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Jennifer Lawrence To Play Elizabeth Holmes In New Adam McKay Movie


Jennifer Lawrence Adam McKay

Jennifer Lawrence has reportedly signed up to play Elizabeth Holmes in Adam McKay’s drama about medical company Theranos, according to Deadline. McKay’s last film was financial drama The Big Short, which earned him an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay and a nomination for Best Director.

Jennifer LawrenceJennifer Lawrence has reportedly signed on to play Elizabeth Holmes.

Holmes, 32 founded blood-testing startup Theranos in 2003, which as recently as two years ago was valued at $9 billion. The company claimed to have revolutionised blood testing by being able to use only a pinprick of blood, rather than traditional methods of drawing blood by injection.

Continue reading: Jennifer Lawrence To Play Elizabeth Holmes In New Adam McKay Movie

The Boss Review

Bad

Melissa McCarthy brings another of her improvisational alter-egos to the big screen with this energetic comedy. The first cause for pause comes because this is a reteaming with her filmmaker husband Ben Falcone, with whom she made the bizarrely unfunny Tammy, as opposed to the filmmaker Paul Feig who directed her to box office triumph with Spy and The Heat and an Oscar nomination in Bridesmaids. Yes, there's a significance difference.

This time she plays hugely popular financial guru Michelle Darnell, whose stardom ends abruptly when she is sent to prison for four months for insider trading. When she's released, everyone she stepped on as she rose to the top turns their back on her, and her nemesis/ex Renault (Peter Dinklage) is still determined to get revenge. The only person who will talk to her is former assistant Claire (Kristen Bell), so Michelle moves in with her family. Unable to restart her business, she also takes over the Dandelion Scout troup of Claire's daughter Rachel (Ella Anderson), pushing the girls to take aggressive measures to sell their cookies.

As always, McCarthy throws herself into the role, creating a vivid character who indulges in a lot of outrageously silly slapstick. As with Tammy, the humour centres more on abusive interaction and humiliation than actual wit. McCarthy and Falcone strain to get laughs from physical wackiness rather than anything based on the character, so the movie only ever feels mildly amusing thanks to its high energy. But there's nothing engaging about Michelle, and it's only in a few cute-warm scenes with the terrific Bell that the film springs to anything resembling life. Thankfully, her scenes with the likeable Tyler Labine (as a potential boyfriend) have a loose humour to them. And Dinklage is surprisingly amusing as the sputtering cartoonish villain, while Kathy Bates generates a few sparks as Michelle's sassy mentor.

Continue reading: The Boss Review

Adam McKay , Shira Piven - 88th Annual Academy (Oscars) Awards held at Hollywood & Highland Center - Arrivals at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, Oscars - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 28th February 2016

Adam Mckay and Shira Piven
Adam Mckay and Shira Piven
Adam Mckay

Angela Bassett, Adam McKay , Charles Randolph - EE British Academy Film Awards (BAFTA) Awards Winners Room 2016 at British Academy Film Awards - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 14th February 2016

Angela Bassett, Adam Mckay and Charles Randolph
Angela Bassett
Angela Bassett
Angela Bassett
Angela Bassett
Angela Bassett

Adam McKay - EE British Academy Film Awards 2016 (BAFTAs) held at the Royal Opera House - Arrivals at British Academy Film Awards - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 14th February 2016

Adam Mckay

Charles Randolph , Adam McKay - 2016 Writers Guild Awards at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Arrivals at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza, Writers Guild Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 13th February 2016

Charles Randolph and Adam Mckay
Charles Randolph and Adam Mckay
Charles Randolph
Charles Randolph
Charles Randolph and Adam Mckay
Charles Randolph and Adam Mckay

Adam McKay - 68th Annual Directors Guild Of America Awards at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Century City, California, United States - Saturday 6th February 2016

Adam Mckay
Adam Mckay and Shira Piven
Adam Mckay
Adam Mckay

The Big Short Review

Excellent

Smart and snappy, this comedy is one of the scariest films of the year, using humour to outline the 2008 economic collapse from the inside. With characters who are based on real people, the film shows how economists made a fortune from the financial devastation inflicted on millions of families. And the movie cleverly points out that all of this happened (and people are still getting away with it) because the general public can't be bothered to pay attention.

Things were so booming in the first years of this century that it was easy for the media to divert the attention of Americans away from the dark underbelly of the financial world, creating big scandals out of nothing, spurring rampant buying sprees and making stars of non-entities like the Kardashians. Meanwhile in 2005, investment expert Michael Burry (Christian Bale) noticed that America's mortgage market was turning toxic. So he offered to "short" it, betting against this always-stable market by purchasing credit default swaps. The banks thought they would make a fortune from him, carrying on their dangerous practices. But other experts saw Burry's point, including the nerdy genius Mark Baum (Steve Carell), the shark-like Jared Vennett (Ryan Gosling) and a pair of newbies (Finn Wittrock and John Magaro) who tip off their reclusive mentor Ben Rickert (Brad Pitt). When the economy imploded, these men became billionaires.

Director-cowriter Adam McKay is better known for silly movies like Anchorman, so he packs this film with raucous cutaways to pop culture references of the period, as well as hilariously absurd explanations of economic issues from, for example, Margot Robbie in a bubble bath or Selena Gomez playing blackjack. This approach actually heightens the horror of what's going on as fraudulent bankers and corrupt government officials conspire to undermine the foundations of the economy. Although the explanations still feel like gibberish to mere mortals, it's at least presented in a way that's entertaining.

Continue reading: The Big Short Review

Ryan Gosling On The 'Cautionary Tale' Of 'The Big Short'


Ryan Gosling Adam McKay Brad Pitt

In The Big Short Ryan Gosling plays a bank trader who along with a few like-minded individuals, helps predict the financial collapse and the housing market crisis by betting against the big banks. While the film blends both comedy and drama, the actor describes it as a ‘cautionary tale,’ that carries a moral message for all.

Ryan GoslingRyan Gosling stars in The Big Short.

“What makes the film special is that although its characters are walking a moral tightrope the film never really is, because the film never celebrates the score that the characters pull of in the end,” Gosling said. For the filmmakers the difficulty lay in finding the balance between telling the story in an entertaining way, but also being careful not to celebrate the end result.

Continue reading: Ryan Gosling On The 'Cautionary Tale' Of 'The Big Short'

Daddy's Home Review

Good

An odd mix of sentimental family warmth and gross-out antics, this comedy doesn't have the courage of its own convictions, which means that it's not quite funny enough to keep the audience fully entertained. That said, there are just about enough laughs that hit the target, and the big-hearted humour is surprisingly endearing, with larger themes that resonate even when the filmmakers get bogged down in the strained rude jokes.

Will Ferrell plays Brad, a guy who can't have kids but has always wanted to be a dad. So when he marries Sarah (Linda Cardellini), he enthusiastically dives into the stepdad role with her children (Owen Vaccaro and Scarlett Estevez). Then just as they're finally warming to him, their biological father Dusty (Mark Walhberg) turns up, clearly determined to win his family back. What follows is a battle between a too-nice dork and a super-cool biker, competing for the affections of both Sarah and the kids. Brad gets some terrible advice from his boss (Thomas Haden Church), while Dusty recruits a handyman (Hannibal Buress) to back his side.

There's plenty of potential in this premise, but the filmmakers refuse to make the decision about who the film is aimed at. It's too vulgar to be family entertainment, but it's not edgy enough to properly appeal to adults. So it sits there genially, occasionally sparking a burst of laughter or a knowing smile. But the plot never makes any sense, mainly because to make it work the filmmakers portray Brad as a complete and utter loser until the moment the movie needs him to be the good guy. All of which is painfully predictable, complete with shamelessly sappy moralising. Thankfully, the cast can play these kinds of characters effortlessly, and both Ferrell and Walhberg add details that keep the audience engaged.

Continue reading: Daddy's Home Review

The Big Short Trailer


When Dr. Michael Burry discovered that the housing market in the US relied upon a series of bad loans in 2005, he knew there was profit to be had. He even went as far as moving on from his multi-million dollar Scion Capital LLC hedge fund in a bid to short the market and take advantage of the vulnerable housing deals. But he wasn't the only one with plans to accrue wealth off the back of financial disaster; Steve Eisman was a hedge fund manager who had a lot to say against the greedy banks, as did Cornwall Capital partner Ben Hockett and Deutsche Bank trader Greg Lippmann. These are financial outsiders that are about to show the banks a serious lesson when they use their economic skills to bring them down with a brave move in the credit default swap market.

Continue: The Big Short Trailer

Ant-Man Review

Excellent

The increasingly stale Marvel formula gets a blast of fresh air in this rollocking adventure movie, which combines a steady stream of character-based comedy with action sequences that are integrated seamlessly into the plot. Like last summer's Guardians of the Galaxy, the film departs from the usual tired structure to joyously tell a story that's more than pure escapism.

Released from prison after a stint for burglary, Scott (Paul Rudd) is struggling to restart his life when he has an unexpected encounter with Hank Pym (Michael Douglas), an inventor who needs his help. Hank's technology company is being steered away from his original vision to help mankind by his daughter Hope (Evangeline Lilly) and his protege Darren (Corey Stoll), who see a chance to make a lot of money by selling Hank's ideas to the highest bidder. Hank's biggest breakthrough is a suit that shrinks the wearer down to ant-size, allowing for all kinds of unexpected possibilities. Pushed into a corner, Scott starts learning how to master the suit. But his ex-wife (Judy Greer) is now engaged to a cop (Bobby Cannavale) who's keeping his eye on Scott.

One of director Peyton Reed's main challenges was to sell the whole idea of an insect-sized warrior, and he does that fairly effortlessly, revealing an increasingly cool series of possibilities in each action sequence. These set-pieces emerge organically from the story, combining comedy and exhilaratingly coherent action to push the narrative forward. One of the best moments is an encounter with one of the Avengers (Anthony Mackie's Falcon), which offers a strong hint about how Ant-Man can liven up the franchise as a whole. And the climactic sequence is an inspired collision of mind-bending effects and inventive humorous touches (Thomas the Tank Engine nearly steals the whole film). Plus two post-credit stings for the fanboys.

Continue reading: Ant-Man Review

Ryan Gosling In Talks For 'Blade Runner' Sequel


Blade Runner Harrison Ford Ryan Gosling Ridley Scott Michael Green Russell Crowe Christian Bale Adam McKay Brad Pitt

Ryan Gosling is in talks to star in the sequel to Blade Runner. The 34-year-old actor will be joined by Harrison Ford, who played Rick Deckard in the original 1982 film. Ford will reprise his role but it is uncertain which part Gosling, if negotiations are successful, will play.

Ryan GoslingRyan Gosling is in talks to appear in Blade Runner 2.

Read More: Harrison Ford to Return for Blade Runner 2, Denis Villeneuve to Direct.

Continue reading: Ryan Gosling In Talks For 'Blade Runner' Sequel

Get Hard Review


Good

Audiences may be divided over whether this comedy crosses the line as it looks for laughs in racism and homophobia, but the cast and crew just manage to keep the movie's heart in the right place. At its core, this is another enjoyable bromance that uses cheap gags to keep the audience chuckling awkwardly. And even if the one joke requires a certain level of gay fear, the film has enough spark and personality to poke fun at what is clearly depicted as narrow-minded paranoia.

It opens in a ludicrously expansive Bel Air mansion, where naive investor James (Will Ferrell) lives with his shark-like fiancee Alissa (Alison Brie), daughter of his boss Martin (Craig T. Nelson). Then as he's performing a duet with John Mayer at his engagement party, the feds swoop in and arrest James for embezzlement. But his innocent plea is ignored, and the judge throws the book at him, sentencing him to 10 years at the notorious San Quentin Penitentiary. With 30 days before he has to report to jail, James hires his car valet Darnell (Kevin Hart) to toughen him up for life behind bars, assuming that because he's black Darnell must surely know something about prison life. Darnell needs the cash, so he plays along, turning to his gang-member cousin Russell (Tip "T.I." Harris) for some street cred.

The script adds some clever texture in Darnell's home life with his no-nonsense wife (Dickerson), who is bemused by the fact that her nice-guy husband is pretending to be a seasoned criminal. Like her, the audience is waiting for the sham to collapse hilariously around him, but the screenplay veers off in some unexpected directions that both increase the tension and push the humour closer to the edge. Even so, the movie's core issue is the gaping divide between obscene Westside wealth and the relative economic struggle in South Central. Although director Etan Cohen never takes any of this too seriously, milking every situation for maximum absurdity.

Continue reading: Get Hard Review

Tammy Review


Weak

Melissa McCarthy is clearly in a rut: the title character in this film isn't very far removed from her previous roles in The Heat and Identity Thief. Yes, Tammy is another chubby slob who is on the road to some sort of epiphany, and along the way she realises that simply running a comb through her ratty hair might make her look more human. At least the film has a seriously strong supporting cast who almost make it worth a look.

Tammy (McCarthy) is sacked from her job at a fast-food outlet on the same day she discovers that her husband (Faxon) is having a fling with a neighbour (Tony Collette). In a childish rage, she runs home to her parents (Allison Janney and Dan Aykroyd) and then decides to keep running, taking her grandmother Pearl (Sarandon) along for the ride. Pearl has a dream to see Niagara Falls before she dies, but she's just about as immature as Tammy is, so they immediately start getting into trouble. Their antics include a series of incidents involving a jet-ski, flirting and more with a father and son (Gary Cole and Mark Duplass), robbing a burger joint and attending a raucous 4th of July party at the home of Pearl's wealthy cousin (Kathy Bates).

Tammy is even less worldly wise than McCarthy's previous variations on the character: she has never even attempted to grow up, so reacts to everything like a toddler. Aside from not being remotely funny, this is deeply annoying from the start. And even the characters around her don't laugh - they roll their eyes in exasperation. Then after establishing her as a relentless loser who brings misfortune on herself, the script (written by McCarthy and her real-life husband Ben Falcone, who also directs and appears as Tammy's boss) contrives to make Tammy sympathetic by portraying her as some sort of a victim. Meanwhile, she of course slowly begins to look less cartoonish simply because she changes her shirt and takes a shower along the way.

Continue reading: Tammy Review

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Adam McKay Movies

The Boss Movie Review

The Boss Movie Review

Melissa McCarthy brings another of her improvisational alter-egos to the big screen with this energetic...

The Big Short Movie Review

The Big Short Movie Review

Smart and snappy, this comedy is one of the scariest films of the year, using...

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Daddy's Home Movie Review

Daddy's Home Movie Review

An odd mix of sentimental family warmth and gross-out antics, this comedy doesn't have the...

The Big Short Trailer

The Big Short Trailer

When Dr. Michael Burry discovered that the housing market in the US relied upon a...

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Ant-Man Movie Review

Ant-Man Movie Review

The increasingly stale Marvel formula gets a blast of fresh air in this rollocking adventure...

Get Hard Movie Review

Get Hard Movie Review

Audiences may be divided over whether this comedy crosses the line as it looks for...

Tammy Movie Review

Tammy Movie Review

Melissa McCarthy is clearly in a rut: the title character in this film isn't very...

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues Movie Review

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues Movie Review

It's been nearly 10 years since we first met Ron Burgundy, and this sequel is...

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues Trailer

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues Trailer

The legend of San Diego's Channel 4 news team may have long since dissolved over...

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues - International Trailer Trailer

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues - International Trailer Trailer

The news used to be a noble profession before the likes of Ron Burgundy with...

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues - Horsepower Clip Trailer

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues - Horsepower Clip Trailer

Ron Burgundy compares a Dodge Durango's horsepower to that of an actually horse before insulting...

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