Adrian Lester

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Adrian Lester - South Bank Sky Arts Awards held at the Savoy, arrivals. at South Bank - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 7th June 2015

Adrian Lester

Helen Mirren's 'The Audience' Queen Performance Wins Standard Award


Helen Mirren Damian Lewis Rory Kinnear Adrian Lester David Walliams

Dame Helen Mirren has once again been lauded for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II, this time for her turn in West End production, The Audience. The 68 year-old star was named best actress at the 59th London Evening Standard Theatre Awards at the weekend's awards ceremony.

Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren Is The London Evening Standard's Best Actress.

However, Mirren was reluctant to hog all the praise to herself, telling reporters that she felt that the Queen was also deserving. "I did feel very much that the response to the play was as much a response to that person, that extraordinary woman, as it was to my performance," she said, via BBC News.

Continue reading: Helen Mirren's 'The Audience' Queen Performance Wins Standard Award

Adrian Lester & Lolita Chakrabarti - Whatsonstage.com Awards at Palace Theatre - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 17th February 2013

Adrian Lester and Lolita

Adrian Lester - Sunday 5th December 2010 at Old Billingsgate The British Independent Film Awards held at the Old Billingsgate Market - Arrivals. London, England

Adrian Lester

Case 39 Review


Good
The truth is this: you can never have too many evil child thrillers, especially when they star Oscar-winning actresses. This ramshackle movie features a preposterous plot, dodgy direction and clunky editing, and yet it's great fun to watch the actors squirm with fear.

Emily (Zellweger) is a social worker barely keeping up with 38 cases when her boss (Lester) hands her one more. It centres on 10-year-old Lily (Ferland), whose parents (Rennie and O'Malley) might be abusing her. Surely when they lock her in an oven and switch on the heat, something is wrong. Emily rescues Lily and takes her in, turning to two friends for help: a child counsellor (Cooper) and a cop (McShane). The cop is important because something is clearly not right with Lily.

Continue reading: Case 39 Review

Adrian Lester - Adrian Lester and guest London, England - Women In Film And TV Awards held at the London Hilton, Park Lane. Friday 4th December 2009

Adrian Lester

Adrian Lester - Adrian Lester, Sunday 26th April 2009 at British Academy Television Awards London, England

Adrian Lester

Dust (2001) Review


Bad
Here's a uniquely bad movie that combines not one unwatchable story, but two!

It begins when a punk kid breaks into an old woman's house. The old lady overpowers him, and forces him to listen to a story. She even ends up in a hospital, and the kid follows her there to keep hearing this damn story.

Continue reading: Dust (2001) Review

Doomsday Review


Bad
Step aside, zombie films -- there's a new derivative genre in town. The post-apocalyptic thriller is out to trump your ongoing redundancy. Instead of bringing something new to the dystopian brave new world, writer/director Neil Marshall's Doomsday has simply decided to reference each and every offering in the oeuvre. A substantial slip from his championed efforts (Dog Soldiers and The Descent), this Escape from Newcastle calamity is like watching George Miller channel John Carpenter. Toss in a little Aliens, a few medieval riffs, and enough Mad Max references to choke Mel Gibson's ego and you've got a disaster pretending to be profound.

When the Reaper virus devastates Glasgow, the British government quarantines all of Scotland. A few survivors make it out. The rest are locked behind heavy steel walls and guarded gates. Nearly three decades later, the plague reappears, this time in downtown London. Desperate to find a cure, Cabinet Minister Caranis (David O'Hara) gets Police Chief Nelson (Bob Hoskins) to send his top officer back into the hot zone. He chooses lady loose cannon Eden Sinclair (Rhona Mitra). Her goal? Lead a group of soldiers to Kane (Malcolm McDowell), a doctor who was once in charge of Reaper research. Seems the satellites have been picking up images of humans in the supposedly uninhabitable realm, and if Kane has found a cure, they may be able to stop the insidious disease.

Continue reading: Doomsday Review

Starting Out In The Evening Review


Extraordinary
Hollywood exaggerates the truth about many professions, but might be dead-on with its frequent depiction of novelists as tortured and frustrated human beings. After all, few careers share the morale-crushing nature of a novelist; even well-known writers can spend years on a book only to receive rejection and never see it published. Then there's deadline pressure. Leonard Schiller's deadline isn't from an agent or publisher, but rather pending death.

Starting Out in the Evening unveils the final chapter in the life of Schiller (Frank Langella), an aging novelist whose health deteriorates as he races to complete one last book. Since his existing novels are out of print, Leonard needs the next one be a success if he wants to be fondly remembered in the literary world. He's been working on the book for over a decade now, however, and has failed to capture interest from publishers. His shortcomings are not due to laziness, though. Leonard used to be a more prolific writer, but has never been the same since his wife died years prior, and neither has his work.

Continue reading: Starting Out In The Evening Review

Love's Labour's Lost Review


Good
Film musicals are a tough sell these days. It's either the annual Disney animation vehicle or it's Edward Norton dancing to swing music. I could probably count the last five years worth of decent musicals on my left hand. The juxtaposition of dialogue with song and dance always seems to remind me of the tragedies of my high school drama days. Those damn tights. The bad pancake makeup.

Kenneth Branagh's latest Shakespearean opus, Love's Labour's Lost, falls into the category of an ingenious experiment gone horrible wrong. Like a bartender with one too many vodka-tonics on his breath, Branagh mixes one of Shakespeare's lesser-known comedies with the music of Cole Porter and Irving Berlin and places everything in 1939 France. Think the Rat Pack in some bad 1960s film.

Continue reading: Love's Labour's Lost Review

Maybe Baby Review


Good
Infertility movies have been made before with middling success (Forget Paris), and this all-Brit redux also has its moments of levity and moments of melodramatic nonsense. Packed full of A- and B-list celebs, including just about anyone from the UK who's ever been in a movie. Amusing but not terribly filling (no pun intended). based on the novel Inconceivable (presumably, pun intended).

Born Romantic Review


Good
Kooky, nutty, cheesy... David Kane's Born Romantic is all over the romantic map as it tries to weave together three, four, or more Brit-love stories. Some are hit and miss, and the women in the movie (Jane Horrocks, Catherine McCormack, Olivia Williams) generally run rings around the blokes (in terms of acting ability, anyway). Altogether the movie never really gels, coming together like a cross between episodes of Coupling and Benny Hill.

Dust Review


Bad
Here's a uniquely bad movie that combines not one unwatchable story, but two!

It begins when a punk kid breaks into an old woman's house. The old lady overpowers him, and forces him to listen to a story. She even ends up in a hospital, and the kid follows her there to keep hearing this damn story.

Continue reading: Dust Review

Love's Labour's Lost Review


Good

For a long time I've had a theory that the musical genre couldn't survive the cynicism of modern audiences except as a ironic in-joke, like the "South Park" movie or as a post-modern homage, like Woody Allen's "Everyone Says I Love You."

I couldn't have been more wrong -- and leave it to Kenneth Branagh, a writer-director-actor who has made his name revitalizing old (old, old!) school entertainment -- to prove it by bringing back the kind of weightless musical delight that carried Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers to stardom.

For his new adaptation of Shakespeare's "Love's Labour's Lost," Branagh has re-imagined the buoyant romantic comedy as a classy, corny, 1930s movie musical, complete with uplifting dance numbers and a catalog of favorite big band ditties sung with great enthusiasm (if not great skill) by a quality cast of cheerful actors clearly having the time of their lives.

Continue reading: Love's Labour's Lost Review

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David Bowie Wins Big, But Grime Artists Go Home Empty-Handed At The 2017 BRIT Awards

David Bowie Wins Big, But Grime Artists Go Home Empty-Handed At The 2017 BRIT Awards

David Bowie and Rag'n'Bone Man both won two awards at the 2017 BRIT Awards at the O2 Arena in London last night.

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Skepta To Headline Wireless Festival 2017 With Chance The Rapper And The Weeknd

Skepta To Headline Wireless Festival 2017 With Chance The Rapper And The Weeknd

The grime superstar will top the bill on Saturday night at Finsbury Park's Wireless Festival in July, with The Weeknd and Chance The Rapper also...

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Adrian Lester Movies

Case 39 Movie Review

Case 39 Movie Review

The truth is this: you can never have too many evil child thrillers, especially when...

Case 39 Trailer

Case 39 Trailer

Watch the trailer for Case 39Emily Jenkins is a family social worker, at times her...

Doomsday Movie Review

Doomsday Movie Review

Step aside, zombie films -- there's a new derivative genre in town. The post-apocalyptic thriller...

Starting Out in the Evening Movie Review

Starting Out in the Evening Movie Review

Hollywood exaggerates the truth about many professions, but might be dead-on with its frequent depiction...

Scenes Of A Sexual Nature, Trailer Trailer

Scenes Of A Sexual Nature, Trailer Trailer

Scenes Of A Sexual Nature Trailer First time British director Ed Blum presents Scenes of...

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Love's Labour's Lost Movie Review

Love's Labour's Lost Movie Review

Film musicals are a tough sell these days. It's either the annual Disney animation...

Primary Colors Movie Review

Primary Colors Movie Review

A more timely film would be difficult to imagine. Mike Nichols' highly anticipated -- and...

Love's Labour's Lost Movie Review

Love's Labour's Lost Movie Review

For a long time I've had a theory that the musical genre couldn't survive the...

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