Adam Garcia

Adam Garcia

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Adam Garcia - Gala performance of Matthew Bourne's 'Sleeping Beauty' at Sadler's Wells Theatre at Sadler's Wells Theatre - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 6th December 2015

Adam Garcia

Adam Garcia - Gala Performance of Matthew Bourne's 'THE CAR MAN' - Arrivals at Sadler's Wells Theatre - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 19th July 2015

Adam Garcia

Adam Garcia and Nathalia Chubin - Gala Celebration in Honour of Kevin Spacey held at the Old Vic Theatre - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 19th April 2015

Adam Garcia and Nathalia Chubin
Adam Garcia and Nathalia Chubin

Adam Garcia and Lauren Cuthbertson - The Olivier Awards held at the Royal Opera House - Winners. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 12th April 2015

Adam Garcia and Lauren Cuthbertson
Adam Garcia, Lauren Cuthbertson and Crystal Pite

Adam Garcia - Celebrities attend photocall for The Diana Award. The ceremony presents awards to inspirational young people, from across the UK. Held at Barclays, Canary Wharf, London at Canary Wharf - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 10th March 2015

Adam Garcia
Adam Garcia
Adam Garcia
David Grant, Paul Forkan, Tessy Ojo, Adam Garcia, Lola Saunders, Ammaar Husein, Lauren Rowles and Anita Dennison
David Grant, Paul Forkan, Tessy Ojo, Adam Garcia, Lola Saunders, Ammaar Husein, Lauren Rowles and Anita
David Grant, Paul Forkan, Tessy Ojo, Adam Garcia, Lola Saunders, Ammaar Husein, Lauren Rowles and Anita Dennison

Nativity 3: Dude Where's My Donkey?! Review


Good

There are so many plot holes in this silly British holiday sequel that the script hardly seems to exist at all. As in the previous two Nativity! movies, the emphasis is on Christmas wackiness, with inane set pieces designed only to keep small children giggling. Writer-director Debbie Isitt clearly isn't interested in connecting these scenes together into something more than vaguely coherent, asking us to just go with it. And if you can do that, you might have some fun with this.

Once again, it's all change at St. Bernadette's School in Coventry. This time there's a new headmistress in the humourless, astonishingly unobservant Mrs Keen (Celia Imrie). She sensibly sacks the dopey teaching assistant Mr Poppy (Marc Wootton) and instead hires "super-teacher" Mr Shepherd (Martin Clunes), who immediately gets rid of Poppy's donkey, the class mascot. In the process though, Shepherd takes a blow to the head and loses his memory, which is a problem because he's due to get married to Sophie (Catherine Tate) in New York. So Shepherd's daughter Lauren (Lauren Hobbs) teams up with Poppy to get the kids into a flashmob competition that culminates with a final round in, of course, Manhattan. The problem is that the competition is being organised by Sophie's preening ex Bradley (Adam Garcia), who wants her back.

Issitt keeps the film moving at such a hyperactive pace that there's barely time to notice that nothing about this story makes any sense. But before we can say, "Wait a minute!" the film has already lurched into a corny slapstick sequence or a big musical number performed with screechy karaoke-style authenticity. Although the songs are packed with clever hooks and repeated so many times that they're impossible to get out of our heads. Oddly, the children are sidelined in this movie, appearing at random for a bit of cacophonous mayhem or another pastiche holiday number. Only Hobbs registers as a character.

Continue reading: Nativity 3: Dude Where's My Donkey?! Review

Nativity 3: Dude Where's My Donkey? Trailer


Mr. Shepherd is the new teacher at St Bernadette's Catholic School in Coventry who is eager to propose to his friend Sophie, to the delight of his young daughter who wants so badly to have a new mother by Christmas. Meanwhile, the school has also gained a new headmistress, Mrs. Keen, who deeply disapproves of the school's favourite teacher - the ever child-like Mr. Poppy - and their pet donkey Archie. The latter pet-peeve is probably for a good reason as soon enough, Mr. Shepherd finds himself deeply concussed after being kicked by Archie, completely forgetting who he is, where he is, where Archie is and, more importantly, that he's soon to be married on Christmas Eve in New York. Mr. Poppy and the class decide to band together to get him to his bride by joining a flash mob, where the top prize is a trip to the Big Apple. Will the class succeed in their latest endeavour and make this Christmas the best yet?

Continue: Nativity 3: Dude Where's My Donkey? Trailer

Bootmen Review


Weak
They're a rough-and-tough gang of incredibly heterosexual Australian steelworkers scraping by in a dying steel town. But all they really want to do is dance. Sadly, Jennifer Beals and her flaming Flashdance welding torch don't make a guest appearance in Bootmen, and that's a shame. Her high kicks and mid-air splits have never seemed more necessary.

Instead, we get Sean (Adam Garcia), the tap-dancing dreamer hoping to get the heck out of Newcastle and make it big in Sydney. He has to work it out with his girlfriend Linda (Sophia Lee) and ignore the insults hurled at him by his Foster's-drinking dad (Richard Carter) and his troublemaking brother Mitchell (Sam Worthington). After getting through all that, he hops on his motorcycle and heads to the big city to make his dreams come true.

Continue reading: Bootmen Review

Coyote Ugly Review


Weak
To understand the horror of Coyote Ugly is to understand how it was made.

It's 1993. Some Hollywood bigshot reads an article in GQ magazine about a nutty bar called the Coyote Ugly in Manhattan. They only have women bartenders, see, and they, like, dance on the bar with fire and stuff! And they don't serve water. If someone orders water they hose down the crowd! Holy mackerel, what a nutty place!

Continue reading: Coyote Ugly Review

The First $20 Million Is Always The Hardest Review


Bad
It's the middle of the dot-com mega boom. Two bright-eyed twenty-somethings drive luxury sports cars down the Silicon Valley freeways, chatting on cell phones about money and meetings. Here's the gag: they're actually in adjacent cars and arrive to work at the same place. Unfortunately, this is some of the stronger and more coherent humor in this lifeless attempt at a big business comedy.

Jon Favreau claims partial responsibility (as co-screenwriter) for this stumbling mess, a film that could've used dark humor and the luxury of retrospect to comment on the freakish habits of our late 1990s Internet culture. (The script, in theory at least, is based on Po Bronson's novel.) Instead, Favreau, screenwriter Gary Tieche (creator of TV's MDs), and director Mick Jackson (L.A. Story) play it as safe, as slow, and as vanilla as possible.

Continue reading: The First $20 Million Is Always The Hardest Review

Confessions Of A Teenage Drama Queen Review


Bad
If you're a fan of Lindsay Lohan (and God knows why you wouldn't be), the burgeoning teenage sex symbol, then drop whatever you're doing and go see Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen. She's in practically every second of the movie wearing an array of flimsy dresses, belly shirts, and tight pants.

However, if you're a fan of Lindsay Lohan, the actress, then stay right where you are. Lohan is a very talented actress, and if you want proof, go rent last year's remake of Freaky Friday, where she matched Jamie Lee Curtis beat for comedy beat. In Confessions, Lohan finally has a starring role. Too bad it's in a movie in desperate need of creativity, compelling conflicts and amusing characters...

Continue reading: Confessions Of A Teenage Drama Queen Review

Riding In Cars With Boys Review


Extraordinary
Chick flicks can be hard to watch. I'll admit it: It was painful to sit through Beaches. Steel Magnolias was a trial. As a man, even as one who prides himself on being fairly sensitive, there's something almost disturbing about watching films that beg for audience waterworks. In short, don't set me up for an emotional episode. If it's going to happen, let it happen; don't lead me down a fiery path to tearjerker destruction.

Riding in Cars with Boys follows the life of Beverly Hasek (Drew Barrymore) as she takes up the difficult role of motherhood at the age of 15, while at the same time, never giving up her dreams. And, while a quintessential chick flick, Riding in Cars chooses to take a higher road -- a genuine road, filled with life lessons so real you can feel them burning their way down your throat and tugging at that little place inside you that says, "Hey, this could have been me!"

Continue reading: Riding In Cars With Boys Review

Riding In Cars With Boys Review


OK

When a movie says it's "based on" a true story, all too often it means that after the script doctors get through with it, what's left is too predictable and packed with clichés to bear any resemblance to the randomness of real life. Such is the case with "Riding In Cars With Boys."

But it just so happens that clichés and predictability are director Penny Marshall specialty. Idle since "A League of Their Own" -- which was totally trite yet thoroughly enjoyable -- Marshall applies her syrupy, low-cal sentimentality to this adapted autobiography of writer Beverly Donofrio, whose youthful ambition was derailed in 1965, by getting knocked up at age 15.

A maudlin but self-deprecating, bittersweet comedy-drama in which major crises are solved with little more than hugs, Beverly's journey through motherhood would be the stuff of a Lifetime Channel movie-of-the-week if not for its gusty sense of humor and a phenomenal performance of extraordinary depth and range by the previously beguiling but frivolous Drew Barrymore.

Continue reading: Riding In Cars With Boys Review

Coyote Ugly Review


Weak

The latest paint-by-numbers cinematic mind-number from uber-slick schlock producer Jerry Bruckheimer ("Gone in 60 Seconds," "Armageddon," "Con Air," etc.), "Coyote Ugly" is can be summed up in three words: "Flashdance" meets "Cocktail."

Piper Perabo ("The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle") -- a wide-eyed, bee-stung beauty from central casting -- is the movie's generic ingenue, a girl named Violet from small town New Jersey who moves to New York to pursue her dreams of being a songwriter for "Whitney, Mariah, whoever..." Of course, even though she grew up just down the turnpike from Manhattan, she's as naive as a farmer's daughter and learns the hard way that peddling your demo tape to snide receptionists at record label offices isn't going to get you anywhere in the Big City.

So instead of becoming an instant music biz success, Violet finds herself working at the meat packing district's wildest road house, Coyote Ugly.

Continue reading: Coyote Ugly Review

Bootmen Review


Weak

Take away the stagey but sensational, industrial-hip tap dance numbers, and all that's left of "Bootmen" is cheap, embarrassingly unoriginal, melodramatic-romantic swill.

An Aussie import about Newcastle steel workers who wish they were Broadway hoofers, the movie is nothing but one-dimensional stock characters trudging through a trite retread plot, waiting for the soundtrack to kick in so they can get jiggy.

Boy-band cute Adam Garcia ("Coyote Ugly") is the mildly rebellious son of long-dead mom and an unsupportive, hard-drinking pop (Richard Carter) who thinks his son should give up his aspirations and resign himself to a blue collar life. "You've never even seen me tap!" Garcia whines.

Continue reading: Bootmen Review

Adam Garcia

Adam Garcia Quick Links

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Adam Garcia

Date of birth

1st June, 1973

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.80




Adam Garcia Movies

Nativity 3: Dude Where's My Donkey?! Movie Review

Nativity 3: Dude Where's My Donkey?! Movie Review

There are so many plot holes in this silly British holiday sequel that the script...

Nativity 3: Dude Where's My Donkey? Trailer

Nativity 3: Dude Where's My Donkey? Trailer

Mr. Shepherd is the new teacher at St Bernadette's Catholic School in Coventry who is...

Bootmen Movie Review

Bootmen Movie Review

They're a rough-and-tough gang of incredibly heterosexual Australian steelworkers scraping by in a dying steel...

Coyote Ugly Movie Review

Coyote Ugly Movie Review

To understand the horror of Coyote Ugly is to understand how it was made.It's 1993....

The First $20 Million Is Always the Hardest Movie Review

The First $20 Million Is Always the Hardest Movie Review

It's the middle of the dot-com mega boom. Two bright-eyed twenty-somethings drive luxury sports...

Confessions Of A Teenage Drama Queen Movie Review

Confessions Of A Teenage Drama Queen Movie Review

If you're a fan of Lindsay Lohan (and God knows why you wouldn't be), the...

Riding in Cars with Boys Movie Review

Riding in Cars with Boys Movie Review

Chick flicks can be hard to watch. I'll admit it: It was painful to...

Riding In Cars With Boys Movie Review

Riding In Cars With Boys Movie Review

When a movie says it's "based on" a true story, all too often it means...

Coyote Ugly Movie Review

Coyote Ugly Movie Review

The latest paint-by-numbers cinematic mind-number from uber-slick schlock producer Jerry Bruckheimer ("Gone in 60 Seconds,"...

Bootmen Movie Review

Bootmen Movie Review

Take away the stagey but sensational, industrial-hip tap dance numbers, and all that's left of...

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