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USO of NYC and Hard Rock Cafe host the official Fleet Week Kick Off Party

Adam Baldwin - USO of NYC and Hard Rock Cafe host the official Fleet Week Kick Off Party - New York, United States - Wednesday 20th May 2015

Jedediah Bila and Adam Baldwin
Jocko Sims and Adam Baldwin

TNT 25th Anniversary Party

Adam Baldwin - TNT's 25th Anniversary Party held at the Aqua Star Pool at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Wednesday 24th July 2013

Adam Baldwin
Adam Baldwin
Adam Baldwin
Adam Baldwin
Adam Baldwin

Comic-Con 2011 Day 4 - Entertainment Weekly Party - Arrivals

Adam Baldwin Sunday 24th July 2011 Comic-Con 2011 Day 4 - Entertainment Weekly Party - Arrivals San Diego, California

Adam Baldwin

Firefly: The Complete Series Review


Excellent
Firefly was an unexpectedly shortened series created by writer/director Joss Whedon (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel) that aired in the fall of 2002. The grassroots popularity of its limited run was able to spawn a highly enjoyable feature film shortly thereafter, Serenity. Though it all ended abruptly, there is much in the finished episodes to appreciate, and the complete series on DVD includes three excellent episodes that never aired.

The name of the series comes from the model of spaceship our protagonists travel in. It's an out-dated clunker full of problems but it's a comfortable mobile home that engineer Kaylee (Jewel Staite) affectionately maintains for a variety of passengers who fall in the enormous gap between government (a.k.a. Alliance) official and beggar on the fringe. Captained by Malcolm Reynolds (Nathan Fillion, Waitress), the crew flies from one smuggling or delivery job to the next, be they legal or not under Alliance rules, to maintain their independence. Their main objective is to keep food on the table, fuel in the tank, and to stay away from Reavers, hideous beings whose hunger for anything living is never satisfied. By staying on a planet too long they would end up on the Alliance's radar, or end up slaves to a system they don't wish to support, so purposeful vagabonds they are when we join them.

Continue reading: Firefly: The Complete Series Review

The Right Temptation Review


Grim
Wow, when did Rebecca De Mornay get old? The Right Temptation is hardly a fitting title for so untempting a movie, a ridiculously unbelievable thriller that puts De Mornay in the middle of a scam dreamed up by Dana Delany's troublesome wife to Kiefer Sutherland. From the moment requests "a woman" be put on her P.I. case, you know something's fishy.... The trouble is, the fish is rotten. Kudos to De Mornay's pet pig, though.

Predator 2 Review


Weak
Every good monster movie deserves a sequel, and with few exceptions they get a crappy one. Predator 2 is right in line with that legacy, a lackluster (and Schwarzenegger-free) action flick that steals every page it can from the Aliens playbook.

Since Predator took place in the jungle, Hollywood's sense of irony dictates that the sequel should take place in the city: In this case, Los Angeles, where a bloody gang war is underway. But the cops (notably renegade do-gooder Danny Glover) can't quite reconcile the body count, and it isn't long until they start to realize that another force is at work, which might explain the metallic bits that no one can identify and the corpses missing all their vital organs.

Continue reading: Predator 2 Review

Double Bang Review


Weak
It's double the Baldwins and Double the Bang in this insanely great direct-to-video flick!

Er, well, would you believe it's not that bad? Now that your expectations are appropriately middling, you might be able to appreciate Double Bang, a reasonably entertaining cop drama about an NYPD officer (William Baldwin) who gets all upset when he crooked partner (Adam Baldwin) ends up dead. Billy heads out on a vigilante mission, interrogating the usual suspects and dishing out his own brand of justice by turning the bad guys against their own.

Continue reading: Double Bang Review

Full Metal Jacket Review


Extraordinary
The best movie ever made about the American experience in Vietnam happens to have been filmed by an American expatriate living in Britain. Stanley Kubrick's war masterpiece is split into two parts, and it's the first that is laser-engraved into the psyche of any film fan. R. Lee Ermey has never (and will never) be able to shake the role of the uber-demanding sergeant, and Matthew Modine and Vincent D'Onofrio turn in career-making performances as well. Written tautly to the point where it's impossible to look away, this harrowing look at the war -- and what the experience was like for the troops before they ever set foot on foreign soil -- is unmatched in the genre.

The Right Temptation Review


Grim
Wow, when did Rebecca De Mornay get old? The Right Temptation is hardly a fitting title for so untempting a movie, a ridiculously unbelievable thriller that puts De Mornay in the middle of a scam dreamed up by Dana Delany's troublesome wife to Kiefer Sutherland. From the moment requests "a woman" be put on her P.I. case, you know something's fishy.... The trouble is, the fish is rotten. Kudos to De Mornay's pet pig, though.

Serenity Review


OK
Somehow, in the wake of Lucas' CGI evisceration of his own work and overblown space operas like The Chronicles of Riddick, somebody still knows how to put together an outer-space romp that trades just as heavily on quips and character as it does on conflict and explosions. All the better, there's barely a movie star in sight. The film in question is Serenity, the by-product of Buffy the Vampire Slayer Joss Whedon's sci-fi series Firefly. Somehow, Whedon convinced Universal to pony up about $45 million to make and show Serenity to multiplex audiences, 95 percent of whom will have never seen the original series, which lasted on Fox for only 11 episodes back in 2002.

It's no matter, though, as Whedon gets the uninitiated up to speed quick: 500 years in the future, most of the human-colonized galaxy is controlled by the autocratic Alliance, who won a war some time ago against the rebel Independents, now roaming the fringes of explored space. This is where we find the rattletrap freighter Serenity, crewed by a loveable gaggle of rogues who want to be free to wander at will and maybe pull off the occasional crime. The unusually personable crew is led by Malcolm "Mal" Reynolds (Nathan Fillion), a sarcastic loner with a not-so-secret heart of idealism. A shambling kind of hero, he's about the best thing to hit movie screens since Harrison Ford lost his sense of humor. Since every good hero needs sidekicks, Mal's backed up by badass Zoe (Gina Torres), her geeky husband Wash (Alan Tudyk), weapons-crazed lunkhead Jayne (Adam Baldwin), and wide-eyed girl mechanic Kaylee (Jewel State). There's also some new crewmates: a doctor, Simon (Sean Maher), who we've seen busting his teenaged sister River (Summer Glau) out of an Alliance research facility where she'd been being turned into a psychotic killing machine. Now River just mopes around the ship, occasionally having psychic flashes, while Simon ignores advances from lovestruck Kaylee.

Continue reading: Serenity Review

Jackpot Review


Good
This cute and harmless road movie wants to come across as edgy and Pulp Fictiony, but sideburns alone do not a tough guy make. Jon Gries (Lazlo from Real Genius) makes a rare starring appearance as a karaoke singer convinced he'll make it in the real world of music, to the point where he has abandoned his family to go on a Midwestern tour of karaoke bars in search of stardom. Plenty of amusing moments and fun to watch, but not exactly groundbreaking. And is Anthony Edwards in every movie set in the desert now?

Jackpot Review


Weak

Sunny Holiday is a karaoke singer with delusions of grandeur. It's not that he's a bad singer or lacks stage presence -- heck, cue up a catchy country tune in a roadside bar and Sunny can get folks to dancing with his sad-sack twangy stylings.

But Sunny (Jon Gries) keeps telling himself it's only a matter of time before he's "discovered" in one of these dives and swept into a showbiz fantasy world. It's to that end that Sunny -- an unemployed absentee father who sleeps in a 20-year-old pink Chrysler and drives all over the Southwest seeking karaoke contents -- has hired a manager.

Lester (Garrett Morris) sleeps in the car too. He's followed Sunny to 43 cities, offering fatigued, musty words of encouragement in dingy men's rooms and insisting that his only client is building a fan base on this "tour." Meanwhile, they're paying for gas with jars of pennies, and Sunny's only contact with his wife and baby daughter are the quick-pick lotto tickets he sends home once a week, likening them to child support.

Continue reading: Jackpot Review

The Patriot Review


Weak

For a relentlessly unoriginal, pandering and predictable, two-and-a-half hour Revolutionary War epic that white-washes slavery, chooses exaggerated slow-motion action over any interest in historical accuracy and is helmed by a director who has demonstrated little talent for anything but overblown textbook filmmaking, "The Patriot" isn't a bad movie.

It's a mimeographed knock-off of "Braveheart" in buckskin vests and powdered wigs, but that doesn't seem to bother Mel Gibson, who won an Oscar for directing that film and stars in this one as another tread-upon colonial who takes up arms against England for his nation's freedom.

A hero of the French and Indian War who has since pledged to raise his children as a pacifist plantation farmer in South Carolina, Benjamin Martin (Gibson) is an amalgam of real revolutionary war figures, fantasized by screenwriter Robert Rodat ("Saving Private Ryan") as a politically correct hero who is a wonderful widower father, who communes with the natives (he's versed in the deadly use of a Tomahawk hatchet), who employs his plantation workers instead of enslaving them, and who takes up arms again only after a stuffy, sadistic redcoat Colonel named Tavington (Jason Issacs) kills one of his sons in cold blood when he finds Martin's home filled with rebel soldiers receiving first aid after a battle.

Continue reading: The Patriot Review

Adam Baldwin

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