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World premiere of Disney's 'Million Dollar Arm' - Arrivals

Guest and Adam Arkin - World premiere of Disney's 'Million Dollar Arm' held at El Capitain Theatre - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 6th May 2014

Jerry O'Connell grabs a Bite

Jerry O’Connell and Adam Arkin - Jerry O'Connell grabs a Bite from a hidden sandwich he kept in the back seat of his TV Show Vehicle. O'connell was filming his new show WE Are Men in Hollywood - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Tuesday 13th August 2013

Jerry O’Connell and Adam Arkin

The Sessions Review


Excellent

By taking a sensitive, honest approach to this true story, breakthrough filmmaker Lewin both avoids sentimentality and keeps the focus on the inner lives of the central characters. He also somehow manages to make a movie about a sexual surrogate strongly involving: we are never even remotely tempted to giggle.

This is the story of Mark O'Brien (Hawkes), a journalist from Berkeley, California, who lives in an iron lung that he can only leave for a few hours a week. Paralysed from the neck down by polio as a young boy, Mark decides at age 38 that he wants to lose his virginity. Consumed by Catholic guilt about this desire, he consults his local priest (Macy), who says he deserves a pass on this one. So his no-nonsense assistant Vera (Bloodgood) finds him a surrogate in Cheryl (Hunt), who starts eight sessions that are designed to lead to sex. And as she gets to know Mark, Cheryl begins to let her guard down.

Lewin refuses to shy away from any aspect of this story, confronting everything in honest, sometimes uncomfortable ways that are never remotely sentimentalised. It would be easy to drift into syruppy schmaltz with this kind of material, but the script maintains a bracingly sharp wit, and the actors cleverly underplay every scene. This adds to the realism and helps us understand all of the people on-screen. Hawkes and Hunt are both transparent and revelatory, each in a difficult role that could have been much showier, but is stronger due to their restraint. Macy and Bloodgood are terrific as the sardonic supporting characters. And Marks (as another assistant) and Arkin (as Cheryl's understanding husband) add terrific layers to their much smaller roles.

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Picture - Adam Arkin Los Angeles, California, Thursday 25th February 2010

Adam Arkin Thursday 25th February 2010 Premiere Screening of Discovery Channel’s 'LIFE' at the Getty Center - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Adam Arkin

A Serious Man Review


Essential
The Coen brothers take another sharp turn, catching us off-guard with this offbeat suburban drama that's not only a witty window into America's Jewish subculture, but also a potent exploration of the pressures of modern life.

In 1967 Minnesota, physics professor Larry Gopnik (Stuhlbarg) is struggling as squeezes in on him. His loser uncle (Kind) has taken up residence on the sofa, his wife (Lennick) has decided to run off with a local widower (Melamed), and his teen kids (Wolff and McManus) are constantly pestering him about trivialities. Meanwhile, he's waiting to hear if he'll be given tenure at work and facing some medical tests. To make sense of it all, he consults his lawyer (Arkin) and a series of rabbis (Helberg, Wyner and Mandell).

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A Serious Man Trailer


The Coen Brothers need little introduction, their career up to this point speaks for its self, they've directed some of the the 90's and 00'most memorable movies, including Fargo, The Big Lebowski and their most recent hit Burn After Reading. The duo now bring us A Serious Man, Larry Nidus is a good and loving man, a university professor with a wife and children. When his wife approaches Larry asking for a divorce without giving him a valid reason, it begins a downward spiral in his life. Larry learns his wife has a new partner and that he's also facing disciplinary proceedings at work following a series of anonymous letters accusing the professor of various treacheries Larry's life has seen better times. Not everyone's life has a silver lining, sometimes it really just is that bad.

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Marley & Me Review


Terrible
Animal films are critical landmines. Step wrong, opinion-wise, and readers will accuse you of being everything from heartless and insensitive to PETA's public enemy number one. Clearly, Old Yeller and other four-footed tearjerkers have made canines the noblest of our beloved domesticated friends. After topping the bestseller's list with his autobiographical memoir Marley and Me, journalist John Grogan is seeing his tale of the world's worst pooch finally make it to the big screen -- and it's time to get out the tar and feathers. Instead of being uplifting and heartwarming, this excruciating effort is 90 minutes of mediocrity followed by 10 minutes of the most manipulative, mean-spirited pap ever put into a movie made for families.

When they get married, reporters John Grogan (Owen Wilson) and his new bride Jenny (Jennifer Aniston) picture themselves setting the Fourth Estate on fire. Eventually, they end up in South Florida where she handles hot button political and social stories. He, on the other hand, is relegated to writing about building fires and lame local oddities. When his sourpuss editor (Alan Arkin) offers him a column, John is unsure what to do. Taking inspiration from the new dog named Marley he just adopted, our scribe is soon scribbling stories about how this cute-as-a-button Labrador retriever is evil incarnate. Labeled "the world's worst dog," Marley lives up to the title. Even as the Grogans grow older and raise a family, they still don't know what to do with their destructive hound from Hell.

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Picture - Adam Arkin Westwood, California, Monday 16th June 2008

Adam Arkin Monday 16th June 2008 Premiere of 'Get Smart' at Mann's Village Theater - Arrivals Westwood, California

Adam Arkin
Adam Arkin

Graduation Review


Unbearable
It's never a good sign when a movie is released on DVD just weeks after its limited theatrical release. Still, you'll wonder how Graduation avoided going straight to DVD in the first place.

The premise of Graduation is stupid enough: Carl (Chris Marquette) needs $100,000 to pay for the medical treatment of his dying mother, so his posse concludes the only way to obtain this sum is to rob a bank. Gee, I wonder how else they can come up with 100 grand? The main character Polly's father (Adam Arkin) happens to be a bank owner. Perhaps he has 100 grand in his own savings, or at least a portion of it, that he can loan to Carl? Or how about a citywide fundraiser? No, even for Polly (Shannon Lucio), the high school's valedictorian, robbing her father's bank is the only logical step.

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Dropping Out Review


Essential
Emile (Kent Osborne) is a pretty humble guy. He just wants one simple thing out of his life: for it to be just as picture-perfect as the TV. The opiate of the masses known as television is Emile's drug of choice as he wanders through the world of the nicotine-stained San Fernando Valley. Everything is, as in the television, just fine and dandy until one day a squirrel lands on Emile's cable, disconnecting it. So, confronted with an absolute dearth of television reception, Emile decides to slit his wrists.

From there on in, we enter into one of the funniest and most meaningful dark comedies since Happiness. You see; Emile's suicide attempt is interrupted by a call from the manager of a hotel, at which Emile begins to work the night shift. One night, after the local supermarket is out of chicken potpies, Emile announces to Henry (David Koechner), his co-worker, that he wants to commit suicide. He also requests that Henry will send the tape to Emile's ex-girlfriend and clean up after the act.

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A Slight Case Of Murder (1999) Review


Excellent
TNT continues to prove itself as a powerhouse of made-for-TV filmmaking. This modern noir, with Macy as a put-upon film critic who accidentally kills one of his girlfriends and tries to cover it up, is relentlessly entertaining. I could do without the commercials every eight minutes, though. William H. Macy co-wrote the script.

Marilyn Hotchkiss Ballroom Dancing & Charm School Review


Weak
So here's the scoop: In 1990, a novice director named Randall Miller made a 30-minute short film called Marilyn Hotchkiss' Ballroom Dancing and Charm School, about the titular academy for young children who learn to dance and be polite, etc. An amazing 15 years later, after paying his dues on films like Houseguest and H-E Double Hockey Sticks and TV shows like Popular, he figured he'd take that short, add an hour to it (which takes place 40 years later), and mix it up into a film called Marilyn Hotchkiss Ballroom Dancing & Charm School. (You see, he lost an apostrophe and an "and" but gained an ampersand.)

That's some dedication to your story, but it turns out that neither the original Hotchkiss nor the updated one merit that much consideration. The short is your expected coming-of-age tale: A kid named Steve hates girls, but over time (and thanks to Hotchkiss) he comes to love them, particularly a gal named Lisa.

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Hanging Up Review


Weak
There's just something really screwy about a family like the Ephrons.

A pair of sisters (Nora and Delia) collectively control the purse strings of many a woman and hold they keys to the heart of the modern romantic through two movies: Sleepless in Seattle and You've Got Mail. Nora Ephron (along with Meg Ryan), redefined delis and male-female interaction with 1989's When Harry Met Sally.... Both are the daughters of a screenwriting duo, children of The Industry, and have become higher-level powerbrokers than their parents ever were with a string of well publicized hits and soon forgotten misses that formed a winning streak that lasted up until now.

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Dropping Out Review


Essential
Emile (Kent Osborne) is a pretty humble guy. He just wants one simple thing out of his life: for it to be just as picture-perfect as the TV. The opiate of the masses known as television is Emile's drug of choice as he wanders through the world of the nicotine-stained San Fernando Valley. Everything is, as in the television, just fine and dandy until one day a squirrel lands on Emile's cable, disconnecting it. So, confronted with an absolute dearth of television reception, Emile decides to slit his wrists.

From there on in, we enter into one of the funniest and most meaningful dark comedies since Happiness. You see; Emile's suicide attempt is interrupted by a call from the manager of a hotel, at which Emile begins to work the night shift. One night, after the local supermarket is out of chicken potpies, Emile announces to Henry (David Koechner), his co-worker, that he wants to commit suicide. He also requests that Henry will send the tape to Emile's ex-girlfriend and clean up after the act.

Continue reading: Dropping Out Review

Adam Arkin

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