), who bring some welcome flourishes of both character-driven realism and pulp crime drama to the proceedings. A few of the show's more central characters get their arcs reversed, with the classically rogueish cop McNulty (a wonderfully snarky Dominic West) coming to a crisis of self-destruction, and striving criminal mastermind Stringer Bell (the iconic and contemplative Idris Elba) finding himself stuck between worlds, too street for the business world and too thoughtful for the street. And although several long-running characters continue to pop up -- like free-range gunslingers Omar (Michael K. Williams) and Brother Mouzone (Michael Potts), and Bubbles (Andre Royo), the junkie who serves as the closest thing The Wire has to a chorus -- story is always sublimated to the overarching themes, with the focus never straying far from Simon's central conceit of the American city in crisis, and what to do about it.

The Wire has cast a sardonic eye on the efficacy of current drug law enforcement since the beginning. In the very first episode, a detective who just used the term "War on Drugs" gets a quick schooling from another detective on why the term just doesn't apply, with the world-wearied quip, "Wars end." By presenting an idea for how one might, if not win a war that has done so much damage to American cities and the economically disadvantaged, then at least call an honorable truce, the show became not just the best show currently on television, but also possibly the most important.

Anyone else see Charlie Brown's shirt?

The Low Down Review


Weak
I like the slacker mentality, really I do. Nights of parties, days of sleeping them off, not a care in the world. The sad thing is that, with rare exception (namely Slacker), movies about the slacker mentality come off as if they too were made without a care in the world.

The Low Down is Exhibit A when it comes to this offense. Lazy, meandering, mopey, and flat, this is a cheap-looking film obsessed with showing off a hip image it doesn't actually have.

Continue reading: The Low Down Review

Aidan Gillen

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Aidan Gillen

Date of birth

24th April, 1968

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.78


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Aidan Gillen Movies

Maze Runner: The Death Cure Trailer

Maze Runner: The Death Cure Trailer

Thomas (Dylan O'Brien) and his fellow Gladers have fought their way out of a Griever-infested...

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Movie Review

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Movie Review

It's unlikely that Guy Ritchie could make a boring movie if he wanted to. This...

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King Arthur Trailer

King Arthur Trailer

Arthur grew up as a peasant on the streets of Londonium having escaped the terror...

The Lovers Trailer

The Lovers Trailer

Mary (Debra Winger) and Michael (Tracy Letts) have been married for a long time and,...

King Arthur Legend of the Sword Trailer

King Arthur Legend of the Sword Trailer

Arthur might have an extraordinary destiny, but after his birthright was taken from him at...

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