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Adam Goldberg Tuesday 9th October 2007 New York Premiere of 'We Own The Night' at Chelsea West Cinemas - Arrivals New York City, USA

Adam Goldberg
Adam Goldberg
Adam Goldberg
Adam Goldberg

Man About Town Review


Good
Yeah, that's Ben Affleck grinning out at you from the cover of this direct-to-DVD release, but don't let that turn you off of the film completely. Man About Town may be rehashed from Jerry Maguire and

Dazed And Confused Review


Extraordinary
This film started a number of careers, and it's definitely a classic and a high moment in the career of director Richard Linklater (also known for Slacker, the disappointing Before Sunrise, and the new Waking Life).

It is an entertaining fictionalization of high school graduation weekend of the senior class of 1976 in Linklater's former home city of Austin, Texas. Jocks, rednecks, cheerleaders, stoners, frosh, and the other high school demographic groups are all lovingly and respectfully rendered on Linklater's canvas. Though I didn't graduate until the mid-'80s, I'm pretty sure that the amount of pot smoking is this film is not exaggerated. And as evidence of the director's commitment to brutal realism, Foghat's "Slow Ride" is heard not once, not twice, but three times before the end of the movie. Rock on.

Continue reading: Dazed And Confused Review

Déjà Vu Review


Very Good
The last time I could use "smart" to describe a Tony Scott movie, a bath-robed Will Smith was dodging satellites and thwarting conspirators in the taut Enemy of the State. The ready-made blockbuster pushed the envelope of technological surveillance as it spun a textured man-on-the-run mystery. Having Smith, Gene Hackman, and Jon Voight on hand certainly helped.

Scott resumes his techno tricks for Déjà Vu, a police procedural with science-fiction tools that improves longstanding stakeout methods as an investigator works to solve a volatile crime.

Continue reading: Déjà Vu Review

Stay Alive Review


Bad
It's a horror plot so surefire that you wonder why it hasn't been done before: Young people play a mysterious new videogame and start to die, one by one, in grisly scenes mimicking their game deaths. Stay Alive runs through this plot with such a plodding lack of imagination that you think again: Maybe this has been done before, on The X-Files or a direct-to-video picture you missed. Surely a movie this tired can't be the first crack at a fundamentally decent genre idea?

Stay Alive gets around this conundrum easily by knocking off The Ring and throwing in a little of the Final Destination series: the former's ghostly gimmick mixed with the latter's view of life as an elaborate series of macabre booby traps. Unfortunately, even the cut-and-paste is botched; no Ring-style tension builds, and the PG-13 rating curtails the death scenes, most of which all but cut away before the character's gory fate is sealed. Yes, you read that right: Stay Alive is like a Final Destination movie without the death scenes.

Continue reading: Stay Alive Review

I Love Your Work Review


OK
I may not love your work but I don't think much of your mind, either. The mind, that is, of the guy responsible for this cult psychodrama on steroids, writer-director Adam Goldberg.

His Gray Evans (Giovanni Ribisi) is a movie star who can't go far without being recognized and adulated, but he's being led down the path of depression by psychotic paranoia spiked with narcissism. He's married to his boyhood idol, Mia (Franka Potente), who truly loves him, but she's more the inspiration for distrust than love and joy. Self-destruction lurks in the wings.

Continue reading: I Love Your Work Review

The Hebrew Hammer Review


OK
It's the curse of the great-pitch movie: They can never live up to the premise. And the funny but sloppy The Hebrew Hammer has a premise to kill for. Mordechai Jefferson Carver (Adam Goldberg) is the hero of the title, a badass Orthodox Jew who makes a slight living as a private eye (his door reads "Certified Circumcised Dick") and prowls the streets of Gotham, striking fear into the hearts of anti-Semites and admonishing the kids to "stay Jewish." He rolls like Superfly in an extra-long Cadillac, fully pimped-out, but always observes the Sabbath and loves his mother, of course.

Every superhero needs a supervillain, of course, and this film's answer to that maxim is Andy Dick. Apparently psychotic from birth, Dick plays Damian, the racist son of Santa who kills his more tolerant father and sets about turning the North Pole into a sweatshop, banishing the non-Aryan elves and concocting a diabolical plan to destroy Hanukkah. Not surprisingly, this causes the Jewish Justice League (who hold court in a massive, Star of David-shaped building) no small amount of consternation, and they start casting about for a Jewish hero to fight Damian. Quickly discarding suggestions of Steven Spielberg and Yitzhak Perlman, they reluctantly settle on the Hammer, whom they'd drummed out of the organization long before.

Continue reading: The Hebrew Hammer Review

All Over The Guy Review


Excellent
All Over the Guy doesn't tackle the issue of homosexuality, it simply accepts that its characters are gay. And it's refreshing to see homosexual relationships and straight relationships treated equally. This isn't another one of those annoying gay rights movies -- it just wants to have fun.

Screenwriter Dan Bucantinsky -- who also stars in and produced the film -- has a lot of fun with his script. The ingenious dialogue occurs in quick, humorous spurts. The characters speak in a witty, candid, spontaneous style as the dialogue cleverly directs the story in unexpected ways. With amusing references to In & Out, Gone With the Wind, martinis, sex, and family history, it's difficult not to like the film's many quirks. How can you dislike a movie that has so much fun with the "fuzzy wuzzy was a bear...." rhyme?

Continue reading: All Over The Guy Review

The Salton Sea Review


Excellent
The imagery of The Salton Sea surpasses standard noir. It's a tale of a desolate man lost in an abyss of emotional turmoil, desperately seeking redemption and revenge against unknown assailants. The film's opening shot of Val Kilmer, sitting on a barren floor surrounded by flames as he pours Miles Davis through his trumpet, delivers both the physical heat of the flames and the fiery, emotional pain of loss locked within his eyes. It's a haunting and eerily tragic moment of humanity displayed at its weakest point of existence.

The story of The Salton Sea is constructed as an updated version of a 1940s noir film. Expertly written by Tony Gayton, the film opens up with a brief history of speed, a crash course complete with 1950s housewives and Japanese kamikaze pilots. Then, the camera quickly navigates through a crazed house party and lands next to a heavily tattooed Kilmer, sitting amongst speed freaks on a four-day binge. Or maybe it's been three days. With a strong voiceover delivered by Kilmer, we learn about the double life he leads. One life is an addict and police informant known as Danny Parker, complete with numerous tats, leather pants, and skull rings on every finger. And another one, locked in his closet, is a trumpeter named Tom Van Allen, whose wife ended up dead years ago at the hands of masked men during a rest stop robbery while vacationing at the Salton Sea.

Continue reading: The Salton Sea Review

Scotch And Milk Review


Good
Actor Adam Goldberg's directorial debut is a predictably rough piece of work, with brooding black and white cinematography, odd rear-projection tricks, and a considerably stilted narration (and of course he's pining for a girl...), but he redeems muich of his overenthusiasm with a cool jazz soundtrack and a swingin' undertone that puts you in a timeless era that successfully evokes the 1950s. Co-starring virtually everyone from Boiler Room, Scotch and Milk makes good with raw talent and a certain flair, but don't go looking for a whole lot more.

How To Lose A Guy In 10 Days Review


Bad
Here's a little something to think about, should you find your unfortunate, misguided, sorry ass dragged to see this utter waste of a movie. Who's more masculine-looking: Matthew McConaughey, with his Goldilocks looks and enormous pecs, or Kate Hudson, with her creepy, angular features and ironed-straight Guns N' Roses hairdo?

This spurious conjecture is sadly far more interesting than How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, a film which effectively loses its audience inside of 10 minutes.

Continue reading: How To Lose A Guy In 10 Days Review

Dazed And Confused Review


Extraordinary
This film started a number of careers, and it's definitely a classic and a high moment in the career of director Richard Linklater (also known for Slacker, the disappointing Before Sunrise, and the new Waking Life).

Continue reading: Dazed And Confused Review

The Salton Sea Review


OK

A handsomely stylish, semi-punk, drug-culture updating of the wronged-man's-revenge film noir plot, "The Salton Sea" has one of the most enticingly, quintessentially film noir opening scenes I've ever seen.

Picture this: Val Kilmer, dressed as a hep cat who just finished a gig at a downtown jazz club, sits on the floor of his burning apartment. Leaning on a wall, silhouetted against the orange flames, he's playing his trumpet and bleeding -- possibly to death -- from a gunshot wound. A bag full of money lies beside him with wads of bills spilling out onto the floor beside him.

"My name is Tom Van Allen. Or Danny Parker. I honestly don't know any more," he breathes in a honeyed, genre-perfect voice-over. "You can decide -- yeah, maybe you can help me, friend. You can help me decide who I am. Avenging Angel? Judas Iscariot? Loving husband? Trumpet player? Speed freak?"

Continue reading: The Salton Sea Review

A Beautiful Mind Review


Good

It might be hard to imagine a mathematician as an exciting movie hero -- even a brilliant, mentally unstable mathematician. What's a director going to do with that? A dramatic zoom on the guy's calculator?

Yet Ron Howard's "A Beautiful Mind" is the fifth film in as many years focused on an off-kilter arithmetic genius -- and each one of them has been mesmerizing in its own way.

Fictionalized without seeming contrived, this biography of Princeton professor and Nobel Prize winner John Forbes Nash, Jr. is the story of a determined man overcoming madness on his own terms. It is a "let's make an Oscar movie" movie. It doesn't have "Good Will Hunting's" street-smart charm or "Pi's" jarring, visceral depiction of delusion. It's not intricately intellectual like "Conceiving Ada" (about Ada Byron King, great-grandmother of the modern computer) or deeply moving like "Infinity" (about Los Alamos bomb-designer Richard Feynman and his tuberculosis-afflicted wife).

Continue reading: A Beautiful Mind Review

How To Lose A Guy In 10 Days Review


Zero

A curious thing happened after the press screening of "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days" -- I talked to several young women from the audience who described the movie as "cute" and "fun." But every single guy I spoke with had the same reaction I did: They thought this so-called romantic comedy was nothing short of absolute torture.

Could Hollywood have inadvertently stumbled upon the definitive, gender-dividing, no-middle-ground chick flick?

There's no question that the picture's target audience is female. Its heroine is a sparky columnist for a Cosmo-like magazine (played by Kate Hudson) who accepts an assignment to catch herself some handsome rube, then deliberately drive him away within 10 days by committing "all the classic dating mistakes."

Continue reading: How To Lose A Guy In 10 Days Review

Adam Goldberg

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Adam Goldberg Movies

Entourage: Season Three, Part Two Movie Review

Entourage: Season Three, Part Two Movie Review

It's next to impossible to discuss the HBO series Entourage without comparing it to the...

Déjà Vu Movie Review

Déjà Vu Movie Review

The last time I could use "smart" to describe a Tony Scott movie, a bath-robed...

Stay Alive Movie Review

Stay Alive Movie Review

It's a horror plot so surefire that you wonder why it hasn't been done before:...

I Love Your Work Movie Review

I Love Your Work Movie Review

I may not love your work but I don't think much of your mind, either....

The Hebrew Hammer Movie Review

The Hebrew Hammer Movie Review

It's the curse of the great-pitch movie: They can never live up to the premise....

All Over The Guy Movie Review

All Over The Guy Movie Review

All Over the Guy doesn't tackle the issue of homosexuality, it simply accepts that its...

The Salton Sea Movie Review

The Salton Sea Movie Review

The imagery of The Salton Sea surpasses standard noir. It's a tale of a...

A Beautiful Mind Movie Review

A Beautiful Mind Movie Review

I hate math. I've always hated math. It gives me a pounding headache. It would...

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